POETICDEV

50 %
50 %
Information about POETICDEV
Education

Published on February 23, 2014

Author: bookerhs

Source: authorstream.com

Allusion: A reference to something or someone often literary. For instance, if you were trying to instill confidence in a friend and said, “Use the force,” that would be an allusion to Stars Wars. The verb form of allusion is to allude. : Allusion: A reference to something or someone often literary. For instance, if you were trying to instill confidence in a friend and said, “Use the force,” that would be an allusion to Stars Wars. The verb form of allusion is to allude. Assonance The repetition of vowel sounds as in “Days wane away.” : Assonance The repetition of vowel sounds as in “Days wane away.” Blank verse: Unrhymed lines of poetry usually in iambic pentameter. Plenty of modern poetry is written in blank verse. : Blank verse: Unrhymed lines of poetry usually in iambic pentameter. Plenty of modern poetry is written in blank verse. Couplets: A pair of rhyming lines in a poem often set off from the rest of the poem. Shakespeare’s sonnets all end in couplets. : Couplets: A pair of rhyming lines in a poem often set off from the rest of the poem. Shakespeare’s sonnets all end in couplets. Elegy: A poem mourning the dead. : Elegy: A poem mourning the dead. End rhyme: Rhyming words that are at the ends of their respective lines—what we typically think of as normal rhyme. : End rhyme: Rhyming words that are at the ends of their respective lines—what we typically think of as normal rhyme. Epic: A long poem narrating the adventures of a heroic figure—for example, Homer’s The Odyssey. : Epic: A long poem narrating the adventures of a heroic figure—for example, Homer’s The Odyssey . Figurative Language (a.k.a figures of speech): Figurative Language (a.k.a figures of speech) The intentional departure from the normal usage of words Writers use figures of speech to help readers visualize what is happening in their stories and/or poems. Figures of speech include metaphors, similes, and personification. IMAGERY: IMAGERY The “word pictures” that writers create to help evoke an emotional response. Writers use sensory details , or descriptions that appeal to one or more of the five senses: sight, hearing, touch, taste, and smell. Metaphor : Metaphor Comparing two unlike things saying that one thing literally is something else Her positive attitude was a refreshing rain which rejuvenated everyone in her presence. She lifted her concrete hands as she wearily finished the task. Onomatopoeia: Onomatopoeia The use of words whose sounds imitate their meaning Drip, gurgle, bang, buzz, honk Snap, crackle, pop, thud, sizzle Simile: A comparison that uses “like” or “as” For example, “I’m as hungry as a wolf,” or “My love is like a rose.” : Simile: A comparison that uses “like” or “as” For example, “I’m as hungry as a wolf,” or “My love is like a rose.” Symbolism: The use of one things to represent another. For example, a dove is a symbol of peace. : Symbolism: The use of one things to represent another. For example, a dove is a symbol of peace. Tone: The author’s attitude toward his or her subject. For example, a tone could be pessimistic, optimistic, or angry. : Tone: The author’s attitude toward his or her subject. For example, a tone could be pessimistic, optimistic, or angry. Quatrain: A four-line stanza. : Quatrain: A four-line stanza. Sonnet: A fourteen-line poem written iambic pentameter. Different kinds of sonnets have different rhyme schemes. : Sonnet: A fourteen-line poem written iambic pentameter. Different kinds of sonnets have different rhyme schemes. Stanza: A section of poetry separated from the sections before and after it; a verse “paragraph.” : Stanza: A section of poetry separated from the sections before and after it; a verse “paragraph.” Meter: The pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables in the lines of a poem. : Meter: The pattern of stressed and unstressed syllables in the lines of a poem. Imagery: Imagery Patterns in a literary work that create an image (or images) in a reader’s mind; (2) Language that appeals to the five senses Example:: Example: Andrew Marvell’s “To His Coy Mistress” But at my back I always hear   Time's wingèd chariot hurrying near;   And yonder all before us lie   Deserts of vast eternity.   Thy beauty shall no more be found,    Nor, in thy marble vault, shall sound   My echoing song: then worms shall try   That long preserved virginity,   And your quaint honor turn to dust,   And into ashes all my lust:    The grave's a fine and private place,   But none, I think, do there embrace.   Time's     Deserts eternity.     marble vault   worms   preserved   dust  ashes    grave’s   Iambic pentameter: Ten-syllable lines in which every other syllable is stressed. For example: “With eyes like stars upon the brave night air.” : Iambic pentameter: Ten-syllable lines in which every other syllable is stressed. For example: “With eyes like stars upon the brave night air.” Quatrain: A four-line stanza. : Quatrain: A four-line stanza. Stanza: A section of poetry separated from the sections before and after it; a verse “paragraph.” : Stanza: A section of poetry separated from the sections before and after it; a verse “paragraph.” Free Verse: Poetry with no set meter (rhythm) or rhyme scheme. : Free Verse: Poetry with no set meter (rhythm) or rhyme scheme. End rhyme: Rhyming words that are at the ends of their respective lines—what we typically think of as normal rhyme. : End rhyme: Rhyming words that are at the ends of their respective lines—what we typically think of as normal rhyme. Lyric: A type of poetry that expresses the poet’s emotions. It often tells some sort of brief story, engaging the reading in the experience. : Lyric: A type of poetry that expresses the poet’s emotions. It often tells some sort of brief story, engaging the reading in the experience. Iambic pentameter: Ten-syllable lines in which every other syllable is stressed. For example: “With eyes like stars upon the brave night air.” : Iambic pentameter: Ten-syllable lines in which every other syllable is stressed. For example: “With eyes like stars upon the brave night air.” Internal rhyme: A rhyme that occurs within one line such as “He’s King of the Swing.” : Internal rhyme: A rhyme that occurs within one line such as “He’s King of the Swing.” Sonnet: A fourteen-line poem written iambic pentameter. Different kinds of sonnets have different rhyme schemes. : Sonnet: A fourteen-line poem written iambic pentameter. Different kinds of sonnets have different rhyme schemes. Blank verse: Unrhymed lines of poetry usually in iambic pentameter. Plenty of modern poetry is written in blank verse. : Blank verse: Unrhymed lines of poetry usually in iambic pentameter. Plenty of modern poetry is written in blank verse. Epic: A long poem narrating the adventures of a heroic figure—for example, Homer’s The Odyssey. : Epic: A long poem narrating the adventures of a heroic figure—for example, Homer’s The Odyssey .

Add a comment

Related presentations

Related pages

Fifth Grade Teachers - poeticdev.pdf - History

Wikispaces Classroom is now free, social, and easier than ever. Try it today.
Read more

Fifth Grade Teachers - poeticdev.pdf - Links

Backlinks. The following pages contain links back to this file. Page Date Edited; 1 of 1 : Language: Jun 27, 2012: Help · About · Blog · Pricing ...
Read more

Name Poetic Devices - English Worksheets Land

Name Poetic Devices ... http://www.englishworksheetsland.com/poeticdev.html Subject: Poetic Devices Worksheets Created Date: 12/29/2015 10:11:57 AM ...
Read more

Frost Middle School

poeticdev 7 months ago by Rodney Pauley 15. figurative-language-lesson and quiz 7 months ago by Rodney Pauley 14. Identifying Character Traits ...
Read more

kmott - Personification

Personification Example Sentences ... http://home.att.net/~TEACHING/langarts/poeticdev.pdf 5. Personification Lesson Plan
Read more

Poetic Devices Worksheets - English Worksheets Land

Acquainted with the Night – On the lines, give an example of each of the following poetic devices in the poem above.
Read more

Metaphor Alliteration - schochsite.pbworks.com

Rhyme Words that have the same ending sounds “The tiny bird in the tree Was singing songs just for me.” Simile A figure of speech in which
Read more

Newsletters - Mrs. Crawford's Class

Newsletters CCGPS 5th Grade Reading Standards Useful Links homereadlog.pdf: File Size: 82 kb: File Type: ... poeticdev.pdf: File Size: 117 kb: File Type: pdf:
Read more

Poetic Devices - Book Units Teacher

Poetic Devices. Figurative language is used when a writer describes something using comparisons that go beyond literal meaning. The words mean more than ...
Read more