palouse

50 %
50 %
Information about palouse
Entertainment

Published on September 27, 2007

Author: Olivia

Source: authorstream.com

Hydrologic Conditions in the Palouse Aquifer:  Hydrologic Conditions in the Palouse Aquifer Dale R. Ralston Professor Emeritus of Hydrogeology University of Idaho Outline of talk:  Outline of talk Introduction Ground water management concepts Description of the Palouse aquifer Well development and water level decline Research and management activities Water management questions Ground Water Management Concepts:  Ground Water Management Concepts Long-Term Equilibrium - Recharge Equals Discharge:  Long-Term Equilibrium - Recharge Equals Discharge Ground Water Management Concepts Water levels are stable prior to development or when pumping amount is small:  Water levels are stable prior to development or when pumping amount is small Time (years) Water Level Ground Water Management Concepts Addition of Pumping Can Result in a New Equilibrium:  Addition of Pumping Can Result in a New Equilibrium STORAGE INFLOW OUTFLOW Water levels decline until inflow = outflow + withdrawal Withdrawal Ground Water Management Concepts Development of well(s) with a constant pumping rate can result in water-level decline leading to a new equilibrium:  Development of well(s) with a constant pumping rate can result in water-level decline leading to a new equilibrium Time Aquifer water level Constant pumping rate Ground Water Management Concepts Development of wells with a increasing combined pumping rate will result in continual water-level decline:  Development of wells with a increasing combined pumping rate will result in continual water-level decline Time Aquifer water level Increasing pumping rate Ground Water Management Concepts General Geologic Setting:  General Geologic Setting Subsurface geology of the Palouse basin is dominated by basalt with layers of sediment, mostly along the east margin Basalt and sediment overlie older rocks that make up Moscow Mountain and Paradise Ridge Slide10:  Outline of the Columbia River Basalt Group Wanapum Formation: Priest Rapids Member :  Wanapum Formation: Priest Rapids Member Wanapum Formation is the uppermost basalt unit in the Palouse basin Priest Rapids member is present in most areas with the Rosa member present west of Pullman This formation hosts the upper aquifer in the Palouse basin Grande Ronde Formation:  Grande Ronde Formation Grande Ronde basalt makes up the majority of the subsurface section in the Palouse basin and other locations in Eastern Washington and Northern Idaho Formation is divided into four units based on paleo-magnetism This formation hosts the lower aquifer in the Palouse basin and is the major water producer in Lewiston and in the Grangeville area Slide13:  M P Pa Smoot Hill Kamiak Butte Ringo Butte Tomer Butte Bald Butte 500 1000 2000 1500 1500 WGS84 117º W 46.9º N 117.2º W C Moscow Mountain Pre-Basalt Topography Slide14:  Smoot Hill Kamiak Butte Ringo Butte Tomer Butte Bald Butte WGS84 117º W 46.9º N 117.2º W ? ? Emplacement from SW Primary dip Extent of R1 flows Sedimentation P M Pa C Moscow Mountain Geology After First Sequence of Grande Ronde Basalt Slide15:  Geology After Second Sequence of Grande Ronde Basalt Smoot Hill Kamiak Butte Ringo Butte Tomer Butte Bald Butte WGS84 117º W 46.9º N 117.2º W ? ? Emplacement from SW Primary dip Extent of N1 flows Sedimentation P M Pa C Moscow Mountain Slide16:  Smoot Hill Kamiak Butte Ringo Butte Tomer Butte Bald Butte P Pa WGS84 117º W 46.9º N 117.2º W C Moscow Mountain SNAKE RIVER Basalt Flow Direction M Geology After Third Sequence of Grande Ronde Basalt Slide17:  Smoot Hill Kamiak Butte Ringo Butte Tomer Butte Bald Butte P Pa WGS84 117º W 46.9º N 117.2º W C Moscow Mountain SNAKE RIVER Basalt Flow Direction Flow Direction ? M Geology After Fourth Sequence of Grande Ronde Basalt Area Hydrogeology - 1:  Area Hydrogeology - 1 Upper aquifer occurs in the Wanapum Formation Lower aquifer occurs in the Grande Ronde Formation Depth to water in upper aquifer is about 60 feet while the depth to water in the lower aquifer is about 300 feet Area Hydrogeology - 2:  Area Hydrogeology - 2 Recharge to upper aquifer occurs from infiltration of precipitation and stream loss Recharge to lower aquifer occurs primarily as downward leakage from upper aquifer Recharge to the upper aquifer is greater than to the lower aquifer although present estimates of recharge rates have large error band Well Development and Water-Level Decline:  Well Development and Water-Level Decline Well development -- 1:  Well development -- 1 In Moscow, the upper aquifer water levels declined until 1960’s when deep wells were drilled and withdrawal was shifted to lower aquifer – water levels now have recovered to 1940’s levels City of Moscow now withdraws about 30 percent from the upper aquifer Well Development -- 2:  Well Development -- 2 Water level decline has been experienced in the lower aquifer in Moscow, Pullman and Palouse There is considerable evidence that these three cities obtain water from the same aquifer system Water Levels from Grande Ronde wells in Moscow and Pullman:  Water Levels from Grande Ronde wells in Moscow and Pullman Moscow Wells Pullman Wells M-6 M-8 M-9 UI-3 WSU test P-4 P-3 Research and Water Management Activities:  Research and Water Management Activities Ground water model (1990) PBAC (Palouse Basin Aquifer Committee) formed and developed plan Pumping from the Grande Ronde aquifer has been stabilized Additional research on geology, water ages and water level patterns Ground Water Model (1990):  Ground Water Model (1990) Cooperative effort of USGS and UI Represent upper and lower aquifers Primary results Ground water levels will continue to decline if pumping amounts continue to increase Ground water levels will stop declining (within 10 to 15 years) if pumping is stabilized Palouse Basin Aquifer Committee (PBAC) -- 1:  Palouse Basin Aquifer Committee (PBAC) -- 1 Includes cities, Universities and counties from both states General goal is to ensure a long-term water supply for the basin The goal of stabilizing pumping from the lower aquifer was accomplished in the 1990’s In 1999, PBAC’s revised goal was to stabilize ground water levels in lower aquifer by 2020 by conservation and possible recharge enhancement PBAC has supported and encouraged water conservation and aquifer research Slide30:  Decline rate of about 1.4 ft/yr Palouse Basin Aquifer Committee (PBAC) -- 2:  Palouse Basin Aquifer Committee (PBAC) -- 2 Ongoing research projects at both UI and WSU (geology, water levels, age dating of water) are leading to an improved understanding of the aquifer. Plans are underway to construct several test wells in areas where geologic and hydrologic data are limited. $100,000 federal appropriation, in process, will allow additional research. Water Management Questions -- 1:  Water Management Questions -- 1 Is the deep aquifer in the Moscow area part of a larger aquifer system that includes Pullman and Palouse and possibly Colfax and Garfield? Yes – the areas are hydraulically connected. Does this aquifer receive recharge? Yes – although we do not know if the recharge rate is greater than or less than the combined pumping rate of the four entities. Water Management Questions – 2:  Water Management Questions – 2 Are we facing the loss of our water supply source in the near future? No – the quantity of water still in storage in the aquifer is large. However, we need to continue to take action to insure that we have a sufficient water supply into the future. Water Management Questions -- 3:  Water Management Questions -- 3 Is water conservation a long-term solution for the aquifer problem? Water conservation is important but may or may not be enough to insure that the area has a stable water source for decades into the future. Water Management Questions -- 4:  Water Management Questions -- 4 What can we do if stabilizing pumping does not stabilize water levels? PBAC is now investigating recharge enhancement alternatives and encouraging entities to turn to alternative sources of water. Water Management Questions -- 5:  Water Management Questions -- 5 Should water management activities be done separately by each of the states or as a combined effort? Since the same aquifer underlies both states, it makes sense to have combined management of the resource.

Add a comment

Related presentations

Related pages

Palouse – Wikipedia

Die Palouse ist eine Region in den nordwestlichen Vereinigten Staaten. Sie umfasst Teile des östlichen Washington, des nördlichen Zentral-Idaho und in ...
Read more

Palouse - Wikipedia

Palouse grasslands images at bioimages.vanderbilt.edu (slow modem version) A Palouse Bibliography, Compiled by David M. Skinner, Palouse Prairie Foundation ...
Read more

Palouse Bal Folk

Von Palouse kennt man bisher französische Tanz- und Tafelmusik mit diatonischem Akkordeon, Flöten, Cello, Krummhorn und Percussion. Palouse avec Klaus ...
Read more

City of Palouse – The heart of the Palouse. 99161

The official web site of the City of Palouse. Sponsored by the Palouse Chamber of Commerce.
Read more

Palouse Scenic Byway

208 miles of rolling hills and farmland with rich history, small town charm, spectacular scenic vistas and outstanding recreational opportunities.
Read more

The Palouse - Luminous Landscape

Located just south of Spokane, in Washington state, The Palouse is a rich farming area of some 3,000 square miles. It is somewhat reminiscent of Tuscany ...
Read more

Palouse, Washington - Wikipedia

Palouse is a city in Whitman County, Washington, United States. The population was 998 at the 2010 census. Palouse is named for the region of farmland in ...
Read more

The Palouse Prairie - Palouse Prairie Foundation

The Palouse Prairie The Palouse region The region of southeastern Washington and adjacent Idaho that has rolling hills on deep soils is known as the Palouse.
Read more

Palouse Brand Lentils, Garbanzo Beans, Wheat Berries and ...

Buy Garbanzo Beans, Lentils, Green Split Peas and Wheat Berries from Palouse Brand. Our foods are Non-GMO Project Verified, Certified Kosher & Food Alliance.
Read more

What's the Palouse? - Outdoor Idaho's Palouse Paradise ...

What's the Palouse? The short answer: a 4,000 square mile region of rolling, asymmetrical hills composed of loess, that stretches from north of Lewiston to ...
Read more