Oxygenz report -_2010

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Information about Oxygenz report -_2010
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Published on March 6, 2014

Author: pbrockmyre

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Global Generation Y Workplace survey report

Global WorkPlace Innovation Generation Y and the Workplace Annual Report 2010

Contents LIST OF FIGURES...................................................5 . EXECUTIVE SUMMARY...........................................7 . KEY FINDINGS.....................................................10 INTRODUCTION..................................................13 WHAT IS OXYGENZ..............................................14 Research question..............................................14 WHO ARE THESE YOUNG UPSTARTS?...................17 . WORLD DEMOGRAPHICS. ....................................22 . WHO WHO WHO WHO IS IS IS IS THE THE THE THE GENERATION GENERATION GENERATION GENERATION Y Y Y Y IN IN IN IN USA.....................24 INDIA..................26 . CHINA.................28 UK.......................30 WHO IS THE GENERATION Y?...............................32 Digital, Connected, Social...................................32 Challenging........................................................32 Scarce. ...............................................................33 . Transformational................................................33 DIFFERENCES EMERGE.........................................34 Traditionals........................................................36 Baby Boomers.....................................................36 Generation Y. .....................................................37 . Generation X. .....................................................37 . OXYGENZ RESULTS..............................................46 Choice Of Company............................................48 Location.............................................................50 . Travel.................................................................52 Ways Of Working................................................55 . Creativity & Productivity. ....................................58 . Behind Creativity & Productivity..........................60 Facilities Management........................................62 - Reception & Security.........................................62 - Catering...........................................................64 Environment.......................................................66 Workplace. .........................................................71 . - Style.................................................................71 - Lighting............................................................74 - Art @ Work.......................................................75 Emotional Engagement.......................................78 Workspace..........................................................80 Social Networking...............................................84 Collaboration. .....................................................86 Technology. .......................................................90 . How technology is transforming work.................92 CONCLUSION......................................................94 India...................................................................98 China. ................................................................99 . USA..................................................................100 UK....................................................................101 WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR EMPLOYERS?. 03 1 METHODOLOGY..................................................38 FOOTNOTES. ....................................................106 . DESIGN APPROACH.............................................42 KEY SPONSORS. ................................................110 . BRANDOCRACY. ..................................................44 PARTNERS. ........................................................113 AUTHORS. ........................................................114 . CONTACTS.......................................................117 3 2 Global WorkPlace Innovation Copyright © 2010, Johnson Controls. Confidential. All Rights Reserved. Intellectual Property Johnson Controls, Haworth and iDEA.

List of Figures Figure 1: Who are the Millennials, aka Generation Y?.................................................................................... 19 Figure 2: World Population in 2009.............................................................................................................. 22 . Figure 3: US – Demographic pyramid, 2009................................................................................................. 27 . Figure 4: India – Demographic pyramid, 2009.............................................................................................. 28 Figure 5: China – Demographic pyramid, 2009............................................................................................ 31 . Figure 6: UK – Demographic pyramid, 2009................................................................................................. 32 Figure 7: Choice of Company: per age group, all countries.......................................................................... 48 Figure 8: Choice of Company for 18-25 yrs old............................................................................................ 49 Figure 9: Choice of Company for 18-25 yrs old, key countries..................................................................... 49 Figure 10: Location of the office: per country, 18-25 years old.................................................................... 50 . Figure 11: Location of the office: Generation Y vs. Generation Y.................................................................. 51 Figure 12: Mode of Transport: all ages, all countries.................................................................................... 52 Figure 13: Mode of Transport: per age group, all countries. ........................................................................ 53 . Figure 14: Mode of Transport: per country, 18-25 years old........................................................................ 53 . Figure 15: Choice of car per age group........................................................................................................ 54 . Figure 16: Pattern of Work: Generation Y 18-25 yrs old, all countries. ......................................................... 55 . Figure 17: Preferred Level of Mobility: Generation Y 18-25 yrs old................................................... 56 Figure 18: Pattern of Work: Generation Y 18-25 yrs old, all countries. ......................................................... 56 . Figure 19: Flexible Working Pattern – preferred vs. expected: per age group, all countries. ........................ 57 . Figure 20: Flexible Working Pattern – preferred vs. expected: per country all countries for 18-25 yrs old... 57 . Figure 21: Creativity: per age group, all countries........................................................................................ 58 Figure 22: Productivity: Generation Y, all countries...................................................................................... 59 . Figure 23: Reception Services: Generation Y 18-25 yrs old, all countries...................................................... 62 Figure 24: Level of services across the industry sectors, the age groups, per country.. ............................... 63 . Figure 25: Food Facilities on site, Generation Y, all countries....................................................................... 64 Figure 26: Social Facilities on site, Generation Y, all countries...................................................................... 65 Figure 27: Environmental Workplace: Generation Y 18-25 yrs old, all countries........................................... 66 Figure 28: Environmental requirements for the workplace – per age group, all countries............................ 67 Figure 29a: Environmental requirements per industry sector, 18-25 years old, per countries...................... 67 Figure 29b: Environmental requirements per industry sector, 18-25 years old, per industry sector............. 68 Figure 30: Preferred style in the workplace per age group and country........................................................ 72 Figure 31: Colours on the wall – 18-25 yrs old, all countries........................................................................ 71 Figure 32: Style per gender - 18-25 years old............................................................................................... 73 Figure 33: Finishes per gender – 18-25 years old......................................................................................... 73 Figure 34: Preferred finishes in the workplace per age group and country................................................... 74 Figure 35: Level of Lighting in the office. ...................................................................................................... 75 Figure 36: Level of Art in the workplace - 18-25 yrs old, all countries.......................................................... 76 . Figure 37: Preferences for Art in the workplace per industry sector, 18-25 years old, all countries. ............ 77 . Figure 38: Comfort with Space: all respondents – per country. ..................................................................... 81 Figure 39: Level of comfort with space, sqm per person, 18-25 years old.................................................... 81 Figure 40: Individual workspace: Generation Y 18-25 yrs old, all countries.................................................. 82 Figure 41: Individual space preferred at work, 18-25 years old, per country................................................ 82 Figure 42: Collaborative Environment: Generation Y 18-25 yrs old, all countries......................................... 86 . Figure 43: Access to collaborative spaces, 18-25 years old, per country...................................................... 87 Figure 44: Choice of collaborative space: per age group.............................................................................. 88 Figure 45: Choice of collaborative space: per industry sector, all ages......................................................... 89 Figure 46: The Smart Workplace 2030 – Johnson Controls © 2009. ......................................................92 5 4 Global WorkPlace Innovation Copyright © 2010, Johnson Controls. Confidential. All Rights Reserved. Intellectual Property Johnson Controls, Haworth and iDEA.

Executive Summary The advent of the Generation Y into the workplace is bringing new changes that need to be addressed. The Generation Y is, perhaps, the most digitally sophisticated generation we have ever seen. They are looking for a sustainable environment offering a social structure within both a physical and virtual environment. The generation Y we studied, as we defined aged between 18 and 25, are techno-savvy and motivated and they are bringing with them into the workplace a load of cultural diversity, habits and behaviours inhibited in the way they act, work, communicate, exchange and relate to their environment, people and their management. This report identifies how important the workplace is in attracting, recruiting and retaining Generation Y workers between the age of 18 to 25 years old and what factors contribute to talent management. The report categorises the main factors that appeal to them and help enhance their full potential, under seven categories: Real Estate, Facilities Management, Workplace, Workspace, New Ways of Working, Information Technology and Human Resources. The results prove that:  he Generation Y values sustainability. The T Generation Y is flexible, mobile, collaborative and unconventional.  he Generation Y prioritises opportunities to T learn, work colleagues and corporate culture & value when it comes to deciding for which job to apply for.  he Generation Y prefers workplaces in an T urbanised location with access to social and commercial facilities, good public Infrastructure and the ability to use public transport or drive to work.  The Generation Y prioritises collaboration and interaction in the workplace and requires particularly access to dedicated team spaces as well as ample breakout spaces.  The working environment of the Generation Y is a place they emotionally engage with, a space where they socialise in with other co workers and a space which supports their health and well being.  he Generation Y sees the workplace as a very T important factor and values it as a place of learning and development.  The Generation Y privileges access to their own desk rather than desk sharing or hot desking (hoteling). We must attach a great importance to diversity in our workplaces and the factors that must be taken into account when considering workplaces as a likely strategic weapon in the battle to attract and retain scarce young talent. 7 6 Global WorkPlace Innovation Copyright © 2010, Johnson Controls. Confidential. All Rights Reserved. Intellectual Property Johnson Controls, Haworth and iDEA.

Executive Summary Continued... When it comes to Facilities Management (FM), the preference of Generation Y suggests that FM is not only about managing buildings, but about supporting people. FM service delivery will need to go further in the future to provide high quality people focused services. While the financial benefits of flexible working are clear to business owners, work will have to be done with Generation Y to help them to trade dedicated desks and personalisation for mobility and team oriented spaces. Mobile technology will be an unavoidable support here. The workplace can directly support and influence the Generation Y through a workplace that enables individuals and teams to collaborate and engage with each other, and human resources policies which actively promote flexible working and alternative ways of working:  he workplace must support both formal T and informal collaborative engagement and interaction  The workplace contributes to the level of emotional engagement of individuals with their work The factors contributing to talent attraction and retention are expressed via:  aving the right workplace – location, access H 
Having the right workspace – design, layout, furniture and colours and style  aving the right atmosphere – meeting and H social spaces for interaction and ambiance  aving the right technological platform – H technology provisions, mobile devices  he workplace is important in attracting and T retaining the Generation Y S  ustainable: 96% want an environmentally aware workplace • F  lexible: 56% prefer to work flexibly and chose when to work • M  obile: 79% prefer to be mobile rather than static workers • 
 nconventional: 40% of the U Generation Y would like to take their car to go to work, 20% by public transport and 18% walking! L  ife Long Learning Experience: The reasons for choosing a company are: 1: Opportunities for Learning 2: Quality of Life 3: Work Colleagues • It remains crucially important to understand what things matter most to the 18 – 25 years old. The data reveal a fascinating insight into this new generation and how they are and behave compared to previous one. • • We have yet to feel the full force of this global trend. Will Generation Y continue to be such a special generation, feted and wooed for their talent, if the balance of power reverts to employers as labour markets tighten? Is this new generation of ‘aliens’ and ‘invaders’ really ready to transform our workplace in mega complexes, social hubs and high tech workspaces? Will employers be ready and engage to support these changes? C  ollaborative: 41% of the Generation Y prefers to have access to a team space and 32% prefers breakout spaces rather than a conventional meeting room Having understood these needs:  Employers will find it near on impossible to deliver on all theise demands  Success will be about compromising and determining the essentialsdetermining the essentials  The type of workplace and its location influences the choice of a company  he workspace allocation and technological T provisions contribute to productivity and creativity  he working arrangements must be flexible T and adaptable to satisfy a work life balance they demand 9 8 Global WorkPlace Innovation Copyright © 2010, Johnson Controls. Confidential. All Rights Reserved. Intellectual Property Johnson Controls, Haworth and iDEA.

Key findings per category Travel: Creativity and Productivity: The UK: a nation of walkers The US and India: The car comes first China: Public transport is a prime choice Location:  hina:  he highest demand for rural settings C T The UK: Back to the City and urban settings ndia: Workplaces must be located in urban I setting to attract the younger generations New Ways of Working:  he generation Y is a flexible workforce with a T high level of mobility  oung Women (18-25 years old) prefer more Y flexibility than men  he 46-55 years old are the age group T preferring the most flexible working  he UK and the US Generation Y prefer to work T far more flexibly, while China and India expect to work flexibly  reativity and Productivity: C  reativity is all about having the right PEOPLE C around  roductivity is all about having the right P TECHNOLOGY around  he magic formula is: Technology + Ambiance T & Atmosphere + People = a creative and productive workplace FM support services:  he 18-25 years old are the most demanding T generation India has the most demanding workforce  edia and Finance sectors are the most M demanding industry sectors Women are more demanding than Men Social Spaces: Environment and Sustainability: It is about looking for a green deal at work  eing Green – Working Green – Living Green: B The generation Y is an environmentally friendly workforce  he older generations are far greener than the T younger generations  he Generation Y demonstrates a green T aspiration through their journey to and through work: office location, mean of transport, ways of working, green policies… Workplace:  The Generation Y is an emotionally engaged workforce: Colours should be subtle and not too intense  The light should be natural rather than artificial, calling for wide windows and openings  Finishes should be soft and made out of natural and warm materials, rather than hard material Style:  tyle matters and should be modern rather S than contemporary  omen are more attracted to modern interior W than Men  en are more attracted to minimalist interiors M than Women  rt should be present in the office, but not too A much of it! Workspace:  hey need to identify to and feel they own their T workspace  he large majority still want to have their T own desk  ess than a 1/5th are happy to share a desk L  en are more comfortable in wider space M than women Collaboration: The Generation Y is team focused and places a great importance on work with and amongst a team:  he Art & Design industry is the most eager T to collaborate and Engineering industry is the most team focused industry  hina has the highest demand for breakout C spaces combined with the highest preference for shared and hot desks  35-44 years old have the least requirement for formal meeting rooms  or the Generation Y, the workplace is a social F construction and work is social:  oing to work is about meeting people and G socialising within the working community  he Generation Y is a sporty and social T generation: there is a high demand for sport and social facilities on site. Dr. Marie Puybaraud Johnson Controls Director Global WorkPlace Innovation www.globalworkplaceinnovation.com 11 10 Global WorkPlace Innovation Copyright © 2010, Johnson Controls. Confidential. All Rights Reserved. Intellectual Property Johnson Controls, Haworth and iDEA.

Introduction The Generation Y: Like How They Work - Work How They Like? The newest and youngest members of work forces all over the world are making their presence felt, causing businesses to re-think their working practices and adapt their working environment to this breed of employees and managers. Generation Y is perceived as invading the workplace, arriving like unruly and energetic guests at a stuffy country house party and shocking the house guests who are already there. And they are bringing outsize luggage in the form of multiple digital technologies, their social networks, their tech-savvy culture, new ways of contemplating work, new managerial forms. Who is this generation of “invaders” and “transformers”? How will they or not modify our working environment? What are they expecting from their employer, their work in their workplace and their way of working? 13 12 Global WorkPlace Innovation Copyright © 2010, Johnson Controls. Confidential. All Rights Reserved. Intellectual Property Johnson Controls, Haworth and iDEA.

What is... OXYGENZ is a large-scale research project, which will make a significant contribution to companies’ knowledge on how they might use their real estate and facilities as strategic assets to attract and retain scarce talent. We must attach a great importance to diversity in our workplaces and the factors that must be taken into account when considering workplace as a likely strategic weapon in the battle to attract and retain scarce young talent. 5,375 respondents including: { 3,011 1,298 396 (18 - 25-year-olds) (26 - 35-year-olds) (36 - 45-year-olds) The worldwide survey includes special samples from: US: 1,217 India: 897 China: 660 UK: 607 690 625 And from various key industry Engineering sectors we want to study: Germany: Media, Marketing & Communication 256 736 Finance 491 551 Information Technology Art & Design Research Question: Businesses have to compete to attract, develop, deploy and retain the services of skilled people. It is crucially important to understand what matters to them. In particular, we need to understand what things matter most to Generation Y and the Generation X, the youngest and newly entrants in the workplace. This is exactly what Oxygenz seeks to find out. Oxygenz is an international research project, gathering rich data on Generation Y’s preferences around ways of working and workspace design. rkplace is a research Generation Y and the Wo understand the project that seeks to years old attach to importance the 18 to 25 . their future workplace rkplace in attracting, How important is the wo Generation Y recruiting and retaining ors contribute to workers and what fact industry sector, talent management per country
and gender? 15 14 Global WorkPlace Innovation

Who are these young upstarts? The newest and youngest members of work forces all over the world are making their presence felt, causing many businesses to rethink their working practices. ury: A rising and powerful future workforce of the 21st cent ld, For the first time ever, in workplaces around the wor ther. we understand that four generations are working toge ent Known as Generation Y (aged 15-29), they are the curr entrants into global workforce and estimated at: 1.7 billion worldwide, representing 25.5% of the world population Baby Boomers, the post-world war II generation associated with social change, are beginning to retire in large numbers, taking their knowledge and experience with them. There are not enough of the new generation to replace this deficit, so their knowledge and skills are in demand. There is another major reason why the generation Y is grabbing attention. Many commentators are claiming that Generation Y, as these young people are often called, are setting off a new wave of social and business transformation. For the purpose of this study, we decided to study the Generation Y aged between eighteen and twenty-five, although some people include those born from 1980 onwards, putting the upper limit at twenty-eight. In our view, there are at least six reasons why we need to understand them and how they relate to work. They are a remarkable generation, and here is why...  The demographic data indicate that there are not enough of them coming in to the workforce.  They are transformational – they have grown in a different world to their parents – surrounded by modern technologies and a society of consumerism.  They do things differently – modern educational curricula have brought a wave of transformation in their life.  They are challenging – this is the most commonly agreed threat about this generation, but yet it has not been proved.  They are techno-savvy – the 20th and 21st centuries have brought and will continue to bring the most terrifying and transformational technological solutions to our world.  They are agile – multi-taskers – their agility to do different things at the same time is well known, but it does not mean it makes them more efficient in the way they work. 17 16 Global WorkPlace Innovation Copyright © 2010, Johnson Controls. Confidential. All Rights Reserved. Intellectual Property Johnson Controls, Haworth and iDEA.

workplace divas… energy… innovation… challenging… intellectual challenge… a new reality from work… working flexibly… full of contradictions… conservatist… non-conformist… tech savvy… value driven… money grabbing… The Generation Y apparently believes they can achieve anything. They have been called ‘workplace divas’1&6, millenials, homo zappiens… even Genys! But some say they even are ‘high maintenance, high risk and high output’2&7. They are strongly team-focused, collaborative, and seek meaning in work and opportunity to learn. But also:  They are now under more financial threats than the previous generations since the 2008 and 2009 crisis  They have grown up with green issues into their society, but there is no evidence that it is actually embedded in their culture The majority of the sources describe the Generation Y as consumers, colleagues, employees, managers, and technological and social innovators. The sources explore communication styles, values, motivations, and characteristics, but not many studies focus on the aspirations of this young generation about their future working environment. Although they bring energy and innovation to the workplace, Demographics No definitive agreement on birth years; experts say somewhere between 1978 and 1995; most say 1981 to 1993 the Generation Y is challenging to manage. They appreciate clear direction, demand immediate feedback on performance, expect to be consulted and included in management decisions, and demand constant intellectual challenge. The Generation Y is demanding, as a right, a new reality from work. They insist on working flexibly, choosing when and where to work. Tech-savvy Connected…24/7 Self-confident Millennials at work Work well with friends and on teams Here is an entire cohort secure in the knowledge that their wellto-do Boomer parents can bail them out of financial difficulty. If they don’t like their job they can, and do, chuck it in and head back to live with their parents. tion – a The Impact of Digitaliza rt, KPMG International generation apa Research Report, 2007. Younger siblings of Gen Xers Love a challenge Independent Seek to make a difference Comfortably self-reliant  They quickly buy into new concepts and ideas while new technologies become more affordable, and invade our market at a fast pace Children of Baby Boomers Collaborative, resourceful, innovative thinkers Hopeful  They are more urban focused, and even more in the future with the growth of urbanisation Optimistic Want to produce something worthwhile Determined Goal oriented Largest generation (75 million) after the Boomers (80 million), compared to the Gen Xers (40 million) Success driven Lifestyle centered Diverse Inclusive 38% of millennials identify themselves as “non-white” Global, civic- and community-minded Pulling together Positioned in history to be the next “Hero generation” Service oriented Entrepreneurial Desire to be a hero Impatient Comfortable with speed and change Thrive on flexibility and space to explore Partner well with mentors Value guidance Expect respect Figure 1: Who are the Millennials, aka Generation Y? Source: Deloitte Consulting (2005). Who Are The Millennials, aka Generation Y? 19 18 Global WorkPlace Innovation Copyright © 2010, Johnson Controls. Confidential. All Rights Reserved. Intellectual Property Johnson Controls, Haworth and iDEA.

Although they bring energy and innovation to the workplace, the Generation Y is challenging to manage. They appreciate clear direction, demand immediate feedback on performance, expect to be consulted and included in management decisions, and demand constant intellectual challenge. However most employees would demand the same, generation Y or not! There are at least three reasons why we need to understand Generation Y:  For a start, there are not enough of them. At least that is the case in the US, UK and Europe. As the Baby Boomers retire, there are millions fewer young people to replace them.  What’s more, they are a highly educated and skilled generation. Their already scarce skills are even more in demand in today’s globally networked, creative and knowledge economies. Generation Y’s skills and potential are crucial if economies are to move up the value chain.  The next reason to understand them is the way they use communication technologies, which is creating both challenges and opportunities in the workplace . Having grown up in the Internet age, members of the Generation Y are furious digital innovators. Manuel Castells, the renowned sociologist, and his colleagues see the emergence of a new trend in global youth culture, which they call ‘networked sociability’. Digitally connected or face-to-face, networked sociability is driving the Generation Y to form peer groups that become the context for their individual and collective behaviour5. The Generation Y are full of contradictions, or at least what is written about them is. They think like entrepreneurs and value relationships, are tech-savvy and creative, and are environmentally conscious and mobile8. They will in the future place a high premium on job security9 and they apparently currently job-hop. They are valuedriven and money-grabbing (due to being saddled with high student loans)10. They are conservative11 and non-conformist12. We know that the Generation Y is significant in our society. What else do we know about them? Why are they all that different from their older colleagues? How do they relate to their future working environment. New technologies platforms like Web 2.0 have been adopted by entire generations... the internet, podcasting, Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Google, MSN and SMS are continuously on the mind of the Generation Y. But it also infiltrates other older generations, not only the Generation Y. The majority of the sources describe Generation Y as consumers, colleagues, employees, managers, and technological and social innovators. The sources explore communication styles, values, motivations, and characteristics, but not many focus on the aspirations for their working environment. 21 20 Global WorkPlace Innovation Copyright © 2010, Johnson Controls. Confidential. All Rights Reserved. Intellectual Property Johnson Controls, Haworth and iDEA.

World Demographics % Of World Population 1,723,911,077.00 25.47 Gen x - 30-44 year old 1,442,951,791.00 21.32 Baby Boomers - 5 - 64 years old 1,233,836,150.00 18.56 Traditionalists - 65-74 years old Apparently there is a dearth of Generation Y entering the workforce in Western Europe . In the UK, for example, they are the smallest of the generations in the current total population. Increasing numbers of them are highly educated and their talents, as in the rest of the world, are in demand. Population Gen Y - 15-29 years old As economies and businesses become more knowledge-intensive, knowledge and skills are at a premium. The fact that there are not enough of them only makes their talents even more attractive. Generations 316,330,067.00 4.67 13 Figure 2: World Population in 2009 Source: U.S. Census Bureau, International Data Base14 Worldwide In 2009, if we consider the wider definition of the generation Y (15-29 years old) and rely on current statistical database of the US Census Bureau, the wider Generation Y represents 25.47% of the world population, the wider Generation X (30 to 44) represents 21.32% of the population. The first of the Baby Boomers (45-64 years old) represent 18.55% of the world population and are due to retire in large numbers, starting in 2004, taking their knowledge and experience with them. Countries such as Canada, Australia, and the United States could lose more than a third of their government employees by 201015. Worldwide, within the age group which we research, they are more males than females, especially amongst the young generation (below 25 years old), while the older generation (above 50 years old) has more females than males. The world population increased from 3 billion in 1959 to 6 billion by 1999, a doubling that occurred over 40 years. The Census Bureau’s latest projections imply that population growth will continue into the 21st century, although more slowly. The world population is projected to grow from 6 billion in 1999 to 9 billion by 2043, an increase of 50 percent that is expected to require 44 years. The world population growth rate rose from about 1.5 percent per year from 1950-51 to a peak of over 2 percent in the early 1960s due to reductions in mortality. Growth rates thereafter started to decline due to rising age at marriage as well as increasing availability and use of effective contraceptive methods. Note that changes in population growth have not always been steady. A dip in the growth rate from1959-1960, for instance, was due to the Great Leap Forward in China. During that time, both natural disasters and decreased agricultural output in the wake of massive social reorganization caused China’s death rate to rise sharply and its fertility rate to fall by almost half. In addition to growth rates, another way to look at population growth is to consider annual changes in the total population. The annual increase in world population peaked at about 88 million in the late 1980s. The peak occurred then, even though annual growth rates were past their peak in the late 1960s, because the world population was higher in the 1980s than in the 1960s.’ Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Division 23 22 Global WorkPlace Innovation Copyright © 2010, Johnson Controls. Confidential. All Rights Reserved. Intellectual Property Johnson Controls, Haworth and iDEA.

Who is the Generation Y? Digital, Connected, Social Challenging Scarce Transformational They have grown up with the Internet and mobile communications. They are digitally, globally, and constantly connected. They are driving how mobile communication technologies are used, initiating social behaviours that are transmitted to other generations. Part of the challenge is to manage practices. The Generation Y is said to appreciate clear direction, demand immediate feedback on performance, expect to be consulted and included in management decisions, and demand constant intellectual challenge, opportunities for learning, and meaningful work. In all countries around the world, there are not enough of them. Wherever they are in the world and no matter how large or small their numbers, the signs are that they are setting off a new wave of social and business transformation that will equal or surpass what the Baby Boomers achieved. Generation Y are supposed to be able to navigate vast amounts of data, use multiple digital devices simultaneously and parallelprocess multiple stimuli. They are networked, collaborative and highly social, expecting to be constantly connected to their social networks, within and beyond company boundaries, and to work within a sociable environment with other people. Generation Y’s rapid take-up of digital technologies, how they use them, and how they prefer to work is challenging for business. Part of the challenge is to manage attitudes. Older managers might see technologies such as instant messaging, text messaging, blogging, social networking and multi-player games as a waste of time and a distraction from work. The Generation Y is demanding a new reality from work. They want to work flexibly, choosing when and where to work. Generation Y’s rapid take-up of digital technologies, how they use them, and how they prefer to work is challenging for business34. This is true even in countries like the US, where they are the largest generation since the Baby Boomers - The post World War II generation responsible for social change and unprecedented wealth creation. The problem is that the first of the Baby Boomers were due to retire in large numbers starting in 2008, and are taking their knowledge and experience with them. Countries such as Canada, Australia, and the United States could lose more than a third of their government employees by 201035. This is because they have grown up with the Internet and mobile communications and are digitally, globally and constantly connected. They are driving how mobile communication technologies are used, and they are setting behavioural trends that ripple through and influence social behaviour in other generations. In India, the Generation Y makes up more than half of the population. Despite the large potential workforce, not all are ‘employment ready’ and so their talents are in short supply. There is a dearth of them entering the workforce in Western Europe. In the UK, for example, they are the smallest of the generations in the current total population. Increasing numbers of them are highly educated and their talents, as in the rest of the world, are in demand. Also, as economies and businesses become more knowledge-intensive, knowledge and skills are at a premium. The fact that there are not enough of them only makes their talents even more attractive than they already are. 25 24 Global WorkPlace Innovation Copyright © 2010, Johnson Controls. Confidential. All Rights Reserved. Intellectual Property Johnson Controls, Haworth and iDEA.

Who is the Generation Y in the USA? In all countries around the world, there are apparently too few of them. This is true even in countries like the US, where they are the largest generation since the Baby Boomers - The post-World War II generation responsible for social change and unprecedented wealth creation. According to the 2006 CIA World Fact book, around 27% of the world’s population is below 15 years of age. Tammy Ericsson (http:// tammyerickson.com), writer about the Generation Y in the US, argues that Generation Y will dominate the workforce for the next forty years and beyond. In 2005 in the US, the Generation Y was the fastest-growing segment of the workforce — growing from 14% of the workforce to 21% over the past four years to nearly 32 million workers. 1 in 5 young adults between the ages of 18 and 29 is unemployed, compared with a 7 percent unemployment rate for those over age 30. Twenty-somethings are also graduating from college with more debt than their predecessors did and taking jobs that don’t always come with health insurance (20). Some even said that America’s younger generation is in jeopardy. Figure 3: USA – Demographic pyramid, 2009 Source: U.S. Census Bureau, International Data Base “Despite their shaky finances and breezy approach to workplace demands, the cohort’s strong affinity for personal fame and wealth are likely to translate into serious financial clout over time, to the tune of some $3.5 trillion by middle age. A penchant for instant gratification and customizable products, along with demand for socially responsible corporate policies.” The Adults of Generation Y in the U.S.: Hitting the Demographic, Lifestyle and Marketing Mark, 2008, http://www.marketresearch.com 27 26 Global WorkPlace Innovation Copyright © 2010, Johnson Controls. Confidential. All Rights Reserved. Intellectual Property Johnson Controls, Haworth and iDEA.

Who is the Generation Y in India? In India, they make up the more than half of the population. Despite the large potential workforce, not all are ‘employment ready’ and so their talents are in short supply. The Generation Y in India is a remarkable group that is ambitious, optimistic, embraces change and have a clear sense of where they are headed. Most are ‘entrepreneurial and business savvy, as well as technologically capable and connected21. Highly competitive, Generation Y is more than ever before seeking higher education and landing jobs in multi-national companies in areas such as IT, back office operations, media, strategy and management positions. With opportunities aplenty in the current economy, they are also job-hopping, something not seen in their parents’ generation. With about half of India’s one billion people under the age of 25, Generation Y in India is the world’s largest. Positioned in a time of exciting and rapid economic growth in the country, they are keen to participate in the country’s future and success. The country’s recent parliament elections saw a huge turnout of Generation Y population, demonstrating their ambition to take the country forward. “Gen Ys expect challenging work assignments, accelerated career growth, socially responsible workplaces, flexible work environments, freedom, and collaboration and innovation from their jobs and employers.” R. Anish, Intel’s South Asia HR Director22 Figure 4: India – Demographic pyramid, 2009 25 Source: U.S. Census Bureau, International Data Base Research indicates that as employees, the Generation Y ‘value work life balance more than any other generation’23. Level of engagement among Generation Y employees in India was found to be about the same as the other generations, making them an exception compared to their cohorts around the world. While they are willing to work in shifts to support global operations, they are averse to working long hours24. 29 28 Global WorkPlace Innovation Copyright © 2010, Johnson Controls. Confidential. All Rights Reserved. Intellectual Property Johnson Controls, Haworth and iDEA.

Who is the Generation Y in China? China’s Generation Y is composed of approximately 200 million 15 to 25 year olds. Like their peers around the world, they are a techsavvy, ambitious, multi-tasking, better educated, openminded, individualist cohort that is seeing the country transform from a communist government into an emerging global capitalist market. They are ‘significantly more entrepreneurial and capitalistic than their parent generation’26. The Generation Y has a large exposure to the technological advances in China’s present day, they are connected to the internet, mobile and social networking websites. Heavily influenced by Western culture, they generally know more about Westerners than Westerners know about them. Having grown up as a single child in the One- Child policy era, China’s Generation Y is more inclined toward a lifestyle devoted to freedom and personal satisfaction rather than the more traditional “work hard and get rich” mentality27. The Generation Y is no exception when it comes to valuing work life balance, and working long hours is not something they can adapt to. Entrepreneurial by nature, they would rather start their own business and work for themselves. In the workplace Generation Y are regarded as ‘high achievers, extremely adventurous, impressionable, and consequently highly employable’(??). With many graduating in Engineering and Sciences, there is a high demand for them in multinational companies. The Generation Y’s spending habits are noteworthy. As single children it appears they may be pampered, as findings show they often consume an astonishing 50% or more of family expenditure in some major cities. http://www.publiclibraries.com/authors/mico14/chinageny/ Figure 5: China – Demographic pyramid, 2009 Source: U.S. Census Bureau, International Data Base28 http://www.gallup.com/poll/15934/Chinas-Gen-Bucks-Tradition.aspx 31 30 Global WorkPlace Innovation Copyright © 2010, Johnson Controls. Confidential. All Rights Reserved. Intellectual Property Johnson Controls, Haworth and iDEA.

Who is the Generation Y in UK? More 18 years olds would be available until 2012 to enter the workforce than would leave at 65. The situation reverses in 2012, although the gap between new replacements and numbers of retirees shrinks in the following years to 201631. Of course the whole population is not available to work. The Labour Market Overview for June 2009 indicates a working age employment rate of 73.3 %. Economic inactivity in 18 – 24 year olds has increased as it has in other age groups except 50 to retirement, which has been the only age group to experience a fall32. Apart from lack of employment opportunities linked to the recession, economic inactivity among the 18 – 24 year olds is attributed to a record high of student numbers. As for the 50 to retirement age group, many are remaining in work as long as possible in the face of a pension crisis exacerbated by the recent events in the financial sector. Figure 6: UK – Demographic pyramid, 2009 33 Source: U.S. Census Bureau, International Data Base The overall picture is complex but we can say that if young people continue accessing full-time education, this diminishes the numbers of 18 -24 year olds in the workplace but is partially offset by the older workers postponing retirement. Something else is happening, apart from their insufficient numbers, to make them valuable. 33 32 Global WorkPlace Innovation Copyright © 2010, Johnson Controls. Confidential. All Rights Reserved. Intellectual Property Johnson Controls, Haworth and iDEA.

Differences Emerge A poll of PwC new-starts in China, the US and the UK before they joined the company, uncovers some conservative attitudes. Perhaps the biggest surprise is that an average of 75% of respondents across all the countries expect to keep regular hours, with a figure of 82.5% in the UK. The conservatism continues when respondents were asked how many jobs they expected to have over their lifetimes, which was between two and five reported by 74.4% in China, 80.4% in the US and 79.6% in the UK. This is hardly the job-hopping behaviour suggested in other research. In one survey, 34% said they expected to stay in a job between one and two years, with 57% saying two to three years. In another survey, one in four said they would stay less than four years. These two surveys paint a picture of The Generation Y hungry for opportunity, jumping ship in expectation of experiences that resonate with their workplace priorities, such as having fun, being socially connected, and having the scope to learn and be developed. Employers are having to feed this hunger to attract the best of the Generation Y, branding themselves and tempting the objects of their desire with juicy morsels in the form of ‘employee value propositions’ that align with The Generation Y’ ideal workplace attributes. Of course, the data you get depends on the questions you ask. How accurate is our understanding of Generation Y’s desired workplace attributes? None of the surveys we reviewed asked the Generation Y what they think of their physical work environment. This is consistent with the themes reflected in the wider Generation Y literature. The role of the physical environment in attracting and retaining scarce skills, and in influencing and mediating social interactions, is not always addressed. We know that workplace design matters in nurturing innovation within organisations(37). We also know that quality of place matters to people when choosing where to live and work(38). People look for social conditions and amenities that fit their lifestyles. If it is the case that the Generation Y has strong ethical values, social tendencies, and is highly collaborative, how much does the workplace environment matter to the Generation Y? How important are location, workplace design and environmental considerations in deciding where they want to work and who they want to work for? What should employers do in their workplaces and facilities to recruit, attract and retain the Generation Y? 35 34 Global WorkPlace Innovation Copyright © 2010, Johnson Controls. Confidential. All Rights Reserved. Intellectual Property Johnson Controls, Haworth and iDEA.

Traditionalists (The Veterans or Seniors) Born between the wars, they are a generation of fighters, grounded in traditions, who lived through and fought an unforgettable second world war. Their values and belief is very different from their juniors. Work was a necessity, and they have a strong belief into the company they work for and most of them had a job for life. Offices were not the norm in their professional career. The Generation X The children of the Baby Boomers, born in the late 60s and 70s, they are the one who mostly transformed the office as we know it today, and our relation to work, They occupy today major senior management positions. Offices are a commodity for them, an environment they have seen changing over the last twenty years and not always into the right direction in their mind. This is a generation not always at ease in open offices. Veterans: 1922–1945 Generation X: 1965–1980 Work Ethic / Values: Hard work Respect authority Sacrifice Duty before fun Adhere to rules Communications: Formal Written Work is…: An obligation F  eedback & Rewards: No news is good news Satisfaction in a job well done Leadership Style: Directive Command-and-control M  essages that motivate: Your experience is respected Interactive Style: Individual Work & Family Life: T Source: http://www.fdu.edu/newspubs/magazine/05ws/generations.htm: Work Ethic / Values: Eliminate the task Self-reliance Want structure and direction Skeptical Communications: Direct Immediate Work is…: A difficult challenge A contract F  eedback & Rewards: Sorry to interrupt, but how am I doing? Freedom = best reward Leadership Style: Everyone is the same Challenge others Ask why M  essages that motivate: Do it your way Forget the rules Interactive Style: Entrepreneur Work & Family Life: Balance Source: http://www.fdu.edu/newspubs/magazine/05ws/generations.htm: The Baby Boomers Born during or just after the war, they are the children of the post war. A group of individuals who have seen the world dramatically change in last 50 years, through an industrial revolution, the rise of communication and technologies. Offices were a common working environment in their professional life and they lived through much hierarchical presence in the office. They are still our leaders. They are struggling to embrace new ways of working. The Generation Y (The Millenials) Born around the 80s onwards, they are a generation who has grown in opulence compared to other generations. They are the children of a generation who has greatly benefited from the industrial revolution of the 70s where their wealth and standard have dramatically increased and changed their way of life. This generation has been greatly exposed to modern environments (in their days at school and university) and within their personal life, they have a good standard of living. Open space environment is not a surprise, they have only known this type of environment. Baby Boomers: 1946–1964 Generation Y: 1981–2000 Work Ethic / Values: Communications: In person Work is…: An exciting adventure F  eedback & Rewards: Leadership Style: Consensual Collegial Interactive Style: 36 Workaholics Work efficiently Crusading causes Personal fulfillment Desire quality Question authority Team player Loves meetings Work Ethic / Values: What’s next Multitasking Tenacity Entrepreneurial Tolerant Goal oriented Communications: Email Voice mail Don’t appreciate it Money Title recognition Work is…: A means to an end Fulfillment F  eedback & Rewards: Whenever I want it, at the push of a button Meaningful work M  essages that motivate: You are valued You are needed Leadership Style: The young leaders century M  essages that motivate: Working with other bright, creative people Work & Family Life: No balance Work to live Interactive Style: Participative Work & Family Life: Balance Source: http://www.fdu.edu/newspubs/magazine/05ws/generations.htm: Global WorkPlace Innovation Source: http://www.fdu.edu/newspubs/magazine/05ws/generations.htm: Copyright © 2010, Johnson Controls. Confidential. All Rights Reserved. Intellectual Property Johnson Controls, Haworth and iDEA. 37

Methodology There is a growing realisation, in all areas of life, that the future is not fixed. The workplace plays a critical part in the success of any organisation and has been well researched and now understood. The notion that the future can be ‘shaped’ or ‘created’ has gained currency over the past decade, and is increasingly the basis upon which organisations of all kinds make their plans. At Johnson Controls we have already explored this issue across three major studies on the workplace of 2030 (www. globalworkplaceinnovation.com), to understand where is the workplace going and evolving. And we know it is crucial to understand and take into account multi generational issues at work. Oxygenz was design and launched within one year of the initial idea, developing a new methodology for the data collection, engaging multiple talents and skills from a team of researchers, designers, programmers, graphics and gamers. The programming behind Oxygenz has never been used in this context before and demonstrated a wealth of innovation throughout the design phase. The project was developed in several phases: The methodology behind Oxygenz was defined to target a specific group of individuals, using an unusual and innovative data collection method, never used prior to this study. Our targets were: 2.  July 2007: Design a prototype to test the methodology and mean of collection of the data: using interactive images and key definitions as a mean of collection  Primarily the young generation, between 18 and 25 years old: using technology on a daily basis, social networking applications, interactive games, web 2.0 platforms, mobile technologies…  Multi generations at work: the focus was not only on the Generation Y but also other older generations to run a comparative study across age groups  Across several regions: we needed to communicate with individuals from a wide cultural background and targeted Europe, Middle East, Africa, Asia and Americas  Across different industry sectors: media, art & design, engineering, finance, the built environment, manufacturing, life science and petroleum 1.  February 2007: Design a questionnaire around workplace, using the day in the life of worker as the main stream and using a storyboard 3.  August 2007: Assess the feasibility of the project using this methodology and the efficiency and effectiveness of the interactive design solutions 4.  September 2007: Select appropriate images with the research team, review the questions and test the methodology and research questions 5.  October 2007: Re design the solution to integrate all questions and work around the brand of the project 6.  December 2007: Test the solution with a core group of users and review and amend 7. January 2008: Complete the final solution 8.  February 2008: launch the project across the three targeted regions: Europe, Asia, US 39 38 Global WorkPlace Innovation Copyright © 2010, Johnson Controls. Confidential. All Rights Reserved. Intellectual Property Johnson Controls, Haworth and iDEA.

Methodology Continued The research team: Name Dr. Marie Puybaraud, PhD Simon Russell Adrian Clews Amber Pimm-Jones Andrew Garner Nick Cooper Robin Clarke Role Country studies:  xygenz Project Leader and O Manager Senior Researcher  irector Global WorkPlace D Innovation Johnson Controls  roject Manager for the Design P of Oxygenz Director of Communication iDEA Designer DTP and Graphic Designer Programmer Programmer and Designer Graphic Designer and Brand  esign and Programming Team D iDEA Kate North Project Adviser  ice President Business V Development, eWork (previously Director of Ideation for HAWORTH) Dr. Jay Brand  roject Adviser on behalf of our P research sponsor and partner, Haworth Cognitive Psychologist HAWORTH Dr. Anne Marie McEwan  enior Researcher and adviser S  EO, C The Smart Work Company Eline Leussink Dashboard Development Data analyst Senior Consultant Johnson Controls Malavika Kamath Researcher for Asia Communication Manager Johnson Controls Lewis Beck Data analyst Director of Workplace Johnson Controls The first data analysis using both our reporting tool and the statistical package analysis SPSS, was carried out in July 2008 after a monthly monitoring of the results to assess the reliability of the data and correct any errors or omissions. The number of respondents has grown steadily in one year and a half from the time of the launch to the global data analysis carried out from July 2009 to September 2009. Total All 18-25 years old UK % US % China % India % All=5375 Title & Organisation 607 11.3 1217 22.6 660 12.3 897 16.7 18-25 years old 286 47.1 539 44.3 489 74 718 80 Male 305 50.25 570 46 205 31 613 68 Female 302 49.75 647 54 455 69 284 32 Male 126 44 239 44.3 136 27.8 495 69 Female Studying 160 159 56 55.6 300 420 55.7 77.9 350 330 72.2 67 223 539 31 75 The respondents were targeted via a communication campaign:  Organising launch with our Academic partners in Europe (UK, Germany and The Netherlands), Asia (China and India), the US and South Africa Advertising the Oxygenz survey on Social Networks: Facebook, Google, Twitter, LinkedIn, Hyves  Promoting Oxygenz across our industry and research community via public speeches and presentations Publishing regular articles on the project in the media and press Engaging our employees via internal communications In 12 months of actively promoting the website, we attracted tens of thousands of visitors to our website www.oxygenz.com and collected more than 5,300 respondents completed on line surveys: 45.7% are female and 54.3% of males respondents More than 3,000 respondents are within our targeted age group of 18 to 25 years old in 2009 More than 1000 respondents fit within the generation X age group of 26 to 45 years old in 2009 The database is robust, providing a wide range of participants across our targeted regions and a significant number of respondents within our targeted age group, the 18 to 25 years old in 2009. The dataset also enables to run comparative analysis across age groups (18-25 years old against 26-35 years old…), and across industry sectors and countries, where we have a relevant data sample to study. To date Oxygenz is the largest data sample of respondents across multi regions and industry sectors addressing and sharing their aspirations about the way they would like to work and what are their preferences in the workplace. 41 40 Global WorkPlace Innovation Copyright © 2010, Johnson Controls. Confidential. All Rights Reserved. Intellectual Property Johnson Controls, Haworth and iDEA.

Design Approach More than a questionnaire, Oxygenz offers a unique approach to gather information using an advanced on-line tool:  is interactive and engaging by using a It combination of on-line solutions t uses images and words as a way to I  communicate and ask the question  is educational and enables the users to It discover what work and the workplace are about The Generation Y is, perhaps, the most digitally sophisticated generation we have ever seen. Studies now tell us that more than 80 percent of teenagers have Internet access, and a recent study further predicts that current 10-17-year olds will spend one-third of their lives (23 years) on the Internet. They truly are the children of what was once called the ‘microchip revolution’. As such, they have grown up with computers and using them is second nature. In tests, it has been found that, generally, their hand-eye coordination skills are extremely well developed. The Generation Y, especially in the US, are also the Nintendo Generation – they grew up with video games, with the bright colours, bells and whistles of interactive entertainment. In the video game space, the Generation Y is beginning to expect the easy manipulation of digital environments, by customizing characters (avatars) and directly affecting the digital worlds in which those characters exist. The Generation Y is most likely to be an early adopter. 43 42 Global WorkPlace Innovation Copyright © 2010, Johnson Controls. Confidential. All Rights Reserved. Intellectual Property Johnson Controls, Haworth and iDEA.

Brandocracy When iDEA was approached to produce an online survey we had a very open brief: design the survey to be mainly image-based, work around the journey of the respondent to and through work. iDEA worked with their predominantly Generation Y design team to produce an engaging interactive experience, one that provided as well as collected information. The Generation Y is not only web savvy but also has an unwritten set of rules on how and when to share personal information. Taking this into account, our early recommendations were to create a stand-alone non-corporate brand and invite participates through viral campaigning. The main survey has been designed using Flash to enable the user to interact and travel through the survey in more of an online gaming / learning style than that of a traditional tick box questionnaire. Whilst still maintaining a structured backend database to allow for dynamic online survey interrogation, the survey projects a lighthearted quirky style to encouraging users to engage with the project. As many from our target audience are unfamiliar with Workplace terminology and may have never experienced an office environment, much of the questioning has been formatted to illustrate the terminology used. The survey experience visually builds the user’s perfect office as they progress through the survey. At the end of the survey, they are presented with their office profile in a format they can share with friends on their own social network site. We agreed, to a certain extent, to hide the corporate brand and develop the Oxygenz identity. In addition to the main survey, a Facebook game and several social group applications were developed. Supportive gorilla campaigning added to the non corporate brand image with world landmark stickers being shared on Facebook and Flickr. By linking and sharing related collateral to these social sites, we introduced an element of brand comfort and familiarity. It was essential to create a network of Oxygenzers and maintain their level of engagement throughout the period of the study. The Generation Y don’t just adapt to new ways of doing things in the digital realm, they internalize them and make them their own. 45 44 Global WorkPlace Innovation Copyright © 2010, Johnson Controls. Confidential. All Rights Reserved. Intellectual Property Johnson Controls, Haworth and iDEA.

Oxygenz Results And specifically: This report presents the global results of Oxygenz across a sample of 5,375 respondents from across the world. We seek to understand the importance the 18 to 25 years old ( who fit within the Generation Y group) attach to their future workplace and how different or not they are from their elders, particularly the Generation X, Baby Boomers and Traditionalists. In this report we aim to understand how important is the workplace in attracting, recruiting and retaining Generation Y workers and what factors contribute to talent management per industry sector, country and region?  What are the Generation Y’s preferences about their future workplace?  What workspace design will they prefer?  What technologies will they want to use? H  ow will they prefer to get to and from work?  What other facilities will they prefer to have on site? H  ow important are sustainability initiatives in their choice of employer? H  ow important is having a choice of when and where to work? H  ow will the workplace contribute to their job satisfaction? 47 46 Global WorkPlace Innovation Copyright © 2010, Johnson Controls. Confidential. All Rights Reserved. Intellectual Property Johnson Controls, Haworth and iDEA.

value The alignment of company value and culture and individual and meanings is the key to develop a sustainable career and design a progressive . individual development path Choice of Compan

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