Organizing the Literacy Block

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Information about Organizing the Literacy Block
Education

Published on January 28, 2009

Author: slbc

Source: authorstream.com

Organizing the Literacy Block : Organizing the Literacy Block Rebecca Pilver rpilver@eastconn.org Today’s Outcomes : Today’s Outcomes Learn about four structures for the literacy block Reader’s Workshop Guided Reading Reciprocal Teaching Literature Circles Discuss ways to manage them within the literacy block. The Optimal Learning Model : The Optimal Learning Model To Models, Demonstrations The teacher shows precisely “how to do it” by modeling, explaining, and thinking aloud With Shared, Guided Experiences Students are supported as they work through the “unknown”. Students practice while teacher is on hand to validate, support, teach, provide scaffolds, encourage, help, and give feedback as needed. By Practice, Consolidation, Develop Comfort and Fluency Students use what they have already learned and practiced to problem solve successfully on their own. Learning Contexts : Learning Contexts Readers’ Workshop : Readers’ Workshop Slide 6: Sustained Silent Reading Student chooses any book to read Daily time to read, 10-30 minutes Optional classroom library Book may be below or above reading level No checking by teacher No writing involved No teaching involved No reading goals set Independent Reading Student chooses any book to read, teacher may guide selection Daily time to read, 30 minutes or more Excellent classroom library Students read mostly “just-right” books Teachers monitors comprehension Student keeps a reading record and responds to reading Teaching occurs during minilesson and conference Teacher and student set reading goals Independent Reading : Independent Reading The focus is on learning how to become better readers. It begins with a short minilesson. Students independently read self-selected books at their independent level. Students keep track of their reading. Students may apply the minilesson to their reading. Students respond to their reading. The teacher confers with individual students. It ends with some kind of sharing that ties back to the minilesson. Slide 8: Talking about books is a way to spark students’ interest and introduce them to new texts they might otherwise miss. Minilessons : Minilessons A minilesson is explicit teaching, designed to help students work more productively during independent reading. 3 Types of Minilessons : 3 Types of Minilessons Minilessons on Reading Management Minilessons on Reading Strategies and Skills Minilessons to Promote Literary Analysis Conferences : Conferences To confer means to have a genuine conversation with the reader about how the reading is going. Group Share : Group Share Group share is related to the minilesson. Sometimes individuals share with the whole group; sometimes they share in pairs, threesomes, or small groups. Reading Records and Response Journals : Reading Records and Response Journals Units of Study : Units of Study Comprehension Strategies Author’s Craft Genre Studies Character Development Author Studies Units of Inquiry : Units of Inquiry How do readers understand what they read? Do all readers have the same understanding when they read? What makes a book popular? How do authors create characters? Are all genres equal in importance? Factors Critical to Readers’ Workshop Success : Factors Critical to Readers’ Workshop Success Purpose…..why are we doing this? Relevance….how does this connect to me? Connected…..within the workshop and to other content areas Big Ideas….essential understandings that students walk away with Slide 17: Guiding Questions….a spirit of inquiry Variety….minilessons, responses to literature, texts Community of Readers….book talks, our top 10, organize the library, favorite genres, stop and talk about a great book, Shelfari Ongoing Assessment….makes learning relevant and purposeful Student Goal Setting and Self Assessment….responsibility for own learning Guided Reading : Guided Reading Why Guided Reading? : Why Guided Reading? Slide 20: Research has identified what good readers do as they read. Read the good reader characteristics. Think about your students. Which of these characteristics do all of your students have? Which of these do most of your students have? Some of your students? Few? Code each characteristic with A (all), M (most), S (some), F (few) Slide 21: The purpose of guided reading is to meet the varying instructional needs of all the students in your class. Slide 22: Guided reading is an approach… that is only one part of a differentiated reading program. that enables children to practice strategies with the teacher’s support and that leads to strategic independent reading. in which the text used should not present too many or too varied difficulties, but should offer a moderate challenge. that groups students who demonstrate similar needs and process text at about the same level in which the instruction is specific and focused, finely tuned to the needs and challenges of the particular group. Slide 23: Guided Reading is an approach that enables children to practice strategies with the teacher’s support and that leads to strategic independent reading. Slide 24: What the learner can do with support What the learner can do independently The term “zone of proximal development” is used to describe the experience of a learner who works successfully with the support of another and extends his or her knowledge in the process. The Zone of Proximal Development In the Zone of Proximal Development, the student acquires new learning with the support of an expert other. The student makes the transition from relying on the teacher’s support to applying the learning independently. Slide 25: The Zone of Proximal Development Slide 26: Student independently comprehends literally. Reads grade level texts accurately and with adequate speed and prosody. Not able to make inferences on their own while reading grade level texts. Guided Reading Lesson Teacher guides students through a text at grade level that requires student to inference. Teacher uses questioning to help students connect the literal information in the text to their background knowledge in order to make inferences. Guided Reading Provides the Zone of Proximal Development Slide 27: Types of Text Novels Short Stories Nonfiction Texts Articles Magazines Anthology Textbook Picture Books Slide 28: The Guided Reading Lesson Read a lesson and discuss with a partner: How did the teacher make the new text accessible to the readers? How did the teacher engage the interests, knowledge, or experiences of the readers? Did the teacher provide critical new information or concepts? What did the readers learn to do that will help them process not only this text but other texts better? Slide 29: Guided Reading is an approach in which the text used should not present too many or too varied difficulties, but should offer a moderate challenge. Slide 30: Levels of Text Difficulty Student can read the text alone without support. Student can read with scaffolding and support. NOT TOO EASYNOT TOO FRUSTRATINGHAS SOME CHALLENGE Student cannot read effectively alone or with support. Choose texts from here for guided reading in order to offer challenges and opportunities for growth The Zone of Proximal Development Slide 31: Selecting Text Read the text. Discuss with group and prepare to report out: What challenges does this text present? What type of reader might this text offer just the right kind of support for? Look back at what good readers do. What might this text be good for teaching? In what others ways could this text and similar texts be used in reading and content areas? Literature Circles : Literature Circles Literature Circles : Literature Circles Small temporary groups are formed, based upon book choice Different groups read different books Groups meet on a regular, predictable schedule to discuss their reading Kids use written or drawn notes to guide both their reading and discussion Discussion topics come from the students Group meetings aim to be open, natural conversations about books, so personal connections, digressions, and open-ended questions are welcome In newly-forming groups, students may play a rotating assortment of task roles The teacher serves as a facilitator, not a group member or instructor Evaluation is by teacher observation and student self-evaluation A spirit of playfulness and fun pervades the room. When books are finished, readers share with their classmates, and then new groups form around new reading choices. Literature Circle Minilessons : Literature Circle Minilessons How My Thinking Has Changed Good Discussion Questions Open Questions/Closed Questions QAR Question of the Day Reciprocal Teaching : Reciprocal Teaching A dialogue between students Reciprocal interactions where one person acts in response to the other Structured dialogue for using four strategies: questioning, summarizing, clarifying, predicting Slide 36: How do we know what our students’ needs are? List some of the assessments that you use in reading (informal and formal). Exit Card : Exit Card I learned… I want to try….. I wonder…. One more thing I want to say…..

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