advertisement

Nutrient Mobility 26

100 %
0 %
advertisement
Information about Nutrient Mobility 26
Entertainment

Published on October 4, 2007

Author: Irvette

Source: authorstream.com

advertisement

Nutrient Mobility in Soils:  Nutrient Mobility in Soils Helps us understand when and how much fertilizer to use each year. Helps interpret soil test results. Explains why some nutrients accumulate (soil test increases) in soils over time. Managing N, P, and K:  Managing N, P, and K Mobility in soils (ease of movement with water) is most important. On scale of 1 (immobile) to 10 (moves with water). Nitrate-N = 10 (mobile). Potassium = 3. Phosphate = 1 (immobile). Ammonium-N is like potassium. How does mobility affect amount available from soil?:  How does mobility affect amount available from soil? Mobile nutrients, including water, can be absorbed from a large soil volume. Immobile nutrients, like phosphate, are absorbed from only a small volume of soil. Plant absorption of Water in semi-arid environment.:  Plant absorption of Water in semi-arid environment. Plants absorb moisture from large volume of soil. Natural plant spacing determined by available moisture. Little or no competition among plants in nature. Increasing plant population of crop in semi-arid climate.:  Increasing plant population of crop in semi-arid climate. Increasing plant population of crop in semi-arid climate.:  Increasing plant population of crop in semi-arid climate. Irrigation eliminates competition among plants allows normal plant development, resulting in increased yields. Plant absorption of Nitrogen at low yield level.:  Plant absorption of Nitrogen at low yield level. Plants absorb N from large volume of soil without competition. Increasing plant population (yield goal) of crop creates competition for N.:  Increasing plant population (yield goal) of crop creates competition for N. Increasing plant population (yield goal) of crop creates competition for N.:  Increasing plant population (yield goal) of crop creates competition for N. Fertilizer-N eliminates competition among plants allows normal plant development, resulting in increased yields. Manage Nitrogen according to Yield Goal or Potential Yield.:  Manage Nitrogen according to Yield Goal or Potential Yield. Nitrogen requirement changes directly with changing yield. 2 lb N/bushel of wheat. 15 lb N/stocker per month grazing. 50 lb N/ ton of forage (hay). Increasing grain yield needs more Nitrogen.:  Increasing grain yield needs more Nitrogen. Increasing grain yield needs more Nitrogen.:  Increasing grain yield needs more Nitrogen. Crop absorption of immobile nutrients (P and K).:  Crop absorption of immobile nutrients (P and K). No competition among plants for immobile nutrients at high yield goals.:  No competition among plants for immobile nutrients at high yield goals. If supply of nutrient is adequate for 20 bushel/acre yield, then supply will also be adequate for 40 bushel yield. Plant uptake of immobile nutrients (P and K).:  Plant uptake of immobile nutrients (P and K). Adequacy of immobile nutrient depends on concentration in soil at root surface. Concentration is the same throughout the soil. Soil Test and Plant uptake of P and K.:  Soil Test and Plant uptake of P and K. Soil Test measures concentration throughout the soil (same at root surface). Must be calibrated to relate soil test value to crop response. Soil Test is like Dip Stick for engine :  Soil Test is like Dip Stick for engine Dip Stick. Measures oil level. Not total in crankcase. Critical level=FULL. No benefit from adding more oil. Soil Test. Measures P Concentration. Not total in soil. Critical level=65. No benefit from adding more P. Soil Test-P is like Dip Stick for engine :  Soil Test-P is like Dip Stick for engine Dip Stick. Soil Test (wheat). Soil Test Calibration of P and K.:  Soil Test Calibration of P and K. Dip Stick. Fill crankcase so oil gets to all moving parts. Mark level on dipstick “Full”. Drain 1 quart. Mark dipstick “1 qt.” Drain another quart. Mark dipstick “2 qt.” Soil Test Research. Find soil test level where crop does not respond to P fertilizer. Critical level = 65. Identify soil test where max yield is from 20 lb. Identify soil test where max yield is from 40 lb. Identify soil test where max yield is from 60 lb. Soil Test Calibration of K for Wheat.:  Soil Test Calibration of K for Wheat. *Percentage of yield goal that could be expected if no fertilizer is applied. **Rate assumes broadcast, incorporated application. Soil Test Calibration of K for Bermudagrass.:  Soil Test Calibration of K for Bermudagrass. *Percentage of yield goal that could be expected if no fertilizer is applied. **Rate assumes broadcast application. Soil Test Calibration of P for Wheat.:  Soil Test Calibration of P for Wheat. *Percentage of yield goal that could be expected if no fertilizer is applied. **Rate assumes broadcast, incorporated application. Soil Test Calibration of P for Bermudagrass.:  Soil Test Calibration of P for Bermudagrass. *Percentage of yield goal that could be expected if no fertilizer is applied. **Rate assumes broadcast, incorporated application. Plant uptake of broadcast, incorporated P Fertilizer.:  Plant uptake of broadcast, incorporated P Fertilizer. Only 10 to 15 % of incorporated P fertilizer is absorbed by crop. 85 to 90 % of P fertilizer reacts with soil to “build up” soil test over time. Mobility Concept Conclusions.:  Mobility Concept Conclusions. N fertilizer should be applied in relation to yield goal. N soil test values may change greatly from year to year. Mobility Concept Conclusions.:  Mobility Concept Conclusions. P and K fertilizer should be applied in relation to calibrated soil test. Soil test values do not change much from year to year. 10 (sandy) to 20 (fine textured) lbs P2O5/acre, above crop uptake, to raise soil test value 1 unit (e.g. from 40 to 41).

Add a comment

Related presentations

Related pages

Knowing nutrient mobility is helpful in diagnosing plant ...

Knowing nutrient mobility is helpful in diagnosing plant nutrient deficiencies Nutrients important for plant growth vary in their ability to move within ...
Read more

What forms the basis of nutrient mobility in plants ...

What forms the basis of nutrient mobility in plants ... Two-year dynamics of foliage labelling in 8-year-old Pinus pinaster trees with (15)N, (26)Mg and ...
Read more

ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS, MOBILITY AND pH EFFECT

docslectsuplNutrientnutrient page 74 ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS, MOBILITY AND pH EFFECT essential element - an element required by plants for normal growth ...
Read more

Nutrient Transport in the Soil-Plant System

Nutrient Transport in the Soil-Plant System Nutrient Transfer in Soil to Root Surface Readings: Marschner pp 484-500 In this section of the course we ...
Read more

Influence of soil water regime on nutrient mobility and ...

Influence of soil water regime on nutrient mobility and uptake by Dalbergia sissoo seedlings ... (AFRI) Jodhpur (26° 45′ N latitude and 72° 03′ E
Read more

Soil Nutrients Macronutrients - Home | Oregon State ...

Soil Nutrients • Of all the ... Nutrient Mobility in Soil • Mobile •NO3-, SO 4 2-, B(OH) 3, Cl- ... 26 B-deficient apple Source: Bennett, W.F. 1993.
Read more

Adobe Connect Links — SOIL 4234 Soil Nutrient Management

Adobe Connect Links Links to ... 8-28 Link Solubility based on charge, Nutrient Mobility, ... 10-26 Link Phosphorus
Read more

Managing grapevine nutrition and vineyard soil health

Managing grapevine nutrition and vineyard soil health Table 1 The major nutrients required for grapevine vegetative and reproductive growth Nutrient Function
Read more