Noble Gases

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Information about Noble Gases
Education

Published on October 4, 2008

Author: Chelsealex

Source: slideshare.net

Description

This gives a brief overview of the noble gases. (includes animations on 2nd slide)

By Alex && Mel Noble Gases

 

 

Atomic Number: 2 Melting Point: -272.0 °C (1.15 K, -457.6 °F) Boiling Point: -268.6 °C (4.549994 K, -451.48 °F) Number of Protons/Electrons: 2 Number of Neutrons: 2 Density @ 293 K: 0.1785 g/cm 3 Date of Discovery: 1895 Discoverer: Sir William Ramsay Name Origin: From the Greek word hêlios (sun) Uses: balloons, deep sea diving Obtained From: natural gas deposit, air The dangers of inahing helium are rare, but if you don't breathe for 5 seconds in between, you could get a soar throat or maybe pass out. Can't be made into compounds

Atomic Number: 10 Atomic Mass: 20.1797 amu Melting Point: -248.6 °C (24.549994 K, -415.48 °F) Boiling Point: -246.1 °C (27.049994 K, -410.98 °F) Number of Protons/Electrons: 10 Number of Neutrons: 10 Density @ 293 K: 0.901 g/cm 3 Date of Discovery: 1898 Discoverer: Sir William Ramsay Name Origin: Form the Greek word neos (new) Uses: lighting Obtained From: liquid air The danger is Asphyxiation but that is very rare. Can't be made into compounds.

Atomic Number: 18 Atomic Mass: 39.948 amu Melting Point: -189.3 °C (83.85 K, -308.74 °F) Boiling Point: -186.0 °C (87.15 K, -302.8 °F) Number of Protons/Electrons: 18 Number of Neutrons: 22 Density @ 293 K: 1.784 g/cm 3 Date of Discovery: 1894 Discoverer: Sir William Ramsay Name Origin: From the Greek word argon (inactive) Uses: Lighting Obtained From: air Argon has the opposite effect as helium on your voice. Because it is so dense - it makes your voice lower. Which means it has the same dangers as helium. Can't be made into compounds.

Krypton is not toxic, but in an enclosed environment, it can displace air and cause asphyxiation. Can't be made into compounds. Atomic Number: 36 Atomic Mass: 83.8 amu Melting Point: -157.2 °C (115.950005 K, -250.95999 °F) Boiling Point: -153.4 °C (119.75001 K, -244.12 °F) Number of Protons/Electrons: 36 Number of Neutrons: 48 Density @ 293 K: 3.74 g/cm 3 Date of Discovery: 1898 Discoverer: Sir William Ramsay Name Origin: From the Greek word kryptos (hidden) Uses: Lighting Obtained From: production of liquid air

The xenon lights in cars hurt peoples eyes which can be dangerous but they aren't harmful. In 1962 the first noble gas compound was produced by Neil Bartlett, combining xenon, platinum and fluorine. It is now possible to produce xenon compounds in which the oxidation states range from +2 to +8(!). Atomic Number: 54 Atomic Mass: 131.29 amu Melting Point: -111.9 °C (161.25 K, -169.42 °F) Boiling Point: -108.1 °C (165.05 K, -162.58 °F) Number of Protons/Electrons: 54 Number of Neutrons: 77 Density @ 293 K: 5.8971 g/cm 3 Date of Discovery: 1898 Discoverer: Sir William Ramsay Name Origin: From the Greek word xenon (stranger) Uses: powerful lamps, bubble chambers Obtained From: liquid air

Atomic Number: 86 Atomic Mass: (222.0) amu Melting Point: -71.0 °C (202.15 K, -95.8 °F) Boiling Point: -61.8 °C (211.35 K, -79.24 °F) Number of Protons/Electrons: 86 Number of Neutrons: 136 Density @ 293 K: 9.73 g/cm 3 It is radioactive and is naturally formed like oxygen which means it is everywhere it is around wherever air is allowed to stagnate. Can't be made into compounds. Date of Discovery: 1898 Discoverer: Fredrich Ernst Dorn Name Origin: From radium Uses: treatment of cancer Obtained From: decay of radium

By Mel & Alex :] :]

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