niamhmurphyActivefor HealthseminarMarch20 08

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Published on May 2, 2008

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Active for Health Seminar, 4/3/2008 Mass sporting and physical activity events -a public health opportunity? -an opportunity for partnership?:  Active for Health Seminar, 4/3/2008 Mass sporting and physical activity events -a public health opportunity? -an opportunity for partnership? Niamh M Murphy Department of Health, Sport and Exercise Science, School of Health Sciences, Waterford Institute of Technology, Waterford, Ireland Prof Adrian Bauman, Centre for Physical Activity and Health, School of Public Health, University of Sydney Aoife Lane, Dept of Health, Sport and Exercise Science, WIT International review of national PA policy (2003/2004):  International review of national PA policy (2003/2004) Assessment of current or emerging national policy approaches to increasing population levels of physical activity for a selected group of countries: Australia, New Zealand, Canada, Switzerland, Netherlands, Scotland, Brazil Source: Bull FC, Bellew B, Schoppe S, Bauman AE. (2004) Developments in national physical activity policy: an international review and recommendations towards better practice. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Physical Activity Suppl, 7(1), 93-104. Global policy docs related to PA:  Global policy docs related to PA - WHO Global Strategy on Diet, Physical Activity and Health/DPAS (2004) - A Guide for Population-based Approaches to Increasing Levels of Physical Activity: implementation of the DPAS (2007) Slide9:  Goals and objectives High-level political commitment Elements for success! Funding Support from stakeholders Cultural sensitivity Integration of PA within other sectors A coordinating team Multiple intervention strategies Target whole population + specific population groups National PA guidelines Dissemination Clear identity Monitoring + Evaluation Implementation at different levels Leadership + workforce development Regional PA networks:  Regional PA networks HEPA Europe / European Network for the Promotion of Health-enhancing Physical Activity (Italy, 2004) RAFA – PANA (Red de Actividad FÍsca de las Américas, Physical Activity Network of the Americas (Brazil, 2002) APPAN / Asia Pacific Physical Activity Network (Australia, 2006) In sport In health…we put a lot of time, money, energy into organising events :  In sport In health…we put a lot of time, money, energy into organising events for lots of good reasons…… such as…opportunities for participation, to showcase sporting prowess, to increase profile and awareness, for economic benefits, trickle down effects post-event on PA etc Do events pay off in terms of a more active population??:  Do events pay off in terms of a more active population?? Do events – elite “mega-events”, such as the Olympic Games through to “mass sporting events” -influence the physical activity behaviour of the population? Community “euphoria” that translates into motivation for PA? Slide13:  Murphy N and Bauman A. Mass sporting and physical activity events – are they “bread and circuses” or public health interventions to increase population levels of physical activity ? Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 2007, 4; 193-202. Events defined in our review as short-term, discrete, and organized, rather than longer term purposive community-wide campaigns The categories of events reviewed ::  The categories of events reviewed : elite sporting events, such as the Olympic Games or World Cup soccer (population involved as spectators). non-elite mass events, including city road races and biking events (potential for community-wide participation) major general-population health promotional events, such as Walk or Ride to Work Days [excluded smaller ‘try activity’ events] Slide15:  The effects of major sporting events on physical activity Slide16:  Did the 2000 Olympics make a difference in population levels of PA participation ? Effect of the Sydney Olympic Games on Physical Activity participation levels among Australian Adults. Adrian Bauman, Tim Armstrong, Ian Ford, Joanne Davies, Australian Institute of Health, Canberra; School of Community Medicine, UNSW, Sydney, Australian Instit. of Sport, Canberra Methods :  Methods Three serial national PA surveys by phone in November 1997, 1999 and 2000 (N=4824,N=3842,N=3590 resp; response rates 61%, 65%, 76% resp.) Standard Active Australia questions asked about walking, moderate and vigorous PA recalled in the past 7 days. NSW residents not affected any differently to other Australians! Percentage of people achieving 150 mins/week of at least moderate PA, by gender:  Percentage of people achieving 150 mins/week of at least moderate PA, by gender * p <0.01 for 1997 to 1999 ** p<0.05 for 1999 to 2000 Implications of these data :  Implications of these data ‘Net gain’ of Olympics as a Public Health intervention was negligible Olympics alone NOT a solution Slide20:  Sydney Olympics: no evidence for a ‘trickle down’ effect or ‘rising of the couch potatoes’ among Australian adults. Population data collected following the Manchester 2002 Commonwealth Games demonstrated no impact on participation in sports activities Process evaluation outcomes often assessed, i.e.reports of increases in sports club membership following 1992 Barcelona Olympics 1994 Soccer World Cup 2002 Winter Olympics The impact of ‘mass participation’ events on physical activity participation:  The impact of ‘mass participation’ events on physical activity participation Few provide evaluation data! No evaluations assessed pre-event PA patterns, or tracked the post-event PA of participants. Data collected following mass events to promote active travel demonstrated modal shifts in active commuting (Merom et al, 2005a and 2005b). Flora Women’s Mini marathon Physical Activity Survey 2007:  Flora Women’s Mini marathon Physical Activity Survey 2007 Key Research Questions Does the event encourage women to become more active before and after the event, and/or in the long term? Does the event attract women who are already active? Do women stay active after the event (2 and 6 months later). Can we do anything to maintain post-event PA levels? Funded by the Irish Sports Council The women in our survey…:  The women in our survey… n = 11,205 at baseline n=4,786 2 months post-event n=2,095 6 months post-event n = 414 race day interviews . ,Survey based on IPAQ, SLAN 2006, new ISC Sports Monitor (so we have comparable data) Funded by Irish Sports Council. Project team N Murphy, A Lane, J McArdle, A Muldoon (all WIT), and A Bauman, H Bowles (CPAH, Univ of Sydney) Findings in brief…:  Findings in brief… 41% of participants walk the event. 38% were first time mini marathon participants. 70% said that ‘raising money for charity’ was their main reason for taking part. 60% took up activity just before the event How active are participants?:  How active are participants? 25% were categorised as ‘low active’. 45% were categorised as ‘moderately active’, with the remaining 30% categorised as high active. The challenge is to get the ‘low active’ women exercising! When the June event is over, many in this group revert to ‘low activity’ (2 and 6 month follow up). What women want!:  What women want! More organized local events (perhaps with childcare provided!), More meet and train groups Support (mail, e-mail, personal contact) to help motivate them. 2008 RCT will target low active women and ‘relapsers’ to provide answers as to whether these strategies work or not! Other potential event effects :  Other potential event effects Physical facilities, and supporting infrastructure (such as social interaction and social capital) Development of sporting infrastrucure (No analyses of the impact of these environmental changes on subsequent PA participation of host communities. Only process evaluation data are available –e.g. Manchester 2002 Commonwealth Games) Alleged social and community benefits (such as active “culture” ) Civic pride, social regeneration Volunteerism (Data from Manchester indicate that volunteers were mostly Caucasian (92%) who already were active ) Major events – stimulus to active nation, or bread and circuses? :  Major events – stimulus to active nation, or bread and circuses? Little evidenced impact on population-level PA participation (in spite of considerable claims! e.g. the London 2012 bid). Data are limited to process evaluations of sporting club membership, environmental infrastructure development, volunteers and community capacity Waitt likened the Sydney Olympics to the ancient Roman notion of “bread and circuses” - social control maintained by appeasing the populace with culturally-reinforcing sporting entertainments. Challenges and opportunities for partnership between sport and health Potential sport-health partnerships:  Potential sport-health partnerships Harness the ‘euphoria’ around major events (e.g.Cricket World Cup, Ryder Cup) Sporting role models? (see Payne et al review) Huge marketing opportunities provided by mega-events to promote the PA message Measure who events attract and how active they remain post-event. Framework for evaluation developed (JPAH, 2007, 4; 193-202) Embed events in organized inter-agency campaigns, supported by community-wide programs, coherent policies, and supportive environments

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