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Modeling Activation

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Information about Modeling Activation
Technology

Published on February 28, 2014

Author: PhilipJung

Source: slideshare.net

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Oracle® Communications Design Studio Modeling Activation Release 3.1.1 E14859-01 April 2010 Beta Draft

Oracle Communications Design Studio Modeling Activation, Release 3.1.1 E14859-01 Copyright © 2006, 2010, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. This software and related documentation are provided under a license agreement containing restrictions on use and disclosure and are protected by intellectual property laws. Except as expressly permitted in your license agreement or allowed by law, you may not use, copy, reproduce, translate, broadcast, modify, license, transmit, distribute, exhibit, perform, publish, or display any part, in any form, or by any means. Reverse engineering, disassembly, or decompilation of this software, unless required by law for interoperability, is prohibited. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice and is not warranted to be error-free. If you find any errors, please report them to us in writing. If this software or related documentation is delivered to the U.S. Government or anyone licensing it on behalf of the U.S. Government, the following notice is applicable: U.S. GOVERNMENT RIGHTS Programs, software, databases, and related documentation and technical data delivered to U.S. Government customers are "commercial computer software" or "commercial technical data" pursuant to the applicable Federal Acquisition Regulation and agency-specific supplemental regulations. As such, the use, duplication, disclosure, modification, and adaptation shall be subject to the restrictions and license terms set forth in the applicable Government contract, and, to the extent applicable by the terms of the Government contract, the additional rights set forth in FAR 52.227-19, Commercial Computer Software License (December 2007). Oracle USA, Inc., 500 Oracle Parkway, Redwood City, CA 94065. This software is developed for general use in a variety of information management applications. It is not developed or intended for use in any inherently dangerous applications, including applications which may create a risk of personal injury. If you use this software in dangerous applications, then you shall be responsible to take all appropriate fail-safe, backup, redundancy, and other measures to ensure the safe use of this software. Oracle Corporation and its affiliates disclaim any liability for any damages caused by use of this software in dangerous applications. Oracle is a registered trademark of Oracle Corporation and/or its affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners. This software and documentation may provide access to or information on content, products, and services from third parties. Oracle Corporation and its affiliates are not responsible for and expressly disclaim all warranties of any kind with respect to third-party content, products, and services. Oracle Corporation and its affiliates will not be responsible for any loss, costs, or damages incurred due to your access to or use of third-party content, products, or services. This documentation is in prerelease status and is intended for demonstration and preliminary use only. It may not be specific to the hardware on which you are using the software. Oracle Corporation and its affiliates are not responsible for and expressly disclaim all warranties of any kind with respect to this documentation and will not be responsible for any loss, costs, or damages incurred due to the use of this documentation.

Contents 1 Getting Started with Studio for ASAP Understanding ASAP Users and Tasks................................................................................................ 1-1 Configuring Activation Network Cartridges...................................................................................... 1-3 Configuring Activation Service Cartridges......................................................................................... 1-5 2 Creating Activation Cartridge Projects Understanding Source Control.............................................................................................................. 2-1 Understanding Activation Network Cartridges................................................................................. 2-2 Understanding Activation Service Cartridges.................................................................................... 2-2 Setting Up Activation Cartridges .......................................................................................................... 2-2 Understanding Cartridge Export ........................................................................................................... 2-3 Exporting Cartridges ......................................................................................................................... 2-4 Importing Cartridges ............................................................................................................................... 2-4 Understanding Sealed Cartridges.................................................................................................... 2-6 Understanding Cartridge Read-Only Status.................................................................................. 2-6 Importing Cartridges from Cartridge Projects .............................................................................. 2-7 Importing Cartridges from SAR Files ............................................................................................. 2-8 Importing Cartridges from Environments ..................................................................................... 2-8 Activation Cartridge Editor .............................................................................................................. 2-9 Removing Cartridge Projects .............................................................................................................. 2-11 Renaming Cartridge Projects ............................................................................................................. 2-11 3 Modeling ASAP Services Modeling Services for Activation Network Cartridge...................................................................... 3-2 Modeling Services for Activation Service Cartridges using a Common Service Model ........... 3-2 Modeling Services for Activation Service Cartridges using a Mixed Service Model................. 3-2 Understanding Vendor, Technology, and Software Load-Specific Service Models .................... 3-3 Understanding Common Service Models ........................................................................................... 3-4 Understanding Mixed Service Models ................................................................................................ 3-7 Creating Model Elements ....................................................................................................................... 3-7 Understanding Model Element Relationships................................................................................... 3-9 Modeling Services Example 1........................................................................................................ 3-10 Modeling Services Example 2........................................................................................................ 3-12 Configuring Element Properties ........................................................................................................ 3-13 Defining Action Processor Properties .......................................................................................... 3-13 Beta Draft iii

Defining Atomic Action Properties .............................................................................................. Defining Service Action Properties .............................................................................................. Generating Framework Models.......................................................................................................... Generating Framework Models for Activation Network Cartridges...................................... Generating Framework Models for Activation Services Cartridges ....................................... Documenting Models ........................................................................................................................... 3-14 3-15 3-15 3-16 3-17 3-18 4 Modeling Implementations Implementing the Action Processor ..................................................................................................... 4-1 Understanding Java with Code Generation ................................................................................... 4-2 About Processor Classes and Interfaces .................................................................................. 4-3 Example: Typical Processor Call Sequence ............................................................................ 4-7 Understanding the Java Processor Class ........................................................................................ 4-8 Writing Java Processor Execute Method Logic....................................................................... 4-9 Java Processor Class Example ................................................................................................... 4-9 Understanding Java Libraries in Studio ...................................................................................... 4-12 Understanding Unit Testing.......................................................................................................... 4-13 Running Unit Test Cases......................................................................................................... 4-15 Running Unit Tests with the JDT Debugger........................................................................ 4-15 Understanding Unit Test Property Files............................................................................... 4-15 Configuring a Unit Test .......................................................................................................... 4-17 Implementing Java NE Connection Handlers ................................................................................. 4-18 Creating New NE Connection Handlers ..................................................................................... 4-18 Generating a Telnet NE Connection Handler Implementation ............................................... 4-19 Generating a Custom NE Connection Handler Implementation............................................. 4-19 Implementing User-Defined Exit Types ........................................................................................... 4-20 Creating New User-Defined Exit Types ...................................................................................... 4-20 Configuring User Defined Exit Types.......................................................................................... 4-21 Understanding User-Defined Exit Type Extensions.................................................................. 4-21 Understanding Custom Action Processors....................................................................................... 4-24 Creating Custom Action Processors............................................................................................. 4-25 Understanding Retry Properties......................................................................................................... 4-25 Example 1: Configuring Retry Properties at the NE Instance Level........................................ 4-26 Example 2: Configuring Retry Properties at the Atomic Action Level ................................... 4-27 Understanding Network Element Instance Throughput Control ............................................... 4-28 Configuring Network Element Instance Throughput Control................................................. 4-29 5 Modeling Network Elements Understanding Network Elements ....................................................................................................... Configuring Network Element Models ............................................................................................... Creating NE Templates ..................................................................................................................... Creating Network Elements based on an NE Template............................................................... Creating Dynamic NE Templates .................................................................................................... 5-1 5-2 5-2 5-3 5-3 6 Packaging and Deploying ASAP Cartridges Packaging Activation Cartridge Implementations ............................................................................ 6-1 iv Beta Draft

Creating Activation Environment Projects.......................................................................................... Creating Activation Environments ....................................................................................................... Deploying Cartridges and Managing the ASAP Environment....................................................... Mapping Network Element Processors................................................................................................ Creating New NEP Map Entities ..................................................................................................... Configuring NEP Maps..................................................................................................................... 6-2 6-2 6-3 6-4 6-5 6-5 7 Testing ASAP Cartridges in Studio Creating Activation Test Cases .............................................................................................................. Running an Activation Test Case .......................................................................................................... Understanding Test Case Configuration ........................................................................................ Running Test Cases from the Activation Test Case Editor .......................................................... Running Test Cases from the Cartridge Editor ............................................................................. 7-1 7-3 7-3 7-4 7-4 8 Documenting Cartridges Generating a Network Cartridge Guide .............................................................................................. 8-1 Editing Topic Overviews in the Cartridge Guide ......................................................................... 8-2 Beta Draft v

vi Beta Draft

1 Getting Started with Studio for ASAP 1 Studio is an optional Activation component that simplifies the creation, assembly, and deployment of services across multiple domains. It is a powerful graphical tool that dramatically reduces the time-to-market for new services. Studio offers support for the activities performed by a wide variety of users including business analysts, service modelers, network element administrators, deployment managers and cartridge developers. Studio functionality includes: ■ Create, deploy and manage cartridges. ■ Extend cartridges into customer specific service configurations. ■ ■ ■ Manage and deploy complex multi-domain services to production, test and development environments. Rapidly model network element instances using pre-defined network element instance and connection attributes. Support for creation and deployment of patches. The services that can be modeled in Studio are typically those that are provided to end users of telecommunications networks, such as voice services (including wireless, voice over IP), data services (including digital subscriber line, IPTV), or any other services that require controlled and coordinated activation in the network. These services are modeled in Studio by defining and relating objects at different levels of abstraction. Related Topics Understanding ASAP Users and Tasks Configuring Activation Network Cartridges Configuring Activation Service Cartridges Understanding ASAP Users and Tasks The users of Studio Activation belong to the following user groups: Business Analysts Business analysts are responsible for describing the features and services associated with marketing products and communicating this to the users responsible for building these products. The business analyst may simply name and describe products and pass this product description to a service modeler, or may perform basic service modeling tasks in Studio. This involves the following tasks: Beta Draft Getting Started with Studio for ASAP 1-1

Understanding ASAP Users and Tasks Task Reference Defining elements (service actions, atomic actions, action processors) Creating Model Elements Defining relationships between elements Understanding Model Element Relationships Understanding Model Element Relationships Generating Framework Models Service Modelers Service modelers are responsible for configuring the service model. This involves the following tasks: Task Reference Load (import) cartridges Importing Cartridges from Cartridge Projects Importing Cartridges from SAR Files Importing Cartridges from Environments Setting up an Activation Service Cartridge Setting Up Activation Cartridges Designing a service model Understanding Vendor, Technology, and Software Load-Specific Service Models Understanding Common Service Models Understanding Mixed Service Models Creating Model Elements Understanding Model Element Relationships Generating Framework Models Extending user defined exit types Implementing User-Defined Exit Types Creating Custom action processors Creating Custom Action Processors Configuring Network Elements Modeling Network Elements Build, deploy and undeploy to/from development environments Packaging and Deploying ASAP Cartridges Deployment Managers Deployment managers are responsible for build management and are usually advanced users of the version control system. Deployment managers should be familiar with the tools that Studio provides to interface with the version control system and should understand how to package items from source control and build and deploy configurations to ASAP environments. Activities performed by deployment managers in Studio may include: Task Reference Build, deploy and undeploy to/from test and production environments Packaging and Deploying ASAP Cartridges Configuring the development environment Understanding Source Control 1-2 Modeling Activation Beta Draft

Configuring Activation Network Cartridges Cartridge Developers Cartridge developers use Studio to create ASAP Network cartridges from scratch. ASAP Network cartridges are generally productized cartridges, but this activity can also be performed by the customer or by system integrators. Task Reference Setting up an Activation Network Cartridge Setting Up Activation Cartridges Defining and editing elements (service actions, atomic actions, action processors) Creating Model Elements Defining relationships between elements Understanding Model Element Relationships Developing the implementation Implementing the Action Processor Understanding Model Element Relationships Generating Framework Models Implementing User-Defined Exit Types Implementing Java NE Connection Handlers Configuring Sample Network Elements Modeling Network Elements Build, deploy and undeploy to/from development environments Packaging and Deploying ASAP Cartridges Related Topics Getting Started with Studio for ASAP Configuring Activation Network Cartridges Studio supports three types of Activation cartridges: ■ ■ ■ Activation Network cartridges. See Understanding Activation Network Cartridges for more information. Activation Service cartridges. See Understanding Activation Service Cartridges for more information. Activation SRT cartridges. See Understanding Activation SRT Cartridges. for more information. The procedure below, with links to detailed topics, outlines the basic steps you need to follow to create an Activation Network cartridge. To create an Activation Network cartridge 1. Create an Activation Cartridge project and set up the Activation Network cartridge. a. b. 2. Use the Activation Network cartridge project wizard to create an Activation Network Cartridge project and display it in the Cartridge view of the Design Perspective. See Setting Up Activation Cartridges for more information. Configure the cartridge details in the Activation Network Cartridge editor. See Activation Cartridge Editor for more information. Define and edit the elements. Beta Draft Getting Started with Studio for ASAP 1-3

Configuring Activation Network Cartridges a. Create service actions, atomic actions, and action processors as elements for the model. See Creating Model Elements for more information. The elements can be created with a wizard, but you would normally use the simpler and more efficient Cartridge Generation feature, which creates the elements and also links them. See Generating Framework Models for more information. b. For elements that you created with a wizard, define their relationships by manually linking service actions, atomic actions, and action processors, and define the element parameters. For elements that you created with the Cartridge Generation feature, the linking process is automated, and elements are automatically created and linked. See Understanding Model Element Relationships for more information. c. Add information that will be used for auto-generation of documentation for the model. See Documenting Cartridges for more information. 3. Implement the action processor. a. Define a java action processor implementation. Use the Java with code generation implementation to write the logic in the execute method of the processor class (the proxy automatically performs several steps of code generation). See Understanding Java with Code Generation and Understanding the Java Processor Class for more information. Configure java libraries. See Understanding Java Libraries in Studio for more information. b. Use the Unit Test procedure to generate a test case, which enables you to test the processor outside of the ASAP environment. Configure a Unit test for the processor. See Testing ASAP Cartridges in Studio. 4. Configure the user-defined exit types (UDET). See Configuring User Defined Exit Types for more information. a. b. 5. Create UDETs as elements for the model. Configure the UDETs in the editor to define the content. Implement the connection handler. Write a Java Connection Handler. See Generating a Telnet NE Connection Handler Implementation and Generating a Custom NE Connection Handler Implementation for more information. 6. Define the network element (NE) model. See Modeling Network Elements for more information. You must create and configure at least two of the following elements (all three concepts are related as they involve connection to equipment): a. NE templates. A template that can be copied to create one or many specific NEs. b. Network elements. An NE represents one specific piece of equipment (a single instance) in the network. A connection pool contains one or more connections that can be use 1-4 Modeling Activation Beta Draft

Configuring Activation Service Cartridges to connect to the network element (possibly simultaneously). Each network element has a single connection pool associated with it. c. Dynamic NE templates. In some cases it is not ideal to configure static network element instances for a specific customer solution. In such cases, dynamic NE templates can be configured allowing network element attributes to be dynamically sent to A5 on work orders. Dynamic NE templates are used when upstream systems (such as Inventory) contain the necessary information to connect to the network element instance. Passing this information to A5 dynamically avoids having to configure it in multiple locations (e.g. in A5 as well as in an inventory system). 7. Package the cartridge. See Packaging Activation Cartridge Implementations for more information. a. Model the packaging. Use the Cartridge editor to specify which elements will be included in the cartridge (SAR file). b. c. Include JARs in the SAR. d. 8. Create the JAR with ANT. Put external JARs in the NEP classpath on the ASAP server. Deploy the cartridge. See Deploying Cartridges and Managing the ASAP Environment for more information. a. Create an Activation Environment project and an Activation Environment in the Cartridge view (use the corresponding wizards for both tasks). b. On the Connection Details tab of the Activation Environment editor, specify how to connect to the activation environment. c. On the Connection Details tab of the Activation Environment editor, add cartridges for deployment, deploy them to the environment, undeploy them from the environment, and remove them from the list of cartridges that were added for deployment. d. Use the NEP Map editor to deploy and manage Network Elements. Related Topics Getting Started with Studio for ASAP Configuring Activation Service Cartridges Studio supports three types of Activation cartridges: ■ ■ ■ Activation Network cartridges. See Understanding Activation Network Cartridges for more information. Activation Service cartridges. See Understanding Activation Service Cartridges for more information. Activation SRT cartridges. See Understanding Activation SRT Cartridges. for more information. Beta Draft Getting Started with Studio for ASAP 1-5

Configuring Activation Service Cartridges The procedure below, with links to detailed topics, outlines the basic steps you need to follow to configure an Activation Service cartridge. To configure a service model cartridge 1. Load the cartridges. Import Activation Network cartridges (from a cartridge project, from a SAR file, or from an environment) containing components you can use for your Service cartridge. See Importing Cartridges from Cartridge Projects, Importing Cartridges from SAR Files, and Importing Cartridges from Environments for more information. 2. Create an Activation Cartridge project and set up the Activation Service cartridge. See Setting Up Activation Cartridges for more information. a. b. 3. Create an Activation Service Cartridge project and display it in the Cartridge view of the Design Perspective. Configure the cartridge details in the Activation Service Cartridge editor. Design the service model. a. Determine what type of service model you need. Options are: The vendor, technology and software load-specific service model. See Understanding Vendor, Technology, and Software Load-Specific Service Models for more information. The common service model. See Understanding Common Service Models for more information. The mixed service model. See Understanding Mixed Service Models for more information. b. Create elements for the service model. Service actions can be created with a wizard or with the Cartridge Generation feature. You can create the necessary atomic actions with a wizard (this is called a common service model) or use atomic actions from imported Activation Network cartridges (this is called a mixed service model). See Creating Model Elements and Generating Framework Models for more information. c. Define the relationship between model elements by linking them manually and defining their parameters. See Understanding Model Element Relationships for more information. 4. Extend the user-defined exit types. See Configuring User Defined Exit Types for more information. 5. Create custom action processors. See Understanding Custom Action Processors for more information. 6. Configure network elements. a. Define a network element. A NE represents one specific piece of equipment (a single instance) in the network. A connection pool contains one or more connections that can be use to connect to the network element (possibly simultaneously). Each network element has a single connection pool associated with it. See Understanding Network Elements for more information. 1-6 Modeling Activation Beta Draft

Configuring Activation Service Cartridges b. Define a dynamic NE template. If you do not intend to configure static network element instances for a specific customer solution, you can configure dynamic NE templates to allow network element attributes to be dynamically sent to A5 on work orders. Dynamic NE templates are used when upstream systems (such as Inventory) contain the necessary information to connect to the network element instance. Passing this information to A5 dynamically avoids having to configure it in multiple locations (for example, in A5 as well as in an inventory system). See Creating NE Templates for more information. 7. Package the cartridge. See Packaging Activation Cartridge Implementations for more information. a. Model the package. Use the Cartridge editor to specify which elements will be included in the cartridge (SAR file). If the service model you have created depends upon elements in an Activation Network cartridge it is also necessary to specify which elements of the Activation Network cartridge should be deployed. Only deploy those elements that are required in the dependent Activation Network cartridges. For example, if you are not reusing the service actions and network actions in an Activation Network cartridge, then deselect those elements. b. c. Include JARs in the SAR. d. 8. Create the JAR with ANT. Put external JARs in the NEP classpath on the ASAP server. Deploy the cartridge. See Deploying Cartridges and Managing the ASAP Environment for more information. a. Create an Activation Environment project and an Activation environment in the Cartridge view (use the corresponding wizards for both tasks). b. On the Connection Details tab of the Activation Environment editor, specify how to connect to the ASAP environment. c. On the Connection Details tab of the Activation Environment editor, add cartridges for deployment, deploy them to the environment, undeploy them from the environment, and remove them from the list of cartridges that were added for deployment. d. Use the NEP Map editor to deploy and manage network elements. Related Topics Getting Started with Studio for ASAP Beta Draft Getting Started with Studio for ASAP 1-7

Configuring Activation Service Cartridges 1-8 Modeling Activation Beta Draft

2 Creating Activation Cartridge Projects 2 Three types of Activation cartridges are supported in Studio: ■ ■ ■ Activation Network Cartridge projects, required for creation of an Activation Network cartridge. Activation Service Cartridge projects, required for creation of an Activation Service cartridge. Activation SRT Cartridge projects, required for creation of an Activation SRT cartridge. Additionally, an Activation Environment project is required for deployment of all Activation cartridges. Related Topics Understanding Source Control Understanding Activation Network Cartridges Understanding Activation Service Cartridges Setting Up Activation Cartridges Understanding Cartridge Export Importing Cartridges Removing Cartridge Projects Renaming Cartridge Projects Understanding Activation SRT Cartridges Understanding Source Control Adding projects and other resources to source control enables you to track changes and share work among team members. Cartridge developers can use source control when building cartridges. Service modelers, once they have created the basic framework for a customer-specific service model and are confident that no significant changes need to be made, can place all elements in the cartridge under source control. Studio supports both ClearCase and CVS for use as source control. Refer to the Eclipse online Help for more information about source control. Note: Beta Draft Creating Activation Cartridge Projects 2-1

Understanding Activation Network Cartridges Related Topics Creating Activation Cartridge Projects Understanding Activation Network Cartridges Cartridge developers can create new Activation Network cartridges in Studio to support a single type of network equipment (for example, for a DMS-100 switch), or import existing cartridges into Studio and modify them. You configure Activation Network cartridges for a single vendor, technology, and software load. Typically, a cartridge developer will deliver Activation Network cartridges to service modelers and solution teams, who use the Activation Network cartridge components to create customer-specific service models. Related Topics Creating Activation Cartridge Projects Understanding Activation Service Cartridges Service modelers develop Activation Service cartridges to create a service model that can activate services on different types of network equipment, as the service actions and network actions within the Activation Service cartridge may be missing one or more of the vendor, technology and software load tokens. Modelers can use elements of Activation Network cartridges in Activation Service cartridges for implementation when creating common service models. Service modelers purchase and then import Activation Network cartridges, to build one or more Activation Service cartridges that link down into components within network cartridges and that are specific to an offered service. Service cartridges incorporate the many different types of equipment used to set up and provide telephony services. You can use Activation Service cartridges to create customer-specific service models. These cartridges can contain customer-specific service modeling elements as well as links to elements in other cartridges. While an Activation Network cartridge always has the three associated attributes (a vendor, such as Ericsson; a technology, such as DMS; and a software load, which references the release number), an Activation Service cartridge does not necessarily contain all these attributes. Activation Service cartridges have elements that generally span multiple types of vendor equipment, can run multiple software loads, and may or may not include one or more of the Activation Network cartridge attributes. When creating an Activation Service cartridge, there are two required attributes that you must specify: a service attribute (for example, Prepaid) and a Domain attribute (for example, Mobile). Related Topics Creating Activation Cartridge Projects Setting Up Activation Cartridges You use the New Studio Activation Cartridge Project wizard to set up Activation Network and Activation Service cartridge projects and to specify cartridge attributes (vendor, technology, and software load). After you create the cartridge project, you can add additional details using the Cartridge editor. To create Activation Cartridge projects 2-2 Modeling Activation Beta Draft

Understanding Cartridge Export 1. From the main menu, select Studio, Show Design Perspective. 2. In the Design perspective, right-click in the Cartridge view and select New, Activation Cartridge Project. Alternately, from the main menu select Studio, New, Activation Cartridge Project. The New Studio Activation Cartridge Project wizard appears, displaying the Activation Cartridge Info dialog. 3. Enter a name for the project. 4. Accept the default location or browse for another location. 5. In Studio Settings, select Activation Network Cartridge or Activation Service Cartridge, as appropriate. 6. Select the appropriate ASAP version, and enter the package name. 7. Click Next. The Cartridge Details dialog appears. 8. For Activation Network Cartridge projects, specify the vendor, technology and software load attributes for the cartridge. When specifying vendors, for example, you might use its stock symbol, such as ERIC (for Ericsson). Examples of technology include HLR (home location register) and DMS (digital multiplex system). You might represent software loads with he release number and dash combination, such as R11-0. 9. For Activation Service Cartridge projects, specify the service and domain attributes for the cartridge. Examples of services: Service: Prepaid Domain: Mobile Service: Postpaid Domain: Mobile Service: Residential Domain: POTS Service: VPN Domain: IP 10. Click Finish to complete the cartridge project. Or, click Next to change the Java configuration in the Java Settings dialog. For example, you can add libraries in the Libraries tab (you can decide to change the configuration later). If you modified the Java settings, click Finish to save changes and complete the Cartridge project. A new Activation Network Cartridge or Activation Service Cartridge project appears in the Cartridge view. The project contains an entity that represents the network cartridge and also has a Documentation group (which provides access to the Cartridge Guide generation feature for documenting the completed cartridge). See Documenting Cartridges for more information. Related Topics Creating Activation Cartridge Projects Understanding Cartridge Export To export cartridges from a workspace, zip up the cartridge projects (into zip or TAR files) and export the files to an archive file. Users can then import the cartridges from these cartridge projects to their workspace. Importing from a cartridge project is a more powerful way of importing data into studio because it is possible to obtain an entire workspace, including one or more environments as well as one or more SAR Beta Draft Creating Activation Cartridge Projects 2-3

Importing Cartridges files. This approach is useful when working with projects that contain complex configurations with multiple dependencies between cartridges (for example, one or more Activation Service Cartridges that depend on one or more Activation Network Cartridges). In a team, a workspace should only get set up once (at the beginning of the project) by one person, and then everybody shares this workspace. Note: When importing a project, Studio recreates the workspace as it was originally created, including any custom artifacts. Alternately, you can manually recreate the configuration by individually importing each of the SAR files corresponding to the original cartridges. However, there is a potential for data loss as not all artifacts (custom ones you have created) will have been captured within the SAR file when it was originally created. Currently, the way Activation Network Cartridges are obtained from Oracle is by retrieving individual SAR files from the portal and loading them into Studio. This approach is sufficient as there are no dependencies between such cartridges (each cartridge is self-contained). Note: Related Topics Exporting Cartridges Creating Activation Cartridge Projects Exporting Cartridges To export cartridges from the Studio workspace 1. From the main menu, select File, Export to open the Export-Select dialog. 2. Select General, Archive File. 3. Click Next. The Export-Archive File dialog opens. 4. In the Export-Archive File dialog, select the projects and items you want to export. Select your options, and click Browse to specify the location of the new archive file that will contain your zipped projects. 5. Click Finish to start the export. The zipped archive file appears in the specified location. Related Topics Understanding Cartridge Export Creating Activation Cartridge Projects Importing Cartridges The import functions are used to import data from an external source into your Studio workspace. For example, if you have purchased cartridges from Oracle, you can 2-4 Modeling Activation Beta Draft

Importing Cartridges import them into Studio and reuse their components when you build Activation Service cartridges. Additionally, if an Activation Service cartridge has already been created by a co-worker, you can obtain the configuration by importing it into your Studio workspace. Lastly, you can load data directly from an ASAP environment. This approach is useful when you want to obtain a complete snapshot of all the data in an ASAP environment. You can use the following methods to import data into your Studio workspace: ■ ■ ■ Import from a cartridge project. See Importing Cartridges from Cartridge Projects for more information. Import from a SAR file. See Importing Cartridges from SAR Files for more information. Import from an ASAP environment. See Importing Cartridges from Environments for more information. You import Activation Network cartridges (from a location outside of your workspace) to set up your workspace. Cartridges can be imported in a zipped (zip or TAR files) or unzipped format. Service modelers can import several network cartridges into the workspace to utilize their components (such as atomic actions, action processors, and NE templates) when setting up Activation Service cartridges. Service modelers can also import a suitable service cartridge as a starting point and modify it as needed. Cartridge developers can import one or more network cartridges into their workspace (instead of building them from scratch) to use as starting point for creating new cartridges (for example, to make minor changes to cartridges for the next release) or to compare with other cartridges. See Setting Up Activation Cartridges for more information about creating new cartridges. To import cartridges into your workspace, you can zip up cartridge projects in ZIP or TAR format and export them to an archive file. This method produces a snapshot of the entire workspace as originally created (including one or multiple environments and SAR file) and includes any custom artifacts. Note: This method is useful when you have a project that contains a complex configuration with multiple dependencies between cartridges (for example, one or more Activation Service cartridges that depend on one or more Activation Network cartridges). While it is possible to manually recreate the configuration by importing each of the SAR files from the original cartridges, some data loss may occur if you have custom artifacts that were not included in the original SAR file. To obtain Activation Network cartridges from Oracle, you can retrieve individual SAR files from the portal and import them into Studio. Each cartridge is self-contained (no dependencies exists). Note: Related Topics Understanding Sealed Cartridges Understanding Cartridge Read-Only Status Beta Draft Creating Activation Cartridge Projects 2-5

Importing Cartridges Importing Cartridges from Cartridge Projects Importing Cartridges from SAR Files Importing Cartridges from Environments Activation Cartridge Editor Creating Activation Cartridge Projects Understanding Sealed Cartridges After importing a cartridge, the cartridge is marked as Sealed in your Studio view. The cartridge is sealed to preserve its integrity during the import. To rebuild the imported cartridge (and obtain a new SAR file before deploying), you must unseal the cartridge. On the Cartridge Details tab of the Cartridge editor, click Unseal and confirm that you want to unseal the cartridge by clicking Yes when prompted. Related Topics Importing Cartridges Creating Activation Cartridge Projects Understanding Cartridge Read-Only Status Studio imports all files as read-only, and enables you to make change to cartridges shipped as product in a separate Activation Network or Activation Service cartridge, providing you with a clean separation between your shipped and custom cartridges. Maintaining this separation enables you save time when downloading eFixes and upgrades for the core cartridge. You can change the file properties of shipped cartridges to read-write, but this is not recommended. Additionally, it is recommended that you maintain a separation between shipped and customized cartridges if you intend to customize cartridge source code. Note: Customizing Cartridges To customize a cartridge, create a second cartridge in Studio with the same vendor/technology/software load (or, create a service cartridge if you do not want to specify these settings) and place all the customizations in this second cartridge. The new cartridge extends the productized version, and can reference entities in the productized cartridge and there are facilities built into Studio that enable your atomic actions to obtain parameters from the productized cartridge. Additionally, you can copy and paste the service actions and atomic actions into the extension cartridge. When and upgrade or eFix to the cartridge is available, you can replace the cartridge project if the new version of the core cartridge affects your extensions (for example, if there are new required parameters or if names have changed on parameters). In addition, on the server you can redeploy just the eFixed cartridge without changing your extensions. 2-6 Modeling Activation Beta Draft

Importing Cartridges Changing the Read-Only Status on Cartridges If you intend to define the files in your productized cartridge as read-write on Windows XP), navigate to the root folder of the project and set the read-only attribute to false recursively. This sets all the read-only attributes to false. If you are not using Windows XP, you can use the attrib command from a command prompt. Refresh the project (select it and use the F5 key, or use the File menu command) and then make your changes. Note: This method is not recommended and is not advisable if you are using source control for your project. Related Topics Importing Cartridges Creating Activation Cartridge Projects Importing Cartridges from Cartridge Projects To import cartridges into your workspace, you can zip up cartridge projects in ZIP or TAR format and export them to an archive file. This method produces a snapshot of the entire workspace as originally created (including one or multiple environments and SAR file) and includes any custom artifacts. You can import cartridges from a cartridge project into studio to obtain an entire workspace, including one or multiple environments and SAR files. This method is useful when you have a project that contains a complex configuration with multiple dependencies between cartridges (for example, one or more Activation Service cartridges that depend on one or more Activation Network cartridges). To import a cartridge from a cartridge project 1. From the main menu bar, select File, Import to open the Import-Select dialog. 2. Select General, Existing Project into Workspace and click Next to open the Import Projects dialog. 3. Depending on where the project is located, select Select root directory or Select archive file. 4. Click Browse to locate the directory or file containing the projects. 5. Select the projects to import. 6. Click Finish to start the import. The projects all appear in your workspace. Before working with an imported cartridge, refer to the About Cartridge Import topic for more information about read-only statuses and working with sealed and unsealed cartridges. Note: Related Topics Importing Cartridges Creating Activation Cartridge Projects Beta Draft Creating Activation Cartridge Projects 2-7

Importing Cartridges Importing Cartridges from SAR Files A SAR file is one method for storing an ASAP configuration within a single artifact. Import cartridges from SAR files when you want to load into Studio cartridges that have been packaged in a SAR file. For example, when new Oracle Activation Network cartridges are available, they are packaged into a SAR file and posted to the portal in a zipped format (TAR file) for download. You can download the TAR file, then extract the SAR file from the TAR file. Additionally, when you create a new Activation Service cartridge, Studio automatically generates a SAR file. When you have finished creating the service model, you can email the SAR file to another Studio user for import or check it into a source control system. To import a cartridge from a SAR file 1. Right-click in the Studio view of the Design perspective and click Import Activation Archive. Alternately, from the main menu select File, Import to display the Import-Select dialog, then select Studio Wizards, Activation Archive (SAR) and click Next. The Activation Archive Import wizard appears in both cases. 2. In the Activation Archive Import wizard, click Browse to search for a suitable SAR file that contains the network cartridge you need to create your service cartridge. After you select a SAR file, the fields in the wizard populate automatically for your cartridge. Cartridges that were created in Studio populate the Cartridge Type field automatically with the correct type (this is a non-editable field). For cartridges not created in Studio, you must select the type of cartridge you are importing. Note: 3. Click Finish to start the import. A new Activation Service Cartridge project appears in the Studio view. Before working with an imported cartridge, refer to the About Cartridge Import topic for more information about read-only statuses and working with sealed and unsealed cartridges. Note: Related Topics Importing Cartridges Creating Activation Cartridge Projects Importing Cartridges from Environments If you have an existing ASAP implementation, you can point Studio at an ASAP environment and import the configuration (service model, JAR files, and network elements) contained in that environment. This feature eliminates the need to manually run scripts that extract data from an environment into a SAR file and import that SAR file into Studio. You can use this feature to obtain a snapshot of an environment configured from multiple sources, such as insert scripts, XML, or multiple Studio instances. In this 2-8 Modeling Activation Beta Draft

Importing Cartridges scenario, it is possible to load the service model and network element configuration into Studio directly from an ASAP environment. Additionally, importing from an existing ASAP environment is useful when you have just begun using Studio as a service modeling tool and you have an existing ASAP implementation. To import a cartridge from an environment 1. From main menu, select File, Import. The Import dialog box appears. 2. Expand the Studio Wizards directory. 3. From Environment, select Activation Project. 4. Click Next. The Activation Environment Import wizard appears. 5. Select an environment connection method. Select Get connection info from Activation Environment Editor and select an Activation environment from the corresponding list if you want to obtain the necessary connection information from an existing environment object. Select Specify connection information below if you have not yet created an appropriate Activation Environment editor, or if you are importing from an ASAP 5.2.4 environment (Activation Environment editor supports up to ASAP 5.2.3). When you select this option, you must also populate the corresponding fields with connection information. See Creating Activation Environment Projects for information about creating and configuring ASAP connection details. 6. Click Next after you have specified all of the connection information. Enter the user name and password in the login dialog to connect to the ASAP JMX service. If the system is able to successfully connect, the system prompts you to enter the project name. 7. Click Finish to import the environment project. Related Topics Importing Cartridges Creating Activation Cartridge Projects Activation Cartridge Editor After creating Activation Cartridge project, you can configure the cartridge specifications and parameters in the tabs of the Cartridge editor (click the Activation Cartridge entity icon in the Cartridge view to display the Cartridge editor). Table 2–1 Activation Editor Tab Overview Editor Tab Description Blueprint Read-only. Displays the generated documentation of the project, including cartridge properties, service actions, atomic actions, action processors, connection handlers, and network element configuration (for network cartridges) or service configuration (for service cartridges). Cartridge Details Displays cartridge properties (the build number increases automatically every time you save) and network element details. Beta Draft Creating Activation Cartridge Projects 2-9

Importing Cartridges Table 2–1 (Cont.) Activation Editor Tab Overview Editor Tab Description Cartridge Layout For network cartridge, this tab enables you to generate a framework model, which creates the service action, atomic action and action processor for any combination of action and entity and creates the appropriate association for the three elements in a 1:1:1 relationship. See Generating Framework Models for more information about framework models. For service cartridges, this tab enables you to generate service actions. You can create a service model that is appropriate for a specific customer. Packaging Enables you to specify which elements to include in the cartridge SAR file. See Packaging Activation Cartridge Implementations for more information about packaging. For service cartridges, usually all elements are deployed. Locations Displays where items get stored. In the Target Platform section, you can change the ASAP version by selecting predefined ASAP versions or by entering new version numbers. Testing Enables you to view ASAP test cases that you created for your projects and enables you to run them individually or simultaneously. If you change the ASAP version in the Locations tab to a version different than the version you selected during cartridge project creation, you must also update all dependent JAR files, such as asapcommonlib.jar, JInterp.jar, Studio_2_6_0.jar, and any other related JAR files. These files are required when the cartridge depends on third-party libraries. Additionally, you must delete any generated code. Lastly, you must perform a clean and full build to regenerate the code. Note: Studio uses the default implementation package name as a prefix for generated code. It is recommended that you accept defaults and follow recommended naming conventions for all entities that you create. Note: Network elements and environments for ASAP are not defined inside Activation Cartridge projects. Only those items that are bundled for deliver included in the cartridge project. Note: Activation cartridge projects are also Java projects (builds on functionality of Java project). Java development can be done inside Activation Cartridge projects; you do not need a separate Java project for development. Eclipse online documentation for Java projects and its configurations, properties, and settings also applies to the Java configuration of an Activation Cartridge project. Refer to the Eclipse online documentation when setting up a cartridge. Note: 2-10 Modeling Activation Beta Draft

Renaming Cartridge Projects Related Topics Importing Cartridges Creating Activation Cartridge Projects Removing Cartridge Projects You can remove a cartridges from Studio when you no longer need it them. To remove a cartridge project 1. Select the project (representing the cartridge) from the Cartridge view of the Studio Design perspective or from the Package Explorer view of the Java perspective. 2. From the main menu, select Edit, Delete. Alternately, you can right-click on the project and select Delete. The Confirm Project Delete dialog appears and prompts you to confirm the project deletion. 3. Select the method of deletion. ■ ■ 4. Select Do not delete contents to remove the cartridge from your workspace without deleting the content from the file system. Select Also delete contents under pathname to erase the cartridge from the file system completely (in which case it will no longer appear in your workspace). Click Yes to delete the project from your workspace. Or, click No if you do not want to delete the project at this time. Related Topics Creating Activation Cartridge Projects Renaming Cartridge Projects You can rename a cartridge project to create a new version. To rename a project 1. From the main menu, select Window, Open Perspective, Java. 2. In the Package Explorer view, right-click a project to access the context menu. 3. Select Refactor, Rename. Follow the instructions to rename the project. 4. From the main menu, select Studio, Show Design Perspective. 5. In the Cartridge view, right-click the project's cartridge icon and select Rename. Change the cartridge name to the same name you gave the project in the other view. 6. Restart Studio to refresh all cached information Related Topics Creating Activation Cartridge Projects Beta Draft Creating Activation Cartridge Projects 2-11

Renaming Cartridge Projects 2-12 Modeling Activation Beta Draft

3 Modeling ASAP Services 3 When configuring Activation cartridges, you must first create model elements. Elements used in modeling services are: ■ Atomic actions. ■ Service actions. ■ Action processors. Additionally, you must define relationship parameters for the atomic actions, service actions, and action processors, and then associate these three elements. The Cartridge Generation feature expedites and simplifies these steps by automatically generating a framework model. The steps you take to model services for an Activation cartridge depend on the type of cartridge (Activation Network or Activation Service cartridge) and, when modeling Activation Service cartridges, the type of model (mixed or common). After you model a service, complete the parameter descriptions for entities by opening each editor and providing data (for example, open the Cartridge editor to configure the cartridge and its elements). Also, complete any documentation information that needs to be included in the cartridge auto-generated documentation. Related Topics Modeling Services for Activation Network Cartridge Modeling Services for Activation Service Cartridges using a Common Service Model Modeling Services for Activation Service Cartridges using a Mixed Service Model Understanding Vendor, Technology, and Software Load-Specific Service Models Understanding Common Service Models Understanding Mixed Service Models Creating Model Elements Understanding Model Element Relationships Configuring Element Properties Generating Framework Models Documenting Models Beta Draft Modeling ASAP Services 3-1

Modeling Services for Activation Network Cartridge Modeling Services for Activation Network Cartridge The following steps describe how to model services for an Activation Network cartridge. To model services within an Activation Network cartridge 1. Create service actions (with the vendor, technology, and software load tokens). 2. Create atomic actions (with the vendor, technology, and software load tokens). 3. Create action processors. 4. Create Java methods. 5. Associate elements (service actions, atomic actions, action processors, Java methods in a 1:1:1 relationship). While creating and associating these elements can be done manually, it is more common to use the Cartridge Generation feature for Activation Network cartridges. See Generating Framework Models for more information. Note: Related Topics Modeling ASAP Services Modeling Services for Activation Service Cartridges using a Common Service Model The following steps describe how to model services for Activation Service cartridges that use a common service model. To model services for Activation Service cartridges that use a common service model 1. Create service actions (common). 2. Create common atomic actions. 3. Associate service actions, atomic actions and action processors from Activation Network cartridges in a 1:many:many relationship (action processors are already linked to Java methods). Related Topics Modeling ASAP Services Modeling Services for Activation Service Cartridges using a Mixed Service Model The following steps describe how to model services for Activation Service cartridges that use a mixed service model. To Model Services for Activation Service Cartridges that Use a Mixed Service Model 1. Create service actions (common). 2. Associate service actions to atomic actions from Activation Network cartridges in a 1:many:1 relationship (atomic actions from Activation Network cartridges are already linked to action processors and Java methods). 3-2 Modeling Activation Beta Draft

Understanding Vendor, Technology, and Software Load-Specific Service Models Note: Using the Cartridge Generation feature, you can generate only service actions, you must select which atomic actions (one or possibly more) will be associated with the service actions in the cartridge. You may need to create (for all types of Activation Service cartridges), customized action processors and Java methods to implement solution- specific behavior. See Creating Custom Action Processors for more information. Note: Related Topics Modeling ASAP Services Understanding Vendor, Technology, and Software Load-Specific Service Models Vendor, technology, and software load-specific service models are provided out-of-the-box with delivered cartridges. Entities within the service model contain the vendor, technology, and software load tokens and there is generally a one-to-one relationship (or limited one-to-many relationship) between service actions and atomic actions as shown in the following diagram: Example 3–1 Service Model Relationship Example C_NT-HLRPS_MSP8_ADD_CFB --> A_NT-HLRPS_MSP8_ADD_CFB C_NT-HLRPS_MSP8_ADD_3WC --> A_NT-HLRPS_MSP8_ADD_3WC C_NT-HLRPS_MSP8_ADD_SUB --> A_NT-HLRPS_MSP8_ADD_SUB C_CSCO-CCM_4-1-X_GET_VOIP-INFO --> A_CSCO-CCM_4-1-X_GET_LINE --> A_CSCO-CCM_4-1-X_GET_PHONE --> A_CSCO-CCM_4-1-X_GET_USER Figure 3–1 Service Model Relationship Example Service models designed in this way enable upstream systems to directly access device-specific operations. Using out-of-the-box service model design preserves simplicity in the ASAP service model and requires less service modeling work within ASAP in the short term. However, it also forces upstream systems, which will be Beta Draft Modeling ASAP Services 3-3

Understanding Common Service Models required to make selections of service actions based on the vendor, technology, and software loads being activated, to collate service actions together into meaningful work orders. Additionally, vendor equipment changes may create future maintenance. When utilizing an out-of-the-box cartridge service model, consider consolidating service actions into meaningful building blocks to avoid pushing additional logic to upstream systems. Note: Consider the use of cartridge (vendor, technology, and software load-specific) service models when: ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Services are implemented very differently across vendors (for example, use of preconfigured profiles vs. passing of raw parameters to a network element) or next generation services whose standards are evolving (multiple vendors at different phases of support for new technologies, for example, and who have different interface specifications). One single type of vendor equipment is present in the network (for example, a specific vendor for HLRs, a specific vendor for voice mail) without future plans to introduce additional vendors into the network. Atomic actions are technology oriented (for example, nail up a relay point) rather than service oriented (for example, add a subscriber). Significant knowledge of the network infrastructure exists in upstream systems, such as Inventory. Highly complex domains (IP-VPN, ATM) with homogeneous networks (for example, Cisco) are used. Different activation steps (API calls) are required in order to activate the same services across different vendor equipment. Lastly, if you have customer-specific parameter values that you want to expose to upstream systems, you can create new atomic actions with customer-specified atomic action parameters defined as defaults. This approach exposes only a subset of the cartridge atomic actions via the service actions. However, to use this variant you must create duplicate service actions and atomic actions with minor differences, which may create maintenance challenges. Related Topics Modeling ASAP Services Understanding Common Service Models Common service actions are most often associated with common atomic actions to create a consistently abstract service model (both service actions and atomic actions are common). In common service models one or more of the vendor, technology, and software load attributes are left out of the names of both service actions and atomic actions to indicate that they may be used to activate services on equipment from multiple vendors. ASAP has a built-in mechanism to map common atomic actions to a specific vendor, technology, and software load implementation based on the vendor, technology, and software load of the network element on which the service is being activated (see tbl_nep_atomic action_prog for mapping details). The following example shows a common service that adds a subscriber regardless of whether it is a Nortel DMS 100 (POTS) or a Nortel CS2K (VoIP): 3-4 Modeling Activation Beta Draft

Understanding Common Service Models C_ADD_SUB --> A_ADD_SUB Figure 3–2 Common Service for A

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