MindWing's ASHA 2010 Presentation on Autism

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Information about MindWing's ASHA 2010 Presentation on Autism
Education

Published on November 23, 2010

Author: mindwingconcepts

Source: slideshare.net

ASHA 2010 Exhibitor Technology Presentation It’s All About the Story: The Language-Thinking-Social Connection for Children with Autism & Related Developmental Disorders and Social Learning Challenges Presenter: Maryellen Rooney Moreau, M.Ed., CCC-SLP President and Founder of MindWing Concepts, Inc.

Copyright © 2010, MindWing Concepts, Inc. • 1-888-228-9746 • Web: www.mindwingconcepts.com NEW! The Autism Collection FREE SHIPPING & HANDLING!!! Discount Code on all Products: ASHA10 Valid Through December 31, 2010 VISIT OUR EXHIBIT BOOTH # 215 to Read the “Foreward” by Michelle Garcia Winner

Copyright © 2010, MindWing Concepts, Inc. • 1-888-228-9746 • Web: www.mindwingconcepts.com “The Story Grammar Marker® puts the “big picture” in the child’s pocket.” - Kathleen Becker, CCC-SLP Central Coherence “Children with ASD often: Do not recognize the whole, they see parts, therefore they do not get the full context of books/experiences…they do not have the ability to derive overall meaning from a mass of details. They see each individual tree and do not “see the forest.” They do not get the big picture but are great at the parts. Details are a favored topic of children with ASD.”

Story-based Intervention was cited as one of eleven established treatments for Autism: the only non-behavioral intervention cited. “STORY-BASED INTERVENTION PACKAGE:” Story-based interventions include treatments that involve a written description of the situations under which specific behaviors are expected to occur. Stories may be supplemented with additional components (e.g., prompting, reinforcement, discussion, etc.). Social Stories™ (Carol Gray) are the most well known story-basedinterventions and they seek to answer the “who, what, when, where, and why” questions in order to improve perspective taking”. Story-based interventions arose from the Theory of Mind PerspectiveStandards Project: www.nationalautismcenter.org“Evidence-Based Practice and Autism in the Schools” Copyright © 2010, MindWing Concepts, Inc. • 1-888-228-9746 • Web: www.mindwingconcepts.com

Story-based interventions include treatments that involve a written description of the situations under which specific behaviors are expected to occur.

Stories may be supplemented with additional components (e.g., prompting, reinforcement, discussion, etc.).

Social Stories™ (Carol Gray) are the most well known story-basedinterventions and they seek to answer the “who, what, when, where, and why” questions in order to improve perspective taking”.

Story-based interventions arose from the Theory of Mind Perspective

Narrative Intervention using MindWing’s toolswill help your students with… Perspective Taking Theory of Mind Critical Thinking “Planfull”ness Feelings & Motivations Pragmatics Problem Solving & Conflict Resolution Building Central CoherenceCopyright © 2010, MindWing Concepts, Inc. • 1-888-228-9746 • Web: www.mindwingconcepts.com

Perspective Taking

Theory of Mind

Critical Thinking

“Planfull”ness

Feelings & Motivations

Pragmatics

Problem Solving & Conflict Resolution

Building Central Coherence

Copyright © 2010, MindWing Concepts, Inc. • 1-888-228-9746 • Web: www.mindwingconcepts.com Why is the development of the “Narrative” so important for children with Social Learning Challenges? Because, the NARRATIVE is the HUMAN mode of thought – our actions, our emotions and the consequences. -Jerome Bruner Narrative intervention, however, is a means to provide instruction and intervention on the blend of linguistic, cognitive and social knowledge. Wetherby, A. & Prizant, B. (2004). Autism Spectrum Disorders: A transactional developmental perspective. Baltimore: Brookes Publishing

Copyright © 2010, MindWing Concepts, Inc. • 1-888-228-9746 • Web: www.mindwingconcepts.com

Copyright © 2010, MindWing Concepts, Inc. • 1-888-228-9746 • Web: www.mindwingconcepts.com Excerpts From Autism Collection Booth #1

Copyright © 2010, MindWing Concepts, Inc. • 1-888-228-9746 • Web: www.mindwingconcepts.com Example of the need for Narrative Intervention (and its impact on writing and communication)…. Page 4.2 in It’s All About the Story This 5th grade student is diagnosed with Asperger’s Syndrome. This is his personal narrative in response to a writing prompt. PROMPT: Everyone has a day or an experience that they remember because they were special. Maybe you had a wonderful birthday party or a special person came to your home for a visit. Write about a day or experience that was special to you. Remember to write an exciting beginning and include details in your writing. My radio came on! “Better get up!”my mother shouted from downstairs. “They called and said they would be coming 15 minutes early.” I jumped up, pulled on my sweats and bolted down the stairs. I had 45 minutes left and I had a lot to do. They came in their big SUV. We had a really good time. We drove home in the rain and I was really tired after all that walking. I kept thinking of that thing. I will tell him about it at school. Even though I was mad, I had a great time.

Copyright © 2010, MindWing Concepts, Inc. • 1-888-228-9746 • Web: www.mindwingconcepts.com

Copyright © 2010, MindWing Concepts, Inc. • 1-888-228-9746 • Web: www.mindwingconcepts.com Using the Personal Narrative in Conjunction with Social Stories™ Kathleen Becker’s Example in It’s All About the Story Page 14.1

PERSONAL NARRATIVES: Also called AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL EVENT NARRATIVES are the beginnings of narrative discourse. “The Personal Narrative” is often a second grade English Language Arts State Standard. Personal narratives expand children’s conversational abilities since they are the basis for exchange of information between and among children.Copyright © 2010, MindWing Concepts, Inc. • 1-888-228-9746 • Web: www.mindwingconcepts.com

“The Personal Narrative” is often a second grade English Language Arts State Standard.

Personal narratives expand children’s conversational abilities since they are the basis for exchange of information between and among children.

Copyright © 2010, MindWing Concepts, Inc. • 1-888-228-9746 • Web: www.mindwingconcepts.com Character: Children in class including Jake Setting: an art project is taking place in the classroom Initiating Event: Children hear an announcement that there will be a presentation on geography in the auditorium soon Feeling: excited Plan: to get to the auditorium (by following the usual procedure) Planned Attempt: put art supplies away Planned Attempt: sit at own desks within the classroom Planned Attempt: wait to be told to make a line Planned Attempt: get in line and go down hall quietly Consequence: Get to auditorium to hear presentation Resolution: anticipation, excitement for the presentation

Copyright © 2010, MindWing Concepts, Inc. • 1-888-228-9746 • Web: www.mindwingconcepts.com Character: Jake Setting: participating in an art project withother peers Initiating Event: Jake hears an announcement that there will be a presentation on geography in the auditorium soon Reaction:  Jake bolts to the door to get in line (not following the usual procedure)

Copyright © 2010, MindWing Concepts, Inc. • 1-888-228-9746 • Web: www.mindwingconcepts.com Character: Kathleen Setting: in the school providing speech/language services to children Initiating Event: receives a call from the art teacher that Jake has had a “melt down” He had not followed directions to put all art supplies away before lining up to go to a presentation on Africa being held in the auditorium. When asked to return to his seat and put the art supplies away, he threw the markers on the floor and began yelling how he had to get to the auditorium. Jake was sitting on the floor crying when Kathleen entered…

Copyright © 2010, MindWing Concepts, Inc. • 1-888-228-9746 • Web: www.mindwingconcepts.com Character: Jake is an eight-year-old boy who loves geography. Setting: Jake is at school participating in art class. Initiating Event: (a mental state) He knows that there is going to be a presentation on Africa in the auditorium. Feeling: Jake feels happy but also anxious…change in his day. Plan: He wanted to get to the presentation because of his love for geography. Planned Attempt: Jump up as soon as the teacher says it is time to go (without following the art teacher’s directions)… Planned Attempt: ___________________

Copyright © 2010, MindWing Concepts, Inc. • 1-888-228-9746 • Web: www.mindwingconcepts.com Excerpts From Autism Collection Booth #2

Copyright © 2010, MindWing Concepts, Inc. • 1-888-228-9746 • Web: www.mindwingconcepts.com Perspective Taking with the Critical Thinking Triangle™ Perspective taking is the ability to see a point of view other than one’s own. “We must be able to stand in the shoes of other, see the world through their eyes, empathize with what they are feeling, and attempt to think and react to the world in the same way that they think and react to the world.” - Moskowitz, Lehigh University, Social Cognition 2005

Copyright © 2010, MindWing Concepts, Inc. • 1-888-228-9746 • Web: www.mindwingconcepts.com

Copyright © 2010, MindWing Concepts, Inc. • 1-888-228-9746 • Web: www.mindwingconcepts.com

Copyright © 2010, MindWing Concepts, Inc. • 1-888-228-9746 • Web: www.mindwingconcepts.com

Mental State connected to the kick-off and feeling: The three Billy Goats Gruff knew that on the hill, beyond the river, grew sweet green grass. But under the bridge lived a great ugly troll with eyes as big as saucers and a nose as long as a poker. And the troll was hungry too. PLAN: Notice the entire page devoted to the plan: What to do? (Create a mental image here through attention to dialogue, gesture and facial expression!) They wonder What to do! They want the grass.. They know that the troll would like to eat them. They do not want the troll to eat them. They know that the troll would prefer to ea t a big goat. They realize that the biggest goat is the strongest goat of the three of them. They think that the strongest goat has the best chance to overcome the troll. They remember that trolls are sly and feisty. In order to get to the meadow, the goats have to work as a group and trick the troll. They must use what they think, know, remember and realize things, to trick the troll. They must take the troll’s perspective about his thinking about them?They show that they have taken the perspective of the troll:They decide to go over the bridge in order of size, hoping that the greedy troll with want the biggest goat to eat.They dress up in costumes, each for their own purpose.They use tone of voice and body language for their purposeCopyright © 2010, MindWing Concepts, Inc. • 1-888-228-9746 • Web: www.mindwingconcepts.com

They must use what they think, know, remember and realize things, to trick the troll.

They must take the troll’s perspective about his thinking about them?

They show that they have taken the perspective of the troll:

They decide to go over the bridge in order of size, hoping that the greedy troll with want the biggest goat to eat.

They dress up in costumes, each for their own purpose.

They use tone of voice and body language for their purpose

Copyright © 2010, MindWing Concepts, Inc. • 1-888-228-9746 • Web: www.mindwingconcepts.com Theory of Mind (Perspective Taking or Point of View) The “Theory of Mind” is the ability to reason about the thoughts, feelings, and intentions of self and others. (Premack & Woodruff 1978) “Mindblindness” is a term that characterizes the difficulty that people with autism have with reading the mental states of others: thoughts, feelings and beliefs…. Baron-Cohen, S. (1995). Mindblindness: An essay on autism and theory of mind. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

“Children with ASD who develop language skills, particularly skills in understanding Sentence Complementation, are able to use their language knowledge to solve Theory of Mind Tasks.” K. Cain & Oakhill (Eds.) 2007, Children’s Comprehension Problems in Oral and Written LanguageNY: The Guilford Press Sentence Complementation is a sentence-level language skill that allows for the elaboration of the verb phrase. In young children, adverbs and prepositional phrases are linguistic means to provide verb phrase elaboration. Addition of conjunctions and mental state verbs, over time complete this complex sentence structure. Copyright © 2010, MindWing Concepts, Inc. • 1-888-228-9746 • Web: www.mindwingconcepts.com

K. Cain & Oakhill (Eds.) 2007, Children’s Comprehension Problems in Oral and Written Language

Copyright © 2010, MindWing Concepts, Inc. • 1-888-228-9746 • Web: www.mindwingconcepts.com Example of Sentence Complementation using mental state verbs; the broad strand of advanced sentence structure to incorporate and express mental state verbs within the Theory of Mind. Lauren, age 5 years 2 months upon giving her grandmother a mint to eat. “I was going to get it for myself but I realized you would want a mint because I know you like mints”. Her overall intention is expressed: I was going to get it for myself. (intrapersonal thinking) Nana’s perspective taken: Nana would want a mint. (interpersonal thinking) Mental state verbs used: “realized you would want a mint because I know you like mints.”This comes from a prior experience in episodic memory when Nana communicated verbally, or nonverbally, that she liked mints. (affective) Conjunctions used to form advanced verb phrase development: “but I realized you would want a mint because I know you…” Note: Conjunctions such as “and, first, next, after that…” are early developing conjunctions. Those in the above sentence are a more advanced language form.Pronomial reference: “it.” She provided a pronoun for the actual item since “it” was being presented to the communicative partner in real time. Embedding of clauses within a sentence is noted.

Her overall intention is expressed: I was going to get it for myself. (intrapersonal thinking)

Nana’s perspective taken: Nana would want a mint. (interpersonal thinking)

Mental state verbs used: “realized you would want a mint because I know you like mints.”

Conjunctions used to form advanced verb phrase development: “but I realized you would want a mint because I know you…”

Note: Conjunctions such as “and, first, next, after that…” are early developing conjunctions. Those in the above sentence are a more advanced language form.

Pronomial reference: “it.” She provided a pronoun for the actual item since “it” was being presented to the communicative partner in real time.

Embedding of clauses within a sentence is noted.

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