Mike Milestones Presentation CESSE 2003

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Information about Mike Milestones Presentation CESSE 2003
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Published on October 22, 2007

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The IEEE Milestones in Electrical Engineering and Computing Program:  The IEEE Milestones in Electrical Engineering and Computing Program Presented to CESSE 2003 by Michael N. Geselowitz, Ph.D., Director, IEEE History Center 16 July 2003 IEEE Milestones Program History:  IEEE Milestones Program History “Prehistory” began with joint designation in 1977 IEEE History Center established in 1980 Formal Program established in 1983, 1st dedication in ‘85 Honors significant achievements in the history of all IEEE fields of interest (e.g., electrical, electronic and information sciences and engineering) Multi-step process (approx. 1 year) proposed by any IEEE organizational unit nominated by appropriate IEEE Section endorsed by IEEE History Committee, then approved by the IEEE Executive Committee Section sponsors plaque, arranges and sponsors ceremony IEEE Milestones Program Goals:  IEEE Milestones Program Goals Foster among IEEE members an appreciation for and involvement with their professional history Increase at the local level public understanding and awareness of the history of IEEE (and all) technologies & their impacts on society Encourage preservation of archival & physical remains of that history IEEE Milestone Requirements:  IEEE Milestone Requirements Must be at least 25 years old Must represent a significant engineering achievement (or achievements), i.e., must be nontrivial solution to problem Must have impact, but impact can be only of local significance Must be secure, accessible and appropriate location for plaque IEEE Milestones Program Status:  IEEE Milestones Program Status Info/forms available on Web 51 to date, 8 co-designated Program accelerating Worldwide coverage Most recent: Panama Canal electrical controls (Panama) Bletchley Park codebreaking work (UK) Marconi’s earliest wireless experiments (Switzerland) 3 nominations and 14 proposals in-house IEEE Milestones Locations as of 2002:  IEEE Milestones Locations as of 2002 Benjamin Franklin's Work in London, 1757-1775:  Benjamin Franklin's Work in London, 1757-1775 Benjamin Franklin, American electrician, printer, and diplomat, spent many years on Craven Street. He lived at No. 36 between 1772 and 1775 and at No. 7 from 1757-1762 and again from 1764-1772. During these years, Franklin popularized the study of electricity, performed experiments, and served as an advisor on lightning conductors. London, England, UK. Dedicated March 2003 Landing of the Transatlantic Cable, 1866:  Landing of the Transatlantic Cable, 1866 A permanent electrical communications link between the old world and the new was initiated at this site with the landing of a transatlantic cable on July 27, 1866. This achievement altered for all time personal, commercial, and political relations between peoples on the two sides of the ocean. Five more cables between Heart's Content and Valentia, Ireland were completed between 1866 and 1894. This station continued in operation until 1965. Heart’s Content, Newfoundland, Canada Dedicated June 1985 County Kerry Transatlantic Cable Station, 1866:  County Kerry Transatlantic Cable Station, 1866 On July 13, 1866 the Great Eastern steamed westward from Valentia, laying telegraph cable behind her. The successful landing at Heart's Content, Newfoundland on July 27 established a permanent electrical communications link that altered for all time personal, commercial and political relations between people across the Atlantic Ocean. Later, additional cables were laid from Valentia and new stations opened at Ballinskelligs (1874) and Waterville (1884), making County Kerry a major focal point for global communications. County Kerry, Ireland. Dedicated July 2000 Vulcan Street Plant, 1882:  Vulcan Street Plant, 1882 Near this site on September 30, 1882, the world's first hydroelectric central station began operation. The station, here reproduced, was known as the Vulcan Street Plant and had a direct current generator capable of lighting 250 sixteen candle power lamps each equivalent to 50 watts. The generator operated at 110 volts and was driven through gears and belts by a water wheel operating under a ten foot fall of water. Appleton, WI, USA. Dedicated September 1977 (co-designated by ASCE, ASME) Georgetown Steam/Hydro Generating Plant, 1900:  Georgetown Steam/Hydro Generating Plant, 1900 Electric generating plants, through their high-voltage lines, provided critical power to the isolated mines in this region. Georgetown, completed in 1900, was unusual in employing both steam and water power. Its owner, United Light and Power Company, was a pioneer in using three-phase, 60-Hertz alternating current and in being interconnected with other utilities. Georgetown, CO, USA. Dedicated July 1999 Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer, 1946:  Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer, 1946 A major advance in the history of computing occurred at the University of Pennsylvania in 1946 when engineers put the Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer (ENIAC) into operation. Designed and constructed at the Moore School of Electrical Engineering under a U. S. Army contract during World War II, the ENIAC established the practicality of large scale, electronic digital computers and strongly influenced the development of the modern, stored-program, general-purpose computer. Philadelphia, PA, USA. Dedicated September 1987 First Wearable Cardiac Pacemaker, 1957-58:  First Wearable Cardiac Pacemaker, 1957-58 During the winter of 1957-58, Earl E. Bakken developed the first wearable transistorized pacemaker, at the request of heart surgeon, Dr. C. Walton Lillehei. As earlier pacemakers were AC-powered, this battery-powered device liberated patients from their power-cord tethers. The wearable pacemaker was a significant step in the evolution to fully-implantable units. Minneapolis, MN, USA. Dedicated October 1999 NAIC/Arecibo Radiotelescope, 1963:  NAIC/Arecibo Radiotelescope, 1963 The Arecibo Observatory, the world's largest radiotelescope, was dedicated in 1963. Its design and implementation led to advances in the electrical engineering areas of antenna design, signal processing, and electronic instrumentation, and in the mechanical engineering areas of antenna suspension and drive systems. The drive system positions all active parts of the antenna with millimeter precision, regardless of temperature changes, enabling the telescope to maintain an accurate focus. Its subsequent operation led to advances in the scientific fields of radioastronomy, planetary studies, and space and atmospheric sciences. Arecibo, PR, USA. Dedicated November 2001 (co-designated by ASME) Electronic Technology for Space Rocket Launches, 1950-1969:  Electronic Technology for Space Rocket Launches, 1950-1969 The demonstrated success in space flight is the result of electronic technology developed at Cape Canaveral, the J. F. Kennedy Space Center, and other sites, and applied here. A wide variety of advances in radar tracking, data telemetry, instrumentation, space-to-ground communications, on-board guidance, and real-time computation were employed to support the U.S. space program. These and other electronic developments provided infrastructure necessary for the successful landing of men on the moon in July 1969 and their safe return to earth. Cape Canaveral, FL, USA. Dedicated February 2001

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