Meetings PowerPoint Content

100 %
0 %
Information about Meetings PowerPoint Content
Business-Finance

Published on October 16, 2008

Author: ReadySetPresent

Source: authorstream.com

Program Objectives : Program Objectives Develop a meeting plan. Define roles that contribute to making a meeting more effective. Identify and practice behaviors that help build a team. Learn and practice techniques to better manage your meetings. Deal constructively with behaviors that may hinder effectiveness. Evaluate the quality of meetings. Slide 3: Identify the things that go wrong at meetings and brainstorm ways to overcome these problems. Describe the difference between process and content. Gain knowledge of four meeting types: information sharing, gathering, problem solving, decision making and planning/strategizing. Program Objectives Slide 4: Discuss and practice several meeting methods: brainstorming, agenda, free-field analysis, group consensus and the action register. Gain knowledge of the importance of careful meeting preparation. Write meeting objectives. Plan a meeting agenda. Program Objectives Slide 5: Write a means to inform participants about the meeting. Design an opening statement of the purpose of the meeting. Describe the importance of follow-up after the meeting and be aware of the group method. Identify the difference between task functions and group relations functions. Program Objectives Slide 6: Recognize some different personalities and learn some tips for handling some group interaction problems. Participate in a meeting with prepared notes and agenda. Create an action plan for meeting effectiveness. Complete post work assignment to participants’ satisfaction. Program Objectives A Challenge : A Challenge Please write a one sentence definition of RUNNING EFFECTIVE MEETINGS. Definition Of A Meeting : Definition Of A Meeting A coming together of an assembly. Why Have A Meeting : Why Have A Meeting To solve a problem. To make a decision. To develop a plan. To gather or convey information. To get a response to information. To obtain approval/reach consensus. To establish understanding/rapport. To clarify responsibilities. To create a sense of teamwork. Meetings Are Unproductive (1 of 2) : Meetings Are Unproductive (1 of 2) Purpose of the meeting is unclear. There is no agenda/organization. The leader tries to accomplish too much. The meeting starts late. Too many people are at the meeting. Meetings Are Unproductive (2 of 2) : Meetings Are Unproductive (2 of 2) The leader loses control. One person dominates the meeting. Individuals wander from the topic. Individuals go back over old items. No clear direction/no clear conclusions are reached. Where to Begin : Where to Begin So where does the conductor of a meeting begin? With an AGENDA! Creating An Agenda : Creating An Agenda State the purpose of the meeting. Organize items to be discussed in order of their importance, starting with top-priority topics. Describe each item to be discussed, and explain why it must be addressed. Set time limits prior to discussion. Conducting a Productive Meeting (1 of 3) : Conducting a Productive Meeting (1 of 3) Set up the meeting room to encourage an open exchange. Post the agenda in a visible place. Start the meeting on time. State the meeting’s purpose, and briefly review agenda items and the time allocated to each. Conducting a Productive Meeting (2 of 3) : Tackle urgent agenda items first, then move on to the rest ("musts" then "wants"). Clearly resolve each agenda item before moving on. Conducting a Productive Meeting (2 of 3) Conducting a Productive Meeting (3 of 3) : Record important points on a flip chart. If others are reporting to the group, emphasize time allotment. End meetings on time, summarize main points or conclusions reached. Schedule another meeting to continue or to follow up on actions stemming from the meeting. Conducting a Productive Meeting (3 of 3) Arriving At Consensus : Arriving At Consensus Encourage participants to fully communicate their thoughts. Emphasize positives. Weigh the seriousness of the negatives. Continue summing up the areas of agreement. Stages In Team Development : Stages In Team Development Confusion over roles that members see themselves playing, tasks to be performed, and the type/sources of leadership. People understand the task or group objective and the roles they play as individuals, but are not yet group members. Group Roles & Behaviors : Group Roles & Behaviors Confronting Gatekeeping Mediating Harmonizing Supporting Summarizing Process-Observing Group Roles & Behaviors (1 of 7) : Group Roles & Behaviors (1 of 7) Confronting: Insisting that the group deal with the issues that the group wants to avoid. Group Roles & Behaviors (2 of 7) : Group Roles & Behaviors (2 of 7) Gatekeeping: Providing opportunities for all members of the group to contribute. Group Roles & Behaviors (3 of 7) : Mediating: Intervening to clarify the respective positions of two or more disputants. Group Roles & Behaviors (3 of 7) Group Roles & Behaviors (4 of 7) : Harmonizing: Finding areas of agreement in the arguments of two or more members of the group. Group Roles & Behaviors (4 of 7) Group Roles & Behaviors (5 of 7) : Supporting: Reinforcing the right of a group member to speak or to have his or her opinion discussed. Group Roles & Behaviors (5 of 7) Group Roles & Behaviors (6 of 7) : Summarizing: Summing up various or even divergent contributions. Group Roles & Behaviors (6 of 7) Group Roles & Behaviors (7 of 7) : Process-Observing: Commenting on what goes on in the group. Group Roles & Behaviors (7 of 7) Negative Roles/Behaviors : Negative Roles/Behaviors Shutting Off Biased Analyzing Dominating Yes - Butting Nay - Saying Negative Roles/Behaviors (1 of 5) : Negative Roles/Behaviors (1 of 5) Shutting Off: Silencing members by interrupting, subject changing, or putting down. Negative Roles/Behaviors (2 of 5) : Biased Analyzing: Putting labels on or suggesting motives for another's behavior. Negative Roles/Behaviors (2 of 5) Negative Roles/Behaviors (3 of 5) : Dominating: Taking over and preventing other contributions. Negative Roles/Behaviors (3 of 5) Negative Roles/Behaviors (4 of 5) : Yes - Butting: Seeming to agree/respect another's position right away, before challenging its validity. Negative Roles/Behaviors (4 of 5) Negative Roles/Behaviors (5 of 5) : Nay - Saying: Being negative about ideas/suggestions before they are considered by the whole group. Negative Roles/Behaviors (5 of 5) Group Meeting Record : Group Meeting Record Date, time, names of and number attended, length, location. Subject(s) covered. Questions where more information is needed. Any problems encountered. Outsiders in attendance. Other comments. Reasons for Meeting Failures : Reasons for Meeting Failures Unclear motives for meeting. Lack of trust between management and non-management. Inadequate supports by upper management. Incorrect information provided. Under-preparation. Open criticism, lack of sincerity, retaliation for negative comments. Effective Meeting Notes (1 of 5) : Effective Meeting Notes (1 of 5) 1. Set defined time limits. 2. Start on time regardless of late arrivals. Consider closing the door to emphasize attendee tardiness. Tips to short meetings: Effective Meeting Notes (2 of 5) : 3. Start with most important item and work down your list. Attention is greater at start of meeting. 4. Interrupt talkers. Stop individuals from dominating discussion. 5. Try standing -- sends message of short meeting. Tips to short meetings: Effective Meeting Notes (2 of 5) Effective Meeting Notes (3 of 5) : 6. Only attend necessary meetings. Pass meeting to subordinates if practical and possible. 7. Is meeting necessary? Memo, conference call, e-mail a better route / alternative. 8. Limit motives to those whose presence are necessary to accomplish meeting goals. Attending Meetings: Effective Meeting Notes (3 of 5) Effective Meeting Notes (4 of 5) : 9. Sit in back at larger meetings and skip out without notice. 10. Ask to be excused after area of importance to you has been covered. 11. No way to leave - read other materials or think of other projects to complete. Attending Meetings: Effective Meeting Notes (4 of 5) Effective Meeting Notes (5 of 5) : 12. Hold meeting outside of office if possible. This allows you go out if meeting gets off subject. 13. Cut down on regularly scheduled meetings that lack continual purpose and productivity. 14. Avoid impromptu meetings that aren’t important at the moment. “Can I see you for a moment?” Effective Meeting Notes (5 of 5) Attending Meetings: Guidelines for Effective Meetings (1 of 3) : Guidelines for Effective Meetings (1 of 3) Adequate Presentation: Establish necessity of meeting and decide what objective of meeting is to be. Outlining: Outlines for a meeting help you to stay on topic and know where to proceed during the meeting. This also helps to define and lay out goals for the meeting. Guidelines for Effective Meetings (2 of 3) : Conflicts: Try to anticipate objections and be prepared to counter them if they are brought up. Meeting Times: Schedule meetings when people’s attention spans are higher. Avoid late nights, Fridays afternoons and weekends. Guidelines for Effective Meetings (2 of 3) Guidelines for Effective Meetings (3 of 3) : Start on time. Start by briefly stating purpose of meeting. Note: Have someone else take notes throughout meeting. Guidelines for Effective Meetings (3 of 3) Two Types of Meetings : Two Types of Meetings Informational Problem Solving Two Types of Meetings (1 of 2) : Two Types of Meetings (1 of 2) Informational Purpose: To pass on information. Group Leader Two Types of Meetings (2 of 2) : Problem Solving Purpose: To combine group knowledge and experience to arrive at an agreeable solution to a common problem. Group Leader Two Types of Meetings (2 of 2) Information Sharing/Gathering (1 of 7) : Information Sharing/Gathering (1 of 7) It is a way to air views on a subject – to find out where the group stands on an issue. Everyone has the opportunity to participate. It is an excellent way to develop a commitment to results. It usually precedes Problem Solving and Decision Making meetings. Information Sharing/Gathering (2 of 7) : Methods: Brainstorming Agenda Meetings Information Sharing/Gathering (2 of 7) Information Sharing/Gathering (3 of 7) : Methods: Brainstorming A technique used by a group of people that encourages their collective thinking power to create ideas. Information Sharing/Gathering (3 of 7) Information Sharing/Gathering (4 of 7) : Action Steps: Define the purpose/objective. Review the ground rules. Give participants a few minutes to think about the subject and to jot down some ideas. Ask for ideas and record all ideas. End the brainstorming session when all of the ideas have been expressed. Brainstorming Information Sharing/Gathering (4 of 7) Information Sharing/Gathering (5 of 7) : Methods: Agenda Meeting Can be used whenever most of the group members have one or more short subjects to cover. Information Sharing/Gathering (5 of 7) Information Sharing/Gathering (6 of 7) : Action Steps: Is this a subject I need most or all of the group for? (this weeds out those subjects that are better handled one-on-one or in small groups) Passing along information Seeking information? Looking for suggestions/ideas? Agenda Meetings Information Sharing/Gathering (6 of 7) Information Sharing/Gathering (7 of 7) : Make a list of subjects – identifying each subject with the name of the person who suggested it. Decide how much time to give each person/subject based on the allotted time for the meeting. Choose a person to begin and proceed “round table” until all of the items are completed. Information Sharing/Gathering (7 of 7) Agenda Meetings Action Steps: Problem Solving Meeting (1 of 6) : It is used to bring about a change or an improvement. In most organizations, the information and problems, their causes, as well as the resources for developing and implementing solutions are often dispersed. A problem solving meeting can bring together a group of people with different experience to work toward creative solutions. Problem Solving Meeting (1 of 6) Problem Solving Meeting (2 of 6) : Brainstorming (see previous slides) Problem Solving Meeting (2 of 6) Methods: Force Field Analysis Problem Solving Meeting (3 of 6) : Methods: Force Field Analysis A technique that helps a group decide the forces at work in a given situation. The underlying assumption is that every situation results from a balance of forces: restraining forces and driving forces. Problem Solving Meeting (3 of 6) Problem Solving Meeting (4 of 6) : A benefit of this technique is that it forces the group to examine strengths and weaknesses. Problem Solving Meeting (4 of 6) Methods: Force Field Analysis Problem Solving Meeting (5 of 6) : Establish the change/improvement to be made. Brainstorm the restraining and driving forces. Select some problems to eliminate and some strengths to build on in order to bring about the change. Problem Solving Meeting (5 of 6) Action Steps: Force Field Analysis Problem Solving Meeting (6 of 6) : We want to improve ………… Strengths/Driving Forces Problems/Restraining Forces Problem Solving Meeting (6 of 6) Decision Making (1 of 5) : Decision Making (1 of 5) As the name implies, it is used to reach a decision/solution. Group members need to know what is expected of them. The final decision may be made by the group – or – the group may be used to supply information, but an individual makes the decision. Decision Making (2 of 5) : A great source of frustration in organizations is a lack of decision making parameters (who has responsibility for each decision). Involving people in the decision making process who must ultimately approve, or accept or implement a decision is the basis for many Quality Circle programs (i.e., participant management). Decision Making (2 of 5) Decision Making (3 of 5) : Group Consensus Decision Making (3 of 5) Methods: Decision Making (4 of 5) : Group Consensus A technique that uses discussion and participation to help a group reach an agreement which does not compromise any strong convictions or needs of individual members (avoid voting and compromising). Decision Making (4 of 5) Methods: Decision Making (5 of 5) : Make lists of advantages/disadvantages. Rank your alternatives. Establish criteria to evaluate each alternative. Consider what others have done. Establish a rule that before group members voice criticisms, they must first say what they like about an idea. Decision Making (5 of 5) Action Steps: Group Consensus Planning/Strategizing (1 of 5) : Planning/Strategizing (1 of 5) This is a future oriented meeting – often including a problem solving component. The outcome is usually a description of an ideal state and the sequence of action steps needed to achieve it. Planning/Strategizing (2 of 5) : All givens/constraints must be outlined up front (budget, time frames, etc.). Members may be given specific tasks to accomplish as a result of this type of meeting. Planning/Strategizing (2 of 5) Planning/Strategizing (3 of 5) : Action Planning Planning/Strategizing (3 of 5) Methods: Planning/Strategizing (4 of 5) : Action Planning Action Planning: identifies the specific steps to be accomplished in order to implement an idea. The Action Register: is a tool for capturing the group’s plan in writing. Planning/Strategizing (4 of 5) Methods: Planning/Strategizing (5 of 5) : Identify and review the action steps to be accomplished in order to implement an idea. Ask for volunteers for action items. Assign the remaining items. Request realistic completion dates. Summarize the action register. Express your confidence. Planning/Strategizing Planning/Strategizing (5 of 5) Action Steps: Tips & Techniques : Tips & Techniques Only 22% of all meetings are rated as extremely productive by participants. Make It Your Best Meeting : Make It Your Best Meeting Establish goals. Control interruptions. Manage time well. Meeting Tips. Before the Meeting (1 of 2) : Establish a Purpose and a Goal. Determine the best medium: in-person, video, audio or net conferencing. Before the Meeting (1 of 2) Before the Meeting (2 of 2) : Before the Meeting (2 of 2) Consider participants unable to attend. Set up voice mail so they may listen at their convenience. Distribute information via email or fax. Agenda and Goals : Agenda and Goals Create a participant list. Include: date, time and location. As The Moderator : As The Moderator Vary the tone of your voice. Speak clearly and avoid background noise. As The Moderator : As The Moderator Stick to the agenda. Control interruptions. Anticipate problems and be prepared with solutions. Remain enthusiastic. After The Meeting : After The Meeting Distribute minutes, action items and other important information via voice mail, fax, and/or email. Common Outcomes : Common Outcomes One of the most common outcomes of INEFFECTIVE MEETINGS is. . M o r e M e e t i n g s… . . . . Before The Meeting (1 of 5) : Before The Meeting (1 of 5) 1. Define the purpose of the meeting. 2. Develop an agenda with the key participants. Use an agenda form. 3. Distribute the agenda and circulate background material, documents or articles prior to the meeting to prepare participants and get them involved and up-to-speed. Before The Meeting (2 of 5) : Before The Meeting (2 of 5) 4. Choose a meeting time. Set a time limit and stick to it! Members have other commitments. They will be more likely attend meetings if they are productive, predictable and short. 5. Arrange the room so members face each other, i.e., a circle or semi-circle. For large groups, consider a U-shape. Before The Meeting (3 of 5) : Before The Meeting (3 of 5) 6. Choose a location suitable for your group's size. Small rooms can get stuffy and create tension when filled with too many people. Larger rooms are more comfortable and encourage individual participation. Before The Meeting (4 of 5) : Before The Meeting (4 of 5) 7. Use visual techniques to enhance and maintain interest (e.g. posters, diagrams). Post a large agenda up front for reference. Before The Meeting (5 of 5) : Before The Meeting (5 of 5) 8. Vary the meeting place to accommodate different members. Be sure everyone knows where and when the next meeting will be held. During The Meeting (1 of 2) : During The Meeting (1 of 2) 1. Welcome participants, even late members when appropriate. 2. Consider light refreshments; they are icebreakers and allow members to feel more comfortable and special. During The Meeting (2 of 2) : During The Meeting (2 of 2) 3. Start on time. End on time. Always! 4. Review the agenda and set priorities for each meeting. 5. Stick to the agenda. Running Effective Meeting (1 of 5) : Running Effective Meeting (1 of 5) 1. Encourage group discussion to bring out all views and ideas. You will derive better decisions and more motivated participants who will feel that attending your meetings is worth their while. Running Effective Meeting (2 of 5) : Running Effective Meeting (2 of 5) 2. Encourage feedback. Ideas, activities and participant commitment to your organization improve when partici- pants see the direct impact on the decision making process. Running Effective Meeting (3 of 5) : Running Effective Meeting (3 of 5) 3. Keep conversation focused. Stay on track and request only constructive and non- repetitive comments. Tactfully end discussions when they are going in circles, getting nowhere or becoming destructive or unproductive. Running Effective Meeting (4 of 5) : Running Effective Meeting (4 of 5) 4. Keep minutes for the meeting as a future reference in case a question or problem arises. 5. Leaders are role models. They listen and show interest, appreciation and confidence in participants. Admit your mistakes. Running Effective Meeting (5 of 5) : Running Effective Meeting (5 of 5) 6. Summarize agreements that are reached and end the meeting. Always end on a unifying or positive note. Have participants offer thoughts on events they feel have been good or successful, or reiterate the organization's mission. 7. Set a date, time and place for the next meeting. After The Meeting (1 of 4) : After The Meeting (1 of 4) 1. Write up and distribute minutes and action items within 2-3 days. Quick action reinforces the importance of your meeting and reduces memory errors and misinterpretation or mutation. After The Meeting (2 of 4) : After The Meeting (2 of 4) 2. Discuss any problems during the meeting with others; develop methods for improvement. 3. Follow-up on delegated actions and decisions. Check in and review for participant understanding and follow through of their responsibilities. After The Meeting (3 of 4) : After The Meeting (3 of 4) 4. Show recognition and appreciation for excellent and timely progress. 5. Move unfinished business from your meeting to the agenda for your next meeting. After The Meeting (4 of 4) : After The Meeting (4 of 4) 6. Conduct a periodic evaluation of your meetings. Note areas to be analyzed and improved. Create or use a sample meeting evaluation. Common Scheduling Problems (1 of 7) : Common Scheduling Problems (1 of 7) 1. A date and time is announced. You discover that some important participants can not attend. Now, another date has to be found. 2. Participants are polled for their availability. They are given so few choices that one common date can not be found. Common Scheduling Problems (2 of 7) : Common Scheduling Problems (2 of 7) 3. Your meeting is confirmed. Then the date needs to be changed. 4. A meeting location is specified, then changed in another memo. Participants who do not receive the second message end up at the wrong location. Common Scheduling Problems (3 of 7) : Common Scheduling Problems (3 of 7) 5. So many messages are circulating around about a proposed meeting. Now there is even confusion about what, when, where and if there is a meeting is. 6. Someone uses an intranet-based scheduling tool which works internally. Now outside participants are left out. Common Scheduling Problems (4 of 7) : Common Scheduling Problems (4 of 7) 7. Someone uses a common scheduling system, posts and updates schedules on an intranet. After the initial enthusiasm, people do not update schedules, or do not want to show their availability to everyone. So, less and less time becomes available for your meeting/s. Common Scheduling Problems (5 of 7) : Common Scheduling Problems (5 of 7) 8. When you finally have a meeting scheduled, you find out that the location is already booked. 9. Someone forgot to send out a reminder about the meeting. Now, several people do not show up. Common Scheduling Problems (6 of 7) : Common Scheduling Problems (6 of 7) 10. People are so frustrated just working to set up meetings that they stop doing it, or will not volunteer. Common Scheduling Problems (7 of 7) : Common Scheduling Problems (7 of 7) OUTCOMES. An enormous amount of time is wasted. A high degree of inefficiency is apparent. A ton of money has been blown into the wind. Scheduling Hints (1 of 4) : Scheduling Hints (1 of 4) First, ask if “you need” to schedule a meeting, or if you might delegate this. If delegated, make sure you give clear instructions. Scheduling Hints (2 of 4) : Scheduling Hints (2 of 4) Some items you want to be clear on from the beginning are: who must be there, and who is optional. can participants send a designate (someone to go in their place?). Scheduling Hints (3 of 4) : Scheduling Hints (3 of 4) Some items you want to be clear on from the beginning are: whose schedule will be the most challenging to work around? Will others need to change their schedules to accommodate this person? is it more important to find a common time for everyone, or a time when most people (including the required attendees) can meet? Scheduling Hints (4 of 4) : Scheduling Hints (4 of 4) Some items you want to be clear on from the beginning are: what type of room or facility do you need and what audiovisual or computer equipment is required? will the meeting need to be catered, and will it require coffee and tea or a full lunch? Taking Minutes – Notes (1 of 8) : Taking Minutes – Notes (1 of 8) Make certain that all of the essential elements are noted, such as type of meeting, name of the organization, date and time, name of the chair or facilitator, main topics and the time of adjournment. For formal and corporate meetings, include approval of previous minutes and all resolutions. Taking Minutes – Notes (2 of 8) : Taking Minutes – Notes (2 of 8) Prepare an outline based on the agenda ahead of time, and leave plenty of white space for notes. By having the topics already written down, you can jump right on to a new topic without pause. Taking Minutes – Notes (3 of 8) : Taking Minutes – Notes (3 of 8) Prepare a list of expected attendees and check off the names as people enter the room. Or, you can pass around an attendance sheet for everyone to sign as the meeting starts. Taking Minutes – Notes (4 of 8) : Taking Minutes – Notes (4 of 8) To be sure about who said what, make a map of the seating arrangement, and make sure to ask for introductions of unfamiliar people. Taking Minutes – Notes (5 of 8) : Taking Minutes – Notes (5 of 8) Don't make the mistake of recording every single comment, but concentrate on getting the gist of the discussion and taking enough notes to summarize it later. Remember that minutes are the official record of what happened, not what was said, at a meeting. Taking Minutes – Notes (6 of 8) : Taking Minutes – Notes (6 of 8) Use whatever device is comfortable for you: a notepad, a laptop computer, a tape recorder, a steno pad, or shorthand. Many people routinely record important meetings as a backup to their notes. Taking Minutes – Notes (7 of 8) : Taking Minutes – Notes (7 of 8) Be prepared! Study the issues to be discussed and ask a lot of questions ahead of time. If you have to fumble for understanding while you are making your notes, they won't make any sense to you later. Taking Minutes – Notes (8 of 8) : Taking Minutes – Notes (8 of 8) Don't wait too long to type up the minutes, and be sure to have them approved by the chair or facilitator before distributing them to the attendees. Don't be intimidated, you may be called upon many times to write meeting minutes, and the ability to produce concise, coherent minutes is widely admired and valued. Slide 113: What is your next step? Action Plan : What are you going to take action on? Start with the three easiest items. Action Plan Action Steps : Action Steps List specific behaviors. Be as systematic as possible. Rank the behaviors in terms of their complexity or degree of difficulty. Rank the behaviors in terms of chronological order. Begin with the least difficult behavior. Advance to a more difficult behavior. Break difficult behavior down into several smaller behaviors. Action Steps : Attach time limits to each behavior. Repeat specific behavior until mastered. Review all previous behaviors. Advance to next most difficult behavior. Measure and evaluate. Keep records (preferably visual). Reinforce through reward and punishment. Use visual reminders (pictures, charts, etc.). Remember: ("A small goal is enough!"). Action Steps

Add a comment

Related presentations

Related pages

Present PowerPoint slides in a Lync Meeting - Lync

Presenting PowerPoint slides is an effective way to get your ideas across, and make your presentation memorable by focusing on bulleted items and avoiding ...
Read more

PowerPoint Presentation Content - Meetings

Meetings PowerPoint Presentation Content slides include topics such as: why meetings are unproductive, 7 group roles and behaviors, effective meeting notes ...
Read more

Meetings Powerpoint Content - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Meetings Powerpoint Content – A free PowerPoint PPT presentation (displayed as a Flash slide show) on PowerShow.com - id: 3ab824-YzAxN
Read more

Meetings PowerPoint Content: Andrew E. Schwartz ...

Meetings PowerPoint Content [Andrew E. Schwartz] on Amazon.com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Ready, Set, Present (PowerPoint Content): Meetings ...
Read more

Meetings (Modern) PowerPoint Content - scribd.com

134 slides include: why meetings are unproductive, conducting a productive meeting, group roles and behaviors, effective meeting notes, guidelines for ...
Read more

Publishing PowerPoint Presentations in Connect Meetings

There are different techniques that a Connect content author or Connect Meeting Host may employ to publish PowerPoint content in Adobe Connect Meetings ...
Read more

Download PowerPoint Slide Presentation Software, PPT

Build the story and present with clarity. With PowerPoint for Android™ tablet, get the power of productivity when you need it. Build the story and ...
Read more

Skype for Business Online Meetings - technet.microsoft.com

Skype for Business Meetings provide the ability for up to 250 people to collaborate online by using features such as video, audio, instant ...
Read more