Making Good progress

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Information about Making Good progress
Education

Published on October 11, 2008

Author: aSGuest734

Source: authorstream.com

Making Good Progressin KS2 Mathematics : Making Good Progressin KS2 Mathematics Focusing on progression : Focusing on progression Key questions In what ways do we track for progression across the school and in each class? How is this information used to identify those children who are making slow progress? Which children and specific groups of children are currently identified through our tracking? What actions are we taking to support these children? Slide 3: Key Stage 2 Maths (2007) Slide 4: High Attaining Pupils: Key Stage 2 Maths (2007) Slide 5: School Pupil Progression Chart Paste from RAISEonline – Mathematics Instruction on adding pupil progression charts from RAISEonline Once you have logged onto RAISEonline and found the Pupil Progression chart you want in your presentation, you need to; On the ‘select a format’ drop down menu, choose ‘Acrobat (PDF) file’ Click on ‘Export’ Click on ‘Open’ Once you have the PDF open, click on tools, select ‘Select & Zoom’ and click on Snapshot tool. Using the cursor select the area you want to copy to your presentation. When you let go of the left click on your mouse it should say ‘Selected area has been copied’ – Click ok. Go to the power point slide, right-click on mouse and select paste. You can adjust the chart size using the circles in each corner of the image Discussion (1) : Discussion (1) Consider the national pupil progression charts for Key Stage 2 mathematics and the school’s own charts: How does the school’s charts compare to the national ones? Who are the children in your class who are potentially ‘slow moving’ or ‘falling behind’? What are some of the reasons for these pupils making slow progress in mathematics? Investigating progress in mathematics at Key Stage 2 (1) : Investigating progress in mathematics at Key Stage 2 (1) The findings presented on subsequent slides arise from two separate investigations focusing on ‘slow movers’ in mathematics, identified in terms of conversion from Level 2 at KS1 to Level 4 at KS2 and from Level 3 at KS1 to Level 5 at KS2 The schools involved in the investigations were selected on the basis of their KS1 to KS2 conversion rates A relatively small sample of 39 schools was chosen Investigating progress in mathematics at Key Stage 2 (2) : Investigating progress in mathematics at Key Stage 2 (2) The investigations included: Focused discussions with approximately 230 children in Year 4 and Year 6 Discussions with headteachers, subject leaders & teachers The findings have been cross-checked with evidence obtained by Ofsted, the National Strategies and the Training and Development Agency for Schools (TDA) and appropriate actions agreed with these partners Pen portrait of ‘slow moving’children in mathematics (1) : Pen portrait of ‘slow moving’children in mathematics (1) The children: were often girls were generally well behaved and had a positive approach to learning were often described as ‘invisible’ children didn’t like answering questions in front of the class tended to work on their own would sit with their hand up but not always be noticed Pen portrait of the ‘slow moving’ children in mathematics (2) : Pen portrait of the ‘slow moving’ children in mathematics (2) Children struggling to make progress from Level 2 to Level 4: lacked self confidence judged how good they were by the number of ticks and crosses in their books usually persevered with the task set, especially when it was routine and of limited challenge produced neat work that was set out in the required way Pen portrait of the ‘slow moving’ children in mathematics (3) : Pen portrait of the ‘slow moving’ children in mathematics (3) Children struggling to make progress from Level 3 to Level 5: were tentative and cautious when starting a new topic liked to be able to get on with their work liked discussing and working in pairs or small groups – so long as the pupils were of similar ability – but did not do this often wanted to be taught more as a small group could distinguish between getting all the answers right and developing understanding did not like wasting time liked quiet thinking time knew that maths is important and wanted to do well Pen portrait of the ‘slow moving’ children in mathematics (4) : Pen portrait of the ‘slow moving’ children in mathematics (4) A small number of the children struggling to make progress from Level 3 to Level 5: tended to be over-confident and rushed their work, often making mistakes were competitive and wanted to finish first were demanding of the teacher’s attention and misbehaved if ignored often wasted time if they finished early Slide 13: Do you have pupils in your class that fit these profiles? Which of the characteristics most closely match those of the children in your class who are potentially ‘slow moving’ or ‘falling behind’? Discussion (2) ‘Slow moving’ pupils starting at Levels 2 and 3 in mathematics : ‘Slow moving’ pupils starting at Levels 2 and 3 in mathematics Do you have pupils who struggle to explain their thinking and methods? have difficulty in remembering and using mathematical vocabulary? lack flexibility with number, for example, they struggle to identify related facts from those they know? tend to rely on one method when calculating and solving problems? struggle with problems, particularly those that involve two or more steps? lack self help strategies? Obstacles hindering progression from Level 2 to Level 4 in mathematics (1) : Obstacles hindering progression from Level 2 to Level 4 in mathematics (1) Typically pupils were weak at mental calculation - they had few mental calculation skills and were reluctant to use them had difficulty in keeping intermediate information in their heads had a preference for using formal written methods which they considered better than mental methods, but made mistakes Obstacles hindering progression from Level 2 to Level 4 in mathematics (2) : Obstacles hindering progression from Level 2 to Level 4 in mathematics (2) Typically pupils lacked images and models such as number lines to help with visualising mathematics experienced a low level of challenge and tended to work within their comfort zone developed a low appetite for risk taking Obstacles hindering progression from Level 3 to Level 5 in mathematics (1) : Obstacles hindering progression from Level 3 to Level 5 in mathematics (1) Typically pupils had a range of mental calculation skills but had difficulty selecting the most efficient method were better at adding and multiplying mentally than subtracting and dividing were not aware of the importance of reading a calculation and deciding whether to do it mentally, with jottings or use a formal written method had difficulty with understanding place value of decimals and relating fractions to their decimal representations Obstacles hindering progression from Level 3 to Level 5 in mathematics (2) : Obstacles hindering progression from Level 3 to Level 5 in mathematics (2) Typically pupils were familiar with visual images such as number lines but did not appreciate the value of them to aid calculation had difficulty seeing the relationships and connections in mathematics did not understand division had weak calculator skills Discussion (3) : Discussion (3) Which of the descriptions and obstacles to progress are most pertinent to the pupils you teach? What all ‘slow moving’ pupils in Key Stage 2 need in mathematics (1) : What all ‘slow moving’ pupils in Key Stage 2 need in mathematics (1) Activities and approaches to help engage pupils in mathematical thinking To use mathematical vocabulary and language to express their explanations and thinking with other pupils and their teacher in all mathematics lessons Confidence and greater flexibility with number and calculation through shared discussion about links and how alternative methods work What all ‘slow moving’ pupils in Key Stage 2 need in mathematics (2) : What all ‘slow moving’ pupils in Key Stage 2 need in mathematics (2) To explore and focus on how and why different methods work rather than just on the answer, e.g. devising questions for a fixed answer, exploring when statements are true and false, matching linked facts Time and support in developing independent learning and self-help strategies, e.g. comparing approaches when stuck, referring to displays, etc. What pupils need to support progression in mathematics from Level 2 to Level 4 : What pupils need to support progression in mathematics from Level 2 to Level 4 A greater focus on the use of mental calculation strategies To develop a range of mental calculation strategies through guided teaching to help them choose efficient methods Support in deciding when a mental or written method is more appropriate and why To see, use and evaluate different approaches to solving a problem More opportunities to use images and models to help with visualising mathematics e.g. using number lines more flexibly A greater level of challenge, including experience of working in a range of different groups Support and encouragement to take risks so that they are less anxious about always getting the right answer What pupils need to support progression in mathematics from Level 3 to Level 5 : What pupils need to support progression in mathematics from Level 3 to Level 5 Practice on how to ‘read’ calculations and decide on the most efficient approach Paired and small group work to explore and evaluate different methods and approaches Further guidance on the use and value of visual images to aid calculation Time to explore relationships and connections in mathematics e.g. between fractions, decimals and percentages To address their weaknesses with division, e.g. through strengthening the links between subtraction and division and helping them to see the relationship between multiplication and division Practice in using a calculator in activities that involve mental calculation strategies and reasoning Discussion (4) : Discussion (4) Next steps What do you think are the key issues arising from this session for the school? How can they be addressed at senior leader, subject leader and class teacher levels?

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