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LT1053N 01 2007

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Information about LT1053N 01 2007
Education

Published on February 4, 2008

Author: Reginaldo

Source: authorstream.com

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LT1053N Introduction to Facilities Management:  LT1053N Introduction to Facilities Management Lecture 1 Facilities Management: Definitions and Concepts LT1053N Introduction to Facilities Management:  LT1053N Introduction to Facilities Management What is Facilities Management ? What is the thinking behind it ? What does it seek to achieve ? To answer these questions: Compare DEFINITIONS Analyse KEYWORDS Identify CONCEPTS Useful reading:  Useful reading Alexander, K (ed) (1996) Facilities Management: Theory and Practice London: E & FN Spon Introductory Sections and Chap.1, Keynote Paper, ‘Facilities Management: a strategic framework’ Jones, C and Jowett, V (1988) Managing Facilities Oxford: Butterworth-Heinemann Chap 1, ‘The concept and scope of facilities management’ Some formal definitions of FM:  Some formal definitions of FM “Facilities Management is the integration of multi-disciplinary activities within the built environment, and the management of their impact upon people and the workplace” (BRITISH INSTITUTE OF FACILITIES MANAGEMENT, 1996) Some formal definitions of FM:  Some formal definitions of FM “The practice of co-ordinating the physical workspace with the people and work of an organisation, integrating the principles of business administration, architecture, and the behavioural and engineering sciences” (BRITISH INSTITUTE OF FACILITIES MANAGEMENT, 1996) Some formal definitions of FM:  Some formal definitions of FM “The process by which an organisation delivers and sustains support services in a quality environment to meet strategic needs” (CENTRE FOR FACILITIES MANAGEMENT, 1996) Keywords:  Keywords integration co-ordination multidisciplinary built environment management impact people workplace workspace support services deliver sustain quality environment strategic needs Analysing keywords:  Analysing keywords integration . . . synthesising, bringing together, making whole or complete co-ordination . . . facilitating, organising FM brings together skills, knowledge and expertise drawn from many different fields also has applications across many sectors Different provider sectors (Many are SERVICE SECTOR industries):  Different provider sectors (Many are SERVICE SECTOR industries) business commerce manufacturing retail management sport and leisure tourism heritage arts and entertainment hospitality management patient care airports and stations public utilities Different disciplines:  Different disciplines Business-related disciplines Accounting Business Law Portfolio Development Sector-specific disciplines Retail Management Arts Management Engineering-related disciplines Electrical engineering Heating and ventilation Different disciplines:  Different disciplines Built environment - related disciplines Architecture Interior Design Planning Services Engineering Service-related disciplines Buildings maintenance Housekeeping Outsourcing Different providers:  Different providers Public Sector (Local Authorities) Private or Commercial Sector Voluntary and Charitable Sectors Partnership Provision (between sectors) The Built Environment:  The Built Environment BUILDINGS Architect-designed structures which enclose internal spaces, provide shelter, allow the creation of an indoor environment LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE Imaginative complementary planning of the external environment Man-made environments:  Man-made environments Some built environments are entirely man-made, and include: Leisure pools Shopping malls Airport concourses Theme parks Holiday villages (‘Center Parcs’) Integrated facility provision (e.g., complexes which combine retail, leisure, hospitality and entertainment) Influence of international practice:  Influence of international practice United States Japan Finland Sweden Germany Netherlands Hong Kong Singapore International practice has great influenced the development of FM in the UK You should try where you can to make some comparisons in your coursework Space allocation and planning:  Space allocation and planning Space management is an important facet of facilities management, along with: Anthropometrics - the study of the shape, proportion and size of the human body, and Ergonomics - the study of work and movement Collectively these have major implications for the design of the work environment and we will study them in depth later in the course The changing nature of FM:  The changing nature of FM Facilities Management is in transition Is currently evolving: from a largely technical discipline into a business management discipline from a reactive, operationally-focused set of processes to a pro-active and strategic one one which sees buildings as being dynamic entities and assets on the balance sheet, not as liabilities FM and postmodern thought:  FM and postmodern thought In postmodern thinking relationships of all kind - e.g., between work and leisure - are in constant flux Workplaces, workspaces and leisure and shopping spaces are changing also New electronic technologies have major contributions to make in a myriad of ways In FM, for example, ‘intelligent buildings’ The growth in facilities management is dynamic and explosive, geared to accommodating this rapid and often unpredictable change “The process by which an organisation delivers and sustains support services in a quality environment to meet strategic needs” (CFM, 1996):  “The process by which an organisation delivers and sustains support services in a quality environment to meet strategic needs” (CFM, 1996) SUPPORT SERVICES Communications systems Security systems Maintenance services Catering services Cleaning services Such systems need to be developed, improved, maintained and updated throughout the entire life of the building FM and Quality “ . . . in a quality environment”:  FM and Quality “ . . . in a quality environment” total quality management embraces the entire business environment - both physical and perceptual “Facilities management is a total quality approach to sustaining an operational environment and providing support services to meet the strategic needs of an organisation” (CENTRE FOR FACILITIES MANAGEMENT, 1996) FM and Strategic Needs:  FM and Strategic Needs the needs are those of the many stakeholders – all those who have a legitimate interest in the performance of the building the process is strategic and pro-active - planned ahead, with clear operational objectives, which anticipate and respond to user need Strategic FM Objectives:  Strategic FM Objectives The contemporary built environment is one of planned high ambience, operating in a climate of ever-increasing user expectation Strategic FM objectives reflect this quest for excellence, and include: Design for PERFORMANCE Design for QUALITY Design for COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE Strategic FM Objectives:  Strategic FM Objectives DESIGN FOR PERFORMANCE Ensuring that buildings perform to the highest possible standard - optimising performance, ensuring peak efficiency Making them adaptable, versatile, to fully accommodate and respond to the widest possible spectrum of user need Buildings performance is an important concept which we will return to later Strategic FM Objectives:  Strategic FM Objectives DESIGN FOR QUALITY Ensuring a high ambience environment and complementary, high quality support services DESIGN FOR COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE Being simply the best there is Maintaining competitive edge Maximising profitability Buildings Performance:  Buildings Performance Three facets: Physical performance Functional performance Financial performance Buildings Performance PHYSICAL PERFORMANCE:  Buildings Performance PHYSICAL PERFORMANCE The behaviour of the fabric, fittings, services and finishes, including aspects such as: Structural integrity Internal environment (heating, lighting, etc) Energy efficiency Cleanliness Maintainability Durability Environmental impact Buildings Performance FUNCTIONAL PERFORMANCE Aspects which directly benefit the occupier:  Buildings Performance FUNCTIONAL PERFORMANCE Aspects which directly benefit the occupier Space (quantity, quality) Layout Ergonomics Image (including internal and external landscaping) Ambience Amenity Movement Communications Health and Safety Flexibility Responsiveness to user need Buildings Performance FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE:  Buildings Performance FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE Stemming from the physical and functional performance of the building and the way in which it is used: Capital and revenue expenditure Rate of depreciation Investment value Contribution overall to organisational profitability and business efficiency Useful websites:  Useful websites British Institute of Facilities Management (BIFM) http://www.bifm.org.uk p://www.bifm.org.uk Centre for Facilities Management (CFM) http://www.cfm.salford.ac.uk/ttp://www.cfm.strath.ac.uk/index.htm

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