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Love McCabe summary

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Education

Published on February 13, 2008

Author: Michelino

Source: authorstream.com

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HUI TAUMATA 2005:  HUI TAUMATA 2005 Key Findings Hon Parekura Horomia:  Hon Parekura Horomia Building capability and developing partnerships Future prosperity is linked to Maori participation in the economy Need strong leadership Maori must be accountable Effective governance is vital Globalisation is a challenge to face Hon Parekura Horomia:  Hon Parekura Horomia Partnership is key aspect No place for complacency Need to raise educational standards Increase diversity of business Participate in the global economy Maori participation is about “bottom-up” Rt Hon Helen Clark:  Rt Hon Helen Clark Here to chart new pathways for the future Maoridom gathers here from a position of strength The most important focus is on looking forward Tamariki are critical to our common future Everyone must have the chance to succeed Maori success is crucial to New Zealand’s success Incredible journey of development which Maori must continue to lead Rt Hon Helen Clark:  Rt Hon Helen Clark Maoridom itself is supplying the navigators Government’s role is to ensure that New Zealand’s growth and development continues Maori development requires leadership, commitment, good strategies and policies There is no room for complacency, the status quo, or for going back to policies of the past Committed to a bold agenda and to working with Maori to realise their potential Sir Paul Reeves:  Sir Paul Reeves The vision is to expand Maori economic pathways Create, grow and succeed in our future together Hui Taumata is neither the start nor the end but a time to reflect, reset and recharge for the generations ahead It is a catalyst This hui is geared towards innovative and revolutionary thinking, practical and sustainable solutions We are here for the long haul Ensuring that although we may create and succeed in the economic stakes, our identity as Maori evolves and is neither compromised nor lost Shane Jones:  Shane Jones Maori are at a “turning point” – we have a youthful Maori population and an unprecedented demographic profile Cultural determination has been prominent in the last two decades We have restored pride in culture, revitalised our language and recovered resources We must learn and practice adaptation, innovation, risk taking Maori now need to set the agenda for Maori economic development success Shane Jones:  Shane Jones Increase our confidence Generate solutions for ourselves Reinforce that Maori are positive contributors to the economy Key challenge is addressing poor educational outcomes for Maori at the secondary level Role of wananga is an important part of the solution Key component to our economic future is international trade. For example, free trade agreement with China Our 20 year rite of passage is over Maori creative contribution will shape the nation’s global identity Moana Maniapoto:  Moana Maniapoto Moana spoke from a personal perspective – the greatest Maori asset is people The hardest place in the world to be Maori is New Zealand. Maori identity is generally extremely well-received overseas, and often resonates with people at a deep level Maori need to ensure that they are taking Maori identity to the world, not having it taken off them Moana Maniapoto:  Moana Maniapoto Maori have some loose cannons, like any other people, but are overall a strong, talented and beautiful people Advocated that Maori revisit their core values Build their own and each other’s self belief Need to grow teachers who will teach analytical skills Maoridom has successfully resisted cultural mummification Sarah Reo:  Sarah Reo Sarah talked about her experience starting up a business with her partner Jason Fox She and Jason dreamed of gaining financial freedom by contributing to the improvement of bicultural communication in the public sector Embarked on a couple of hard years, moving in with Jason’s parents Received a great deal of advice – some positive, some negative Their self-belief slowly grew with success Sarah noted that their greatest business adversary had been themselves Sarah Reo:  Sarah Reo They had to train themselves to be resilient Lateral thinking led them to conceive of Cultureflow as a system Mayoral delegation to China led to prototype for teaching English to Mandarin speakers Are partnering with Innaworks, with cutting edge mobile phone technology Advocates having a big dream, solid infrastructure, constant sacrifice and integrity as the keys to success Wally Stone:  Wally Stone Practitioner’s view of Maori economic development and commercial enterprise Three key building blocks. Purpose is about capturing the vision Structure is about an appropriate business vehicle People is about expertise Enterprise skills are also life skills. Ability to hear, see and absorb information; analyse information; communicate clearly what you want to achieve; confidence; act on decisions; ability to add value and improve Wally Stone:  Wally Stone Success factors for Maori enterprise development include Removing politics from enterprise Know when to cooperate and when to compete Need to add value to themselves and become price makers In the global market, Maori must add to NZ’s share, participation and voice Developing Enterprise/ Entrepreneurship:  Developing Enterprise/ Entrepreneurship Rod Oram Entrepreneurship can be taught Need the urge, teachers, courses and mentors, opportunities and resources Recent survey shows Maori have the highest levels of entrepreneurship Developing Enterprise/ Entrepreneurship:  Developing Enterprise/ Entrepreneurship Graham Pryor Successful innovation requires diligence, persistence and stick-ability Concentrate on building Maori enterprise for much longer periods – build to survive for 100 years Entrepreneurship can be learned Developing Enterprise/ Entrepreneurship:  Developing Enterprise/ Entrepreneurship Hinerangi Edwards Creating new entrepreneurs Allow people to make mistakes Need to have teachers and mentors Create models - share ideas Developing Enterprise/ Entrepreneurship:  Developing Enterprise/ Entrepreneurship Key points made / agreed in workshops Create a culture of expectation Encourage our young people to aspire to excellence Expectations of success start at home Publicise successful Maori business to build a climate of success Extend our networks Provide mentors who are exceptional role models Developing Enterprise/ Entrepreneurship:  Developing Enterprise/ Entrepreneurship Key points made / agreed in workshops continued Build sustainable networks Education – in schools, homes, work Creating opportunities e.g. incubators, think tanks Developing a best practice tool kit – business planning, coaching/mentoring system - clinics using the sports model Developing Enterprise/ Entrepreneurship:  Developing Enterprise/ Entrepreneurship Summary of key points agreed Encourage the indigenisation of entrepreneurship from a young age starting with whanau and extending into the formal education system Investment in entrepreneurship education, coaching, mentoring and networking initiatives to promote entrepreneurship Developing Enterprise/ Creative Sector:  Developing Enterprise/ Creative Sector Robyn Bargh We need courage, determination and vision Articulate original ideas, describe Maori identity as a unique point of difference for New Zealand Need to build on new art forms of our tupuna We need partnership – national, international and indigenous Developing Enterprise/ Creative Sector:  Developing Enterprise/ Creative Sector Rewi Spraggon New Zealand undervalues the art sector We react rather than create trends and force change Need a training infrastructure implemented into the development of our artists, marketing and taxation Most important thing in the creative sector is to continue creating Developing Enterprise/ Creative Sector:  Developing Enterprise/ Creative Sector Willie Jackson Broadcasting is an integral part of Maori development We must invest in our story being told, not just talking about money We need a strategy that will ensure that our stories are told properly in the mainstream Developing Enterprise/ Creative Sector:  Developing Enterprise/ Creative Sector Cliff Curtis Film and television can strengthen our identity – imagination will come in an endless supply We must ensure that we do not sell our souls, our identity, what it means to be Maori Developing Enterprise/ Creative Sector:  Developing Enterprise/ Creative Sector Summary of key points agreed The challenges for the creative sector are: Integrity Innovation Investment Infrastructure Create a synergy between the creative sector and other sectors, leverage the benefits from those industries/activities Need to explore brand “Maori” not just in the creative sector across our entire lifestyle as Maori Enterprise/Globalisation:  Enterprise/Globalisation Robin Hapi Equip our managers with the best skills and experiences Cooperate more between industries Maori involved in trade delegations and missions Greater uptake of international training opportunities Promote our products in a coordinated way Enterprise/Globalisation:  Enterprise/Globalisation Oscar Nathan Create a culture of success Outward, but also about bringing the world here Enterprise/Globalisation:  Enterprise/Globalisation Charles Royal Maori need to radically rethink what it means to be Maori Maori need to develop distinctive, innovative products Enterprise/Globalisation:  Enterprise/Globalisation Ross Wilson Globalisation has both positive and negative effects Strong case for substantial education and work-based training initiative for rangatahi and workplace learning for pakeke Innovation can come from people in the workplace, employees can add value Enterprise/Globalisation:  Enterprise/Globalisation Key points made Using our intellectual property in creative ways, ways that give uniqueness and competitiveness We need a Maori venture capital fund in order to launch our products globally Attention needs to be given to ethics of doing business globally Greater investment in R & D needed – areas such as science and engineering are a priority Enterprise/Globalisation:  Enterprise/Globalisation Key points made Recommend the establishment of a Centre for Indigenous Global Innovation to produce training, access to markets and information Need more information and understanding of what globalisation is, so we can raise global warriors Developing Assets:  Developing Assets Tahu Potiki Developing assets is never easy, lots of diversions, tribal politics, traditional attachments to land, parochial decision making, conservative, risk averse governance Three key factors: Clarity of purpose Getting the right people Communicate well – clearly articulate expectations Developing Assets:  Developing Assets Rob McLeod Strong interdependence of the Maori economy and the New Zealand economy On a labour market basis, the economic value that could be achieved by closing the gap between Maori and non-Maori unemployment rates could be a lump payment of $15 billion On an income basis, huge value is to be gained from closing the income gap between Maori and non-Maori. Comparing the income gap on the basis of the average wage, this could mean a lump sum payment in the order of $41 billion. (Treaty settlements - $715 million.) Developing Assets:  Developing Assets Rob McLeod Key to closing the gap is to focus on Maori education and skills development The most valuable asset for Maori is their human capital, the return on investment from education and training, and the economic power within human capital across Maoridom The corporate model is superior to the trust model because shareholders have greater leverage over assets and business managers Developing Assets:  Developing Assets Rob McLeod Nepotism is not necessarily a problem and could be helpful in respect of the strong ethics governing family relationships. When it is a problem, it is more to do with the functioning of the agent/principal relationships Increased Maori labour and investment activity is critical We need to gain more support from others to support Maori entrepreneurs Developing Assets / Export and International Business:  Developing Assets / Export and International Business Craig Norgate Maori should be immensely proud of progress in the last 20 years, but is this sufficient for Maori as a people? Need to provide for basic needs and capability development Reality check – only Fonterra is a global player Priorities: collective ownership, primary industries, and a commitment to investment in future development Need to grow business in primary industries Developing Assets / Export and International Business:  Developing Assets / Export and International Business Paul Morgan One Maori company has good export revenue: Sealord Group We need economies of scale What it takes to cash in on trends: Market information/intelligence Invest in customer relationships Need companies that have significant sales revenue Put tribal issues aside – focus on cooperation and how those assets can be managed Developing Assets / Export and International Business:  Developing Assets / Export and International Business Shaan Stevens Our focus should be on quality and margins Understand what people want Maori have an advantage when it comes to interpersonal relationships: the ‘what do you want approach’, not ‘I can tell you what you want’ You have what you have – the real question is how many people know what you have got Education goes hand in hand with business because education is going to be the key to unlock our future Developing Assets / Export and International Business:  Developing Assets / Export and International Business John Whitehead Economic development for Maori is linked with the development of the economy as a whole Make the case for people to buy our goods and services rather than wait for them to come to us Economic development should have a strong emphasis on developing the skills of Maori people Ensure that the purpose of assets and entities are clear Spend time on the ground in overseas markets Developing Assets / Export and International Business:  Developing Assets / Export and International Business Key points agreed in workshops Build a Maori expatriates network Build and form alliances here and overseas Make cooperation a reality Invest in knowledge Understanding the global market, requirements, development needs Developing Assets / Export and International Business:  Developing Assets / Export and International Business Key points agreed in workshops Continuing focus on wananga education that moves beyond cultural revitalisation Invest in key partnerships and relationship management Develop connections for small and medium sized businesses Ensure that we have research and development Developing Assets / Capital:  Developing Assets / Capital Adrian Orr To create economic growth you need: More inputs (capital and labour) More outputs per input – productivity Different outputs per input – innovation Investment principles should include clear goals and objectives, a long term growth strategy Skills, knowledge, experience and resources are essential to implementing a sound investment plan Developing Assets / Capital:  Developing Assets / Capital Adrian Orr Maori investment challenges include: education attainment, skills, knowledge, experience, location, assets, property rights, access to capital, governance In 2025 Maori will be setting the global benchmark for indigenous people in sustainable development Developing Assets / Capital:  Developing Assets / Capital Fred Cookson To create commercially savvy Maori organisations we need to have sound, effective governance/financial management/reporting systems in place Tony Hannon Maori need to consider entering into private investment arena Get in and give investment a go Developing Assets / Capital:  Developing Assets / Capital Workshops – key findings We need to move from low to high risk and learn to manage Collaboration Need a commercial focus for commercial business, but that doesn’t exclude consideration of the cultural imperative Attracting capital will require getting the right purpose, structure, people and investments Benchmark ourselves against the highest performers Create strategic alliances Diversify across all sectors and build excellence in all Expose managers offshore with successful companies Retain/control ownership Developing Assets / Capital:  Developing Assets / Capital Workshops – key findings Build collaborative clusters Invest in market research and research and development Gains: set aside a percentage of the gain for capital investment Amalgamate farming, fishing, forests and assets from TOW claims Gather highly qualified, skilled, passionate Maori expertise into think tanks or fora and build the capability amongst rangatahi Separate governance and corporate activities Role of the trust/governance structure – vision and wealth distribution Corporate structure – creation of wealth Developing Assets / Governance:  Developing Assets / Governance Tony Craig The rigour applied to the recruitment and performance of CEs is not applied to board members Effective governance requires: Embracing a culture of assessment practices and models Establishing a database of all skills and competencies of current trustees Tailoring learning needs and styles to trustees’ needs Learning and documenting best performance and best practice Ensuring balance and mix of skill on boards Developing Assets / Governance:  Developing Assets / Governance Mai Chen Maori need to have a legislative strategy Leadership needs to use specialists who will transfer skills Maori need to learn to use the law to their advantage and the resources available to them to build their own capability Developing Assets / Governance:  Developing Assets / Governance Kirsten Kohere Lack of Maori women’s participation at the governance level Ensure Maori decision makers have sufficient Maori identity Improve the professional development of current governors Establish Maori leadership programmes and increase mentoring opportunities Developing Assets / Governance:  Developing Assets / Governance Temuera Hall Business does not care what language you speak, what colour your skin is or what religion you belong to Business is receptive to morals, principles and values as Maori. It is our culture - its philosophy, its values and its morals - that is our point of difference Key aspects to governance: Compliance, accountability, transparency, risk management Vision, strategic direction Good Maori governance needs to be continually looking to set up the generation ahead Consolidation is a necessity Huge efficiency gains to be made by jointly managing assets Developing Assets / Governance:  Developing Assets / Governance Key points agreed in workshops Education and training for existing workforce Succession planning Good quality management systems Achieving a balance between tikanga and technical expertise on governance bodies Communicating and reporting back regularly to constituents Share information on successful practice De-mystifying governance to whanau – encourage their participation and involvement Developing Assets / Governance:  Developing Assets / Governance Key points agreed in workshops Cultural values – develop a short to medium term strategy that promotes the transfer of cultural knowledge Establish a mentoring programme that integrates traditional values and sound governance principles to eliminate skill deficit Developing People:  Developing People Mason Durie “The potential within the Maori population has never been greater” After the 1984 Hui significant transformation occurred The question is whether new transformative experiences are needed to take Maori into the future Developing People:  Developing People Mason Durie Goals for the future create a focus on: High achievement and quality outcomes Enhanced whanau capacities Collaboration Governance and leadership Maori workforce capacity We need a dedication to long-term planning so future generations “might live as Maori and as citizens of the world” Developing People:  Developing People Kuni Jenkins Wananga is a test as to what lifelong learning might be Knowledge is power – academics talk about power in a particular way. Maori have their own ideas about power Look to the past to provide models for the future Out of partnership (working with others) comes the ability to facilitate access to knowledge and skills Developing People / Learning for Life:  Developing People / Learning for Life Dr Catherine Love We need to build on: Revitalised identity, language and culture Our tamariki are our taonga Our survival instinct Our huge uptake of education throughout our lives Our participation in Maori educational institutions Relationships that we are already forming with other indigenous peoples Developing People / Learning for Life:  Developing People / Learning for Life Dr Catherine Love Continuing focus on wananga education that moves beyond cultural revitalisation Partnerships and collaborations between polytechnics, universities and wananga – as equals (cross crediting arrangements) The removal of the cap on enrolments for wananga Greater representation and control in the Tertiary Education Commission and the New Zealand Qualifications Authority Developing People / Learning for Life:  Developing People / Learning for Life Susan Reid There are things we need to let go of and things we need to hold on to Workforce participation is important – ‘good enough’ is no longer good enough All school leavers need qualifications We need to identify what was successful and why it was successful Developing People / Learning for Life:  Developing People / Learning for Life Keith Ikin Need to ensure people have transferable skills so that they can move to new jobs We need more industry involvement We need a revamp the curriculum and our approach to education – learning by doing Developing People / Learning for Life:  Developing People / Learning for Life Key points agreed at workshops Provide better access to training (especially tertiary) in remote and rural areas Bring back and grow trade training Investment in quality in all education Investment in outcomes – defined by, designed by and delivered by Maori in partnership Investment in competence, capability and capacity – as defined by Maori Developing People / Learning for Life:  Developing People / Learning for Life Key points agreed at workshop Make an impact on the content of education Increase Maori participation in education leadership Make skills development and life long learning a whanau priority through accessibility, affordability, etc Adult education programmes at the workplace to engage on skill needs for the future Developing People / Cultural Capital:  Developing People / Cultural Capital Professor Whatarangi Winiata Maori economic leaders of 2025 “Maori” first and an “economic leader” second “Maori” includes being an active contributor to the long term survival of Maori as a people They will adopt indices of genuine progress expressed in values and avoid outdated and misleading indices such as Gross National Product (GNP) and Gross Domestic Product (GDP) Te Wananga o Raukawa teaches models of the promotion and measurement of wellbeing. Of the 17 variables in these models, financial wealth, land and fisheries are but three. Developing People / Cultural Capital:  Developing People / Cultural Capital Claudette Hauiti Maori leaders of 2025 Maori in the industry are creators. Maori creators of today need to be business people who take care of the creators They will be bilingual An even split between companies run by tane and wahine The majority will be urban based because of resources Core business will include TV and film making Developing People / Cultural Capital:  Developing People / Cultural Capital Garry Nicholas Must identify, nurture and empower rangatahi to be what they want to be Struggle of the artist/the creator Not currently a lot of cross fertilisation even within the creative industry Developing People / Cultural Capital:  Developing People / Cultural Capital Key points agreed in workshops “Success-ploitation” – create an environment where it’s okay to be successful – showcasing role modeling, normalising and targeting rangatahi through PR campaigns, leaderships, incubators Multi-values – creates balanced leaders with multi-value skills primarily founded on cultural values Maori Brown Table: build an echelon of Maori businesses to spearhead and normalise a Maori round table that has strong collective beliefs Succession planning / future proofing Leadership tools that are kaupapa Maori based Success-ploitation begins with whanau – normalise leadership Developing People / Cultural Capital:  Developing People / Cultural Capital Key points agreed in workshops Grow the leadership potential of all our rangatahi Secure resources to establish a Maori leadership institute Develop and implement succession plans focused on tomorrow’s leaders for implementation by today’s leaders Maintain our tikanga without compromise Recognise and nurture leadership potential in everyone Recognise and define the generic set of traits and attributes that underpin leadership The emphasis on excellence is vital – excellence across all areas, including kaupapa and tikanga People / Rangatahi:  People / Rangatahi Hana O’Regan Maori and educationalists need to take responsibility for factors impacting on Maori under-achievement Requires mind shift from individualist pursuit of wealth to notion of collective responsibility. Also requires a strong Maori culture base Need to instill a sense of responsibility back into being Maori Investment needs to be both educational and cultural Investment in quality childcare and education Eradicate: Tall poppy, slash and burn virus Apathy, which is a direct descendant of dependency, e.g. “I deserve something as of right” mentality People / Rangatahi:  People / Rangatahi Key points made Youth of today can expect to have at least 4 career changes throughout their working life Young people need to emerge from school with a wide range of skills that are transferable to different work places At the very least we should expect all students emerging from school to be literate, numerate and techno-literate Our rangatahi need to be inspired to become passionate about something and we need to raise our expectations of them so that they in turn reach for the stars People / Rangatahi:  People / Rangatahi Key points made Teachers need support structure around them, need to utilise outside resources to leave them free to ‘inspire’ young minds Parents need to take responsibility for children’s learning, to engage and support teachers We need to strengthen identity We need to take responsibility for our own health, be better role models for rangatahi The government cannot fix it. Maori need to re-direct and take control of the effort People / Rangatahi:  People / Rangatahi Key points made Teach children core values Instill in our tamariki knowledge and understanding of roles Empower rangatahi by ensuring they have skills that can be transferred to whatever jobs exist in 20 years Parental involvement is crucial How do we get rangatahi back onto the marae? Pakeke need to be more open to rangatahi Parents need to rekindle the passion to succeed within their children People / Rangatahi:  People / Rangatahi Workshops – key findings Key qualities that inspire, motivate and impassion rangatahi are: discipline and determination, focus, planning and inclusion in decision making Inspiring rangatahi to dream and see the big picture starts from the home and whanau Develop ability to change, to shift between jobs/focus through life People / Rangatahi:  People / Rangatahi Workshops – key findings The need to coordinate a strategy between government and Maori is imperative Enact rangatahi specific policies at marae, hapu and iwi levels. Set high benchmarks and expectations Encourage broad choice in formal education subjects, broad range of experiences, positive images of enterprise Ensure rangatahi gain transferable skills including transferable vocational and cultural skills Summary:  Summary We have delivered to you our reflections of the hui as it has unfolded over the past 2½ days This provides the context for the pathway forward that will be presented later today Our key priorities clearly sit with how we unleash potential in: Maori enterprise Asset growth and management; and People development

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