Literacy Leadership Teams

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Information about Literacy Leadership Teams
Education

Published on March 20, 2014

Author: kennymckee

Source: slideshare.net

Description

Learn the process of developing Literacy Leadership Teams in secondary schools. Information is based upon research and the experiences of two high school literacy coaches who developed multiple school-based teams.

Literacy Leadership Teams:Literacy Leadership Teams: The Secret to Successful SecondaryThe Secret to Successful Secondary SchoolsSchools Laura Mayer and Kenny McKee High School Literacy Coaches, Buncombe County Schools NCETA Conference September 28, 2012

What are you Hoping to Learn Today?What are you Hoping to Learn Today? I want to learn what an LLT is and how it benefits schools. I know what an LLT is, and I want to begin one in my school. I am part of an LLT and looking for guidance or new ideas. Another reason... http://www.polleverywhere.com/multiple_choice_polls/MzY4MDk2NDY4

Session GoalsSession Goals I can articulate the purpose, composition, and evolution of Literacy Leadership Teams. I can plan the first steps to initiating a LLT at my school.

ResourcesResources  Craig, P. S. (2010). Literacy Leadership Teams: Collaborative Leadership for Improving and Sustaining Student Achievement. Larchmont, NY: Eye on Education.  Lent, R. C. (2007). Literacy Learning Communities: A Guide for Creating Sustainable Change in Secondary Schools. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.  Ogle, D., & Lang, L. (2011). Best Practices in Adolescent Literacy Instruction. In L. M. Morrow & L. B. Gambrell (Eds.), Best practices in literacy instruction (pp. 138-173). New York, NY: The Guilford Press.

What is an LLT?What is an LLT? An LLT is a cross- section of teachers and administrators who are committed to working in a collaborative group to identify areas of concern and to set goals for student achievement.

Unpacking the TermsUnpacking the Terms Literacy . . . ◦ Reading ◦ Writing ◦ Thinking ◦ Speaking ◦ Doing Leadership . . . ◦ Communication ◦ Change ◦ Flexibility ◦ Focus ◦ Knowledge ◦ Accountability ◦ Visibility

Unpacking the TermsUnpacking the Terms Team . . . (as opposed to “committee”) Turn & Talk: How are teams different from committees?

How does an LLT benefit theHow does an LLT benefit the school as a whole?school as a whole? Students learning the skills to be successful in all subjects. Engaged students who need less disciplining. Stronger professional relationships between peers. Data and research influence gradual changes rather than ever-changing professional development “fads”.

What are the benefits of joining anWhat are the benefits of joining an LLT?LLT? Teacher’s voice being heard, resulting in school-based decision-making and less top-down management. A better understanding of students’ needs. Chances to learn and practice new strategies. Being seen as a teacher-leader.

How does an LLT affect studentHow does an LLT affect student achievement?achievement? The LLT develops a Literacy Plan that: ◦ Creates a vision for the school and explores how literacy strategies look in different content areas. ◦ Analyzes student and teacher data, ◦ Participates in ongoing professional dialogue and makes instructional decisions based on school needs. ◦ Collaborates with colleagues to spread effective strategies throughout the school.

Who should be asked to join?Who should be asked to join? In short, teachers who are RESPECTED because of 1 or more of the following:  They are good communicators.  They are diplomatic and open to listening to various views.  They demonstrate a commitment to students.  They inspire their peers and stay positive.

Possible LLT Membership at myPossible LLT Membership at my School . . .School . . . Communicator Open Committed to Students Positive

So, how do I get started?So, how do I get started? (years 1-2)(years 1-2)

Team BuildingTeam Building A car does not run on gas alone.

April/May 2010 Choose team members with written or spoken invitations from principal. Set aside extended planning time (2-3 full days’ time) for team to begin meeting. May-August 2010 First team planning. (Icebreaker to establish comfort/determine strengths/establish protocols; team discusses vision for the school, defines literacy, and identifies issues hindering student achievement. May-September 2010 Data analysis - 1. High stakes testing – longitudinal/disaggregated data to help determine concern areas; 2. Collect other data to validate assumptions; 3. Determine need for other data to guide practices to meet student achievement. June-October 2010 Investigate research about conclusions from data. Fall 2010 Using data and research, begin developing a literacy plan for the school. Plan no more than 2 instructional practices and one infrastructural change to begin. Fall/Spring 2010-2011 Begin professional development with the team to give them professional experiences with the practices they have researched. Spring 2011 Finalize the plan with SMART goals in order to later assess its effects. 2011-2012 School Year Professional development is facilitated at the beginning of the year and sustained throughout the year. Team must be prepared to counter resistance and validate teachers making efforts. August 2011 Literacy team introduces the plan to faculty. The plan takes precedence over all other professional development. Professional development supports the plan; it doesn’t seem extra or unrelated. Literacy Leadership Team Timeline – Clyde A. Erwin High SchoolYear 1

Year 2

What happens after year one . . . • Demonstration lessons & reflections • Rounds • Workshop series • PLC coaching . . . Depends on school’s focus & needs

School Size Approximate Demographics Current LLT Age Current LLT Goals survey A.C. Reynolds High School 1.342 student s Economically Disadvantaged – 39% LEP – 3% Students with Disabilities – 11% In its 4th year • Support implementation of literacy instruction based on individual PLC formative assessment data. • Six plan period workshops on different topics based on faculty survey results, including Ben-Q strategies. • Transition from literacy coach-led workshops & meetings to member-led workshops and meetings. • Share resources & model video lessons on school Literacy Moodle Charles D. Owen High School 858 student s Economically Disadvantaged – 48% LEP – 3% Students with Disabilities – 13% In its 3rd year • Public Teaching and Feedback through Rounds and Literacy Week • Spreading targeted strategies in PLC’s based on school needs survey. • Share instructional resources through informal Library/Literacy Lunches. • One whole-faculty session on a literacy need requested by faculty. Clyde A. Erwin High School 1,302 student s Economically Disadvantaged – 58% LEP – 7% Students with Disabilities – 9% In its 3rd year • Whole-Faculty Professional Development on Formative Assessment Topics based on needs survey (such as Total Student Participation). • Development of a District Community Group • Parent workshops on literacy/academic topics • Continuation of fun informal workshops on vocabulary instruction T.C. Roberson High School 1,450 student s Economically Disadvantaged – 35% LEP – 5% Students with Disabilities – 9% In its 4th year • Spreading targeted strategies in departments based on school needs survey. • Six plan period workshops on different topics based on faculty survey results, including Ben-Q strategies. • Transition from literacy coach-led workshops and meetings to member-led workshops and meetings. • Team PD on data conversations that inform instruction. My school. . .

Lessons Learned . . .Lessons Learned . . . Successes Barriers Literacy Week Retreats Themes (superheroes, engagement, peanuts) Voluntary Workshops Google Surveys Peer Reflections Faculty Meeting Presentations Literacy CEUs Teacher Leadership Administrative Support Money Morale Scheduling Article, book studies Blogs Meetings with no agenda

qq Q&A

3-2-1 Countdown3-2-1 Countdown 3 things I can do when I go back to my school 2 questions I still have 1 reason why a Literacy Team would be good for my school

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