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Published on February 6, 2014

Author: artisriva

Source: slideshare.net

Description

Introduction of Linux – History, Distributions
Exploring Command line tools – shells, redirection, pipes
Software Management – RPM, dpkg
Hardware configuration– modprobe, lspci, lsmod, insmod, rmmod
Managing Files – mkdir, cp, rm, grep, find
Administering the system – useradd, usermod, shutdown, crontab, chown
Networking – ifconfig, route, nslookup, ping, samba, ftp, http, mail, ssh, scp

Linux Arti Srivastava

Agenda 1. Introduction of Linux – History, Distributions 2. Exploring Command line tools – shells, redirection, pipes 3. Software Management – RPM, dpkg 4. Hardware configuration– modprobe, lspci, lsmod, insmod, rmmod 5. Managing Files – mkdir, cp, rm, grep, find 6. Administering the system – useradd, usermod, shutdown, crontab, chown 7. Networking – ifconfig, route, nslookup, ping, samba, ftp, http, mail, ssh, scp 2

1. Introduction of Linux – History, Distributions 3

History  In 80’s, Microsoft’s DOS was the dominated OS for PC  Apple MAC was better, but expensive  UNIX was much better, but much, much more expensive. Only for minicomputer for commercial applications  People were looking for a UNIX based system, which is cheaper and can run on PC  Both DOS, MAC and UNIX were proprietary, i.e., the source code of their kernel is protected  No modification is possible without paying high license fees 4

GNU Established in 1984 by Richard Stallman, who believes that software should be free from restrictions against copying or modification in order to make better and efficient computer programs GNU is a recursive acronym for ‚GNU's Not Unix‛ Aim at developing a complete Unix-like operating system which is free for copying and modification Companies make their money by maintaining and distributing the software, e.g. optimally packaging the software with different tools (Redhat, Slackware, Mandrake, SuSE, etc) Stallman built the first free GNU C Compiler in 1991. But still, an OS was yet to be developed 5

Begin Linux   In Sept 1991, Linus Torvalds, a second year student of Computer Science at the University of Helsinki, developed the preliminary kernel of Linux, known as Linux version 0.0.1  Soon more than a hundred people joined the Linux camp. Then thousands. Then hundreds of thousands  6 Andrew Tanenbaum developed Minix, a simplified version of UNIX that runs on PC It was licensed under GNU General Public License, thus ensuring that the source codes will be free for all to copy, study and to change.

 At 25/11/2012 08:31pm, there are 118,240 users and 95,204 machines registered. My guess at the number of Linux users: 63,195,939  World population: 7,096,950,557 Internet users: 2,478,272,151 – Taken from linuxcounter.net 7

Major Software from GNU Project Gcc : c compiler G++: C++ compiler Gdb: source code debugger GNU make: a version of make Bison: a parser generator Bash: command shell GNU emacs: a text editor 8

Linux directory structure / - root directory /bin – essential programs /boot – boot information for linux /dev – includes all devices /mnt – storage devices are mounted /proc – fluid data and status of kernel /sbin – sys admin software /etc – admin related config files and folders /home /lib /tmp /usr /var 9

Linux Variant Suse Redhat Debian Mandrake Ubuntu Centos ScientificOS 10

Desktop Applications Word processing (OpenOffice, Koffice) Programming (C, C++, Perl, Python, Java, PHP) Graphics (GIMP) Web browsers (Mozilla, Konquerer) Email (Evolution, Mozilla, KMail) Audio (amarok) Video (mplayer) Games (MAME) 11

Linux continue to grow… Mobile OS: Android is Linux based  Major Virtualization flavour: Base kernel is Linux  Citrix Xen  Vmware Cloud solution - Openstack 12

13

2. Exploring Command line tools – shells, redirection, pipes 14

Shell  Bash – Baurne Again Shell (Default Shell)  Csh  Tcsh  Zsh  In GUI – xterm, kconsole 15

Shell Configuration Files  Login config files:  ~/.bashrc  ~/.profile  ~/.bash_login  ~/.bash_logout  Global configuration file  /etc/profile  /etc/bash.bashrc  Shell variable  Using Environment variables: env  PATH  alias  set  unset 16

Commands  Change the working directory – cd, cd~, cd /, cd /var/log  Display the working directory – pwd  Display a line of text – echo Hello  Execute a program – exec myprog  Time an operation – time lsof  Total execution time, user cpu time, system cpu time  Set options – environment variables  Terminate the shell  Exit  logout 17

MAN Page  1 Executable programs and shell commands  2 System calls provided by the kernel  3 Library calls provided by program libraries  4 Device files (usually stored in /dev)  5 File formats  6 Games  7 Miscellaneous (macro packages, conventions, and so on)  8 System administration commands (programs run mostly or exclusively  by root)  9 Kernel routines 18

Redirection  > : Creates a new file containing standard output. If the specified file exists, it’s overwritten.  >> : Appends standard output to the existing file. If the specified file doesn’t exist, it’s created.  2> : Creates a new file containing standard error. If the specified file exists, it’s overwritten.  2>> : Appends standard error to the existing file. If the specified file doesn’t exist, it’s created.  &> : Creates a new file containing both standard output and standard error. If the specified file exists, it’s overwritten.  < : Sends the contents of the specified file to be used as standard 19 input.

Redirection continued…  <> : Causes the specified file to be used for both standard input and standard output.  tee command View the command and send the output to another file lsmod | tee lsmod.txt 20

Pipes  ps aux | grep apache  xargs  find ./ -name ‚*~‛ | xargs rm 21

Less is more  more  less 22

3. Software Management – RPM, dpkg, yum, processes 23

Package Concepts  Packages: collection of files  Installed file database  Dependencies  Checksums  Upgrades and uninstallation  Package naming: samba-4.0.12-24.i386.rpm – Package name – Version no – Build no – arhitecture 24

RPM Operations  -i : Installs a package;  -U : Installs a new package or upgrades an existing one  -F or --freshen : Upgrades a package only if an earlier version already exists  -q : Queries a package—finds if a package is installed, what files it contains, and so on  -V or --verify : Verifies a package—checks that its files are present and unchanged since installation  -e : Uninstalls a package 25

rpm examples  rpm -qa -> lists all the installed packages  rpm -qc {pname} -> list configuartion file names for given package  rpm -qi {pnane} -> Give details of package  rpm -ql {pname} -> lists the files in a package  rpm -qR {pname} -> Lists package dependencies  rpm -qf filename -> List the package name of given file  rpm -qpl {pname} -> lists all the files in a package  rpm -qp {pname} -> list the package with given pname(*/?)  rpm -Va -> Verify all the installed packages  rpm -V {pname} -> Verify specify package  rpm -V -f {filename} {packagename} -> Verify a specified file in a package 26

rpm continued…  extracting data from rpms – rpm2cpio $ rpm2cpio XXXsrc.rpm > xxx.cpio $cpio –i –make-directories < xxx.cpio $rpm2cpio xxxsrc.rpm | cpio –i –make-directories 27

dpkg  dpkg –i xxx.deb  dpkg –r xxx.deb  apt-get install xxx

dpkg  dselect utility – menu driven  aptitude install/update/remove  /etc/dpkg/dpkg.cfg and ~/.dpkg.cfg,  /etc/apt/apt.conf(controls dselect and apt)

Yum  /etc/yum.repos.d  /etc/yum.conf  Yum client  Redhat 5: yum  Sles10 : zypper  Sles11 : rug  Yum installation  Setting the yum repo  install, upgrade, uninstall Try this: http://linux.dell.com/repo/hardware/

alien  Covert packages from one format to another Formats are: Linux standard base RPM deb stampede(.slp) Solaris(.pkg) Slackware(.tgz) # alien --to-rpm --scripts ./mypkg.deb

Library management  /etc/ld.so.conf  /etc/ld.so.conf.d/*.conf  Temporarily changing the library path  LD_LIBRARY_PATH  $ export LD_LIBRARY_PATH=/usr/local/testlib:/opt/newlib ldd Displaying shared library dependencies :  ldd /bin/cat

Understanding the kernel  uname –n -> hostname  uname –s -> kernel name  uname –v -> kernel version  uname –r -> kernel release  uname –m -> machine option  uname –p -> Processor  uname –o -> Operating system  uname –i -> Hardware platform  uname –a -> all information

Process – ps output meaning(columns)  Username  Process ID  Parent Process ID  TTY – identifying terminal  Cpu time  Cpu priority  memory use  Command

Other Process related commands  Dynamic variant of process – top  nice : Run a program with modified scheduling priority. Priority ranges from -20(most favorable) to +19(least favorable)  renice : alter priority of running processes  kill  nohup  killall

4. Hardware configuration– modprobe, lspci, lsmod, insmod, rmmod 36 Confidential

Hardware  BIOS – resides on the motherboard in ROM – EEPROM/Flash memory When computer is turned on- BIOS performs POST and initializes hardware and then load boot loader  IRQ - An interrupt request (IRQ), or interrupt, is a signal sent to the CPU instructing it to suspend its current activity and to handle some external event such as keyboard input. /proc/interrupts  I/O addresses (also referred to as I/O ports) are unique locations in memory that are reserved for communications between the CPU and specific physical hardware devices. Like IRQs, These are commonly associated with specific devices and should not ordinarily be shared.  DMA Addresses - Direct memory addressing (DMA) is an alternative method of communication to I/O ports. Rather than have the CPU mediate the transfer of data between a device and memory, DMA permits the device to transfer data directly, without the CPU’s attention. The result can be lower CPU requirements for I/O activity, which can improve overall system performance. /proc/dma

Common Linux Devices • Linux Device Windows Name Typical IRQ I/O Address • /dev/ttyS0 COM1 4 0x03f8 • /dev/ttyS1 COM2 3 0x02f8 • /dev/ttyS2 COM3 4 0x03e8 • /dev/ttyS3 COM4 3 0x02e8 • /dev/lp0 LPT1 7 0x0378-0x037f • /dev/lp1 LPT2 5 0x0278-0x027f • /dev/fd0 A: 6 0x03f0-0x03f7 • /dev/fd1 B: 6 0x0370-0x0377

Coldplug and Hotplug devices  Colplug devices – Components internal to the computer such as memory, CPU, pci cards etc. resides on the motherboard in ROM – EEPROM/Flash memory  Hotplug devices – Devices which can be added/removed when the system is in running state.

Configuring expansion cards  lspci  setpci • /usr/share/misc/pci.ids

Learning about kernel modules  lsmod  insmod  modprobe  rmmod  modinfo

Configuring USB devices  USB basics  USB 1.0 and USB 1.1 : 12Mbps  USB 2.0 : 48Mbps  USB 3.0 : 3.2 Gbps  USB devices: Scanner, printer, mice, digital camera, keyboard, speakers etc.  lsusb  /proc/bus/usb  usbmgr  /etc/usbmgr/usbmgr.conf

Systems Run Levels  0: Halt  1: single User mode  2: Multi user mode without NFS  3: Full multi user mode  4: unused  5: X11  6: reboot

Filesystems  fdisk  mkfs –t ext3 /dev/sda2  mkswap /dev/hda2  swapon /dev/hda2  fsck  /etc/fstab  df  du

5. Managing Files – mkdir, cp, rm, grep, find 45 Confidential

File types  Regular file  Directory file  Special file  Character  Block Links  Soft link  Hard link Sockets Named pipes

Managing Links  ln [options] source link  Hard link: ln mainfile hlinkfile  Soft link: ln –s mainfile slinkfile

Inode table  Owner of the file  Group of the file  File type  File access permission  Date and time of last access  Date and time of last modification  Number of links to the file  Size of the file  Addresses of blocks where the file is physically present

Surrogate super block and Inode table  Super block – state of the file system  Size  No of files it can accommodate  How many mores can be created  sync

How to check file inode no  ls –i filename

File Commands  ls  cp  mv  rm  touch : Last file modification time/inode change time/access time  ln  chmod  chown  mkdir  rmdir  umask

File Commands contd…  cut  paste  join  split  expand  unexpand  uniq  sort  head  tail  wc  tr  nl

File Archiving Commands  tar  cpio  gzip  Gunzip  bzip2

Managing file ownership  Changing file ownership: chown  Chown [options] [newowner][:newgroup] filename  Changing file group ownership  chgrp [options] [newgroup] filename

File Access  Changing file permission: chmod $ ls -l test -rwxr-xr-x 1 rodsmith users 111 Apr 13 13:48 test – ‚-‛ -> file – d -> firectory – l -> symbolic link – p -> Named pipe – s -> Socket – b -> Block device – c -> Character device SUID SGID Sticky bit

Setting the default mode and group  Default permissions are configurable and defined by user mask.(umask) • Umask Created Files Created Directories • 000 666 (rw-rw-rw-) 777 (rwxrwxrwx) • 002 664 (rw-rw-r--) 775 (rwxrwxr-x) • 022 644 (rw-r--r--) 755 (rwxr-xr-x) • 027 640 (rw-r-----) 750 (rwxr-x---) • 077 600 (rw-------) 700 (rwx------) • 277 400 (r--------) 500 (r-x------)

Managing Disk Quotas  Enabling Quota Support  Kernel 2.4.x – quota v1 support  Kernel 2.6.x – quota v2 support  /etc/fstab /dev/hdc5 /home ext3 usrquota,grpquota 1 1  chkconfig quota on  Setting quota for users, edquota raghu

Locating Files  whereis  which  locate  find  type  Updatedb  /etc/updatedb.conf

Regular Expressions  Bracket Expressions: d[aeiou]g => dag, deg, dig, dog, dug  Range Expression : a[1-5] => a1, a2, a3, a4, a5  Any single character except new line: .  Start and end of line: ^ and $  Repetition operators: * -> 0 and more), + -> 1 and more, ? -> 0 and 1  Any single character except new line: .  Multiple possible strings: Linux | Windows  Escaping: backslash 59

grep  grep [options] regexp [files]  grep openmanage /var/log/messages  grep –i openmanage /var/log/messages  grep –r –i openmanage /var/log  grep –r –i error /var/log 60

Sed(stream editor)  Modifies the contents of files • sed [options] -f script-file [input-file] • sed [options] script-text [input-file]  $ sed ‘s/2009/2010/’ cal-2009.txt > cal-2010.txt 61

awk  Print list of all processes of all the users  ps -ef | awk '{print $1"=>" $8}‘  Print all the child process of PPID 1.  ps -ef | grep -w 1 | grep -v /1 | awk '{print $2"=>"$3"=>"$8}‘  Display and create all the loaded module details in a file  62 lsmod | awk '{print $1}'| xargs modinfo | tee mod.txt

File Systems  Ext2/3: Native file system  Reiserfs : Suitable for small files – less than 1K  Vfat : 32bit file system compatible with win  XFS : Journaling file systems –handle large files  JFS : Handles power down and crashes  Swap: virtual memory  Iso9660 : cdfs, dvd 63

64

6. Administering the system – useradd, usermod, shutdown, crontab, chown 65 Confidential

Booting Linux and editing files 66 Confidential

Boot Loaders  BIOS->MBR->Boot loader->OS kernel  LILO  GRUB  Boot messages:  /var/log/messages  Command dmesg

LILO – Linux Loader  Configuration file: /etc/lilo.conf  Boot loader location: boot=/dev/hda  Default: default os to boot  Boot Prompt  Boot Timeout  Linux root partition, root=/dev/hda4  Boot in read-only mode  Linux boot image: image=/kernelimage  RAM disk: initrd=oskernel imahe  Extra kernel option: mem=2048  Lilo –c – testing purpose  Lilo –v – output in verpose

LILO prompt  Boot: linux 1 -> To boot in single user mode 1/S/s/single can be typed  If suppose init program is corrupted  Boot: linux init=/bin/sh can be used

GRUB  Configuration file: /boot/grub/menu.lst (some read/fedora used grub.conf)

LILO and GRUB LILO /dev/hda (hd0,0) /dev/hdb (hd1) /etc/lilo.conf /boot/grub/menu.lst lilo /etc/lilo.conf Confidential (hd0) /dev/hda1 71 GRUB grub-install /dev/hda

Linux Boot Process • System Power on-> CPU executes BIOS code->BIOS(Post, check and configure hardware)->Boot loader kicks off->OS kernel is loaded(initialize devices, mount boot partition, init program starts>init selects run level from /etc/inittab and default level run level loads Inittab entry • id:runlevels:action:process # Default runlevel. The runlevels used by RHS are: # 0 - halt (Do NOT set initdefault to this) # 1 - Single user mode # 2 - Multiuser, without NFS (The same as 3, if you do not have networking) # 3 - Full multiuser mode # 4 - unused # 5 - X11 # 6 - reboot (Do NOT set initdefault to this)

Linux Boot Process contd..  inittab file  id:3:initdefault:  5:2345:respawn:/sbin/mingetty tty5  chkconfig : updates and queries run level information for system services.  runlevel : Find the current and previous run level  init : parent of all the processes  telinit: tell init to switch to specified runlevel  shutdown

Life cycle of a process  fork and exec  init – process id 1  getty  login  sh  Who or grep or any command running on shell  kill

Linux installation and designing hard disk layout  / : default root partition  /var : logs related entries  /home: User home directory  /opt: Optional packages  Swap space: typically double of RAM

Managing Users  useradd  usermod  userdel  groupadd  groupmod  gpasswd  Chage: change user password expiry information

usermod  Usermod –l [newlogin] [login]  Usermod –c [comment login]  Usermod –f [no of days] [login] => no of days password to expire  Usermod –L [login] -> lock the password and suspend the user  Usermod –U [login] -> unlock the password  Usermod –e [yyyy-mm-dd] [login] -> change the expiration date

Tuning User and System Environments  Global Configuration file  /etc/profile  /etc/bash.bashrc  User Configuration file  ~/.profile  ~/.bashrc  Configuartion file for added user’s fefault environment setting  /etc/skel  Kernel Parameter  /etc/sysctl.conf  sysctl

Automate system administration tasks by scheduling jobs  Manage cron and at jobs  Configure user access to cron and at services  The following is a partial list of the used files, terms, and utilities:  /etc/cron.{d,daily,hourly,monthly,weekly}  /etc/crontab  crontab –e

Cronjob Definition * * * * * Command Day of week(1-7) Month(1-12) Day of month(0-31) Hour(0-23) Minute(0-59) 80

System logging  Syslog configuration files: /etc/syslog.conf  /etc/sysconfig/syslog  /var/log  /var/log/messages  dmesg  last  Binary names:  syslogd  klogd

Systems Monitoring  Process  ps  top  Disk space  df  du  Bandwidth  tcpdump  netstat  Memory  pmap  ps  free  other commands  lsof

Systems Monitoring contd…  uptime: Load average is average no of processes waiting to run in 1min, 5min, and 15 mins. Ideally it should be <1.  tload is graphical presentation of uptime.  vmstat-Virtual memory usage  pmap -x pid: mapping of processes with memory resources  scsiinfo  hdparam

Perform security administration tasks  Audit system to find files with the suid/sgid bit set.  Set or change user passwords and password aging information.  Discovering open ports on a system: nmap, netstat  Setting up limits on user logins, processes and memory usage  ulimit  Basic sudo configuration and usage  /etc/sudoers

Linux Kernel  Module components in source tree: /usr/src/linux  Module components at runtime: /lib/modules/<kernelversion>/kernel.  Download latest stable kernel from www.kernel.org  Unpack the kernel  Compiling a kernel:  make config/menuconifg/xconfig  make dep  make bzImage  make modules  make modules_install  make install  Installing the kernel image using boot loader: /boot/grub/grub.conf  Reboot the system and new kernel should be up

Shell Scripting  Variables – strings, numbers, environment and paramter  Conditions: shell booleans  Control Structures: if, elif, for, while, until, case  Lists  Functions  Commands built into shell  Getting the result of a command  Here documents

Quoting  Declaration  svar = ‚Hello world‛  $svar  ‚$svar‛  ‘$svar’  $svar

Environment Variables  $HOME  $PATH  $PS1  $PS2  $0  $#  $$  $1, $2, $3…  $*  $@

Control Structures  If if condition then Statements else Statements fi  elif if condition then Statements elif then statements else Statements fi

Control Structures contd..  for for variable in values do statements done  while while condition do statements done  until until condition do statements done

Control Structures contd..  Case Case variable in pattern1 statements;; pattern2 statements;; pattern3 statements;; esac

Debugging scripts  sh –n <script>  sh –v <script>  sh –x <script>

GUI Based Monitoring tools  Nagios  Cacti  Zabbix  MRTG  Nfsen

7. Networking 94 Confidential

Basic Network Configuration Manually and automatically configure network interfaces Basic TCP/IP host configuration The following is a partial list of the used files, terms, and utilities:  /etc/hostname  /etc/hosts  /etc/resolv.conf  /etc/nsswitch.conf  ifconfig

Configuring Network  /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts/ifcfg-eth0  A Sample Network Configuration File  DEVICE=eth0  BOOTPROTO=static  IPADDR=192.168.29.39  NETMASK=255.255.255.0  NETWORK=192.168.29.0  BROADCAST=192.168.29.255  GATEWAY=192.168.29.1  ONBOOT=yes  # ifconfig eth0 up 192.168.29.39 netmask 255.255.255.0  # route add default gw 192.168.29.1  ifconfig eth0  DNS Entry: /etc/resolv.conf

Configuring routing  # route add -net 172.20.0.0 netmask 255.255.0.0 gw 172.21.1.1  ifup eth0  ifdown eth0  ethtool

Network Port numbers • Port Number TCP or UDP Purpose Example Linux Servers  20 TCP File Transfer Protocol ProFTPd, vsftpd  21 TCP FTP ProFTPd, vsftpd  22 TCP Secure Shell (SSH) OpenSSH, Dropbear  23 TCP Telnet in.telnetd  25 Postfix, TCP Simple Mail Transfer Protocol (SMTP)Sendmail,  53 TCP and UDP Domain Name System (DNS) BIND;

Diagnosing Network connections  ping  traceroute  netstat  nslookup  dig  Examining raw network traffic – tcpdump – wireshark

Various tools  telnet  ftp  ssh  scp  ping

Linux Server  Web Server – Apache  Database Server – mysql, oracle  ftp server – proftp, vsftp  File server - samba  Mail server – sendmail, postfix

Linux Firewall  #iptables -t filter -A INPUT -p tcp --dport 22 -j DROP #iptables -t filter -A INPUT -p udp --dport 22 -j DROP #iptables -t filter -A INPUT -p tcp --dport 23 -j DROP #iptables -t filter -A INPUT -p udp --dport 23 -j DROP #iptables -t filter -P OUPUT DROP #iptables -t filter -A OUTPUT -p tcp --dport 80 -j ACCEPT #iptables -t filter -A OUTPUT -p udp --dport 80 -j ACCEPT #iptables -t filter -A OUTPUT -p tcp --dport 53 -j ACCEPT #iptables -t filter -A OUTPUT -p udp --dport 53 -j ACCEPT # service iptables save #service iptables restart

Exercise  How long the server is running and no of users who are using the system.  Create a user with your name, create a group name training, validity period, home directory, assign training group  Search for files with specific pattern  Display line no 10 to line no 20 , from a file having 30 lines.  print file in reverse

References  www.tldp.org  www.kernel.org  www.linux.org

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Linux ist genau wie Microsoft Windows ein Betriebssystem, jedoch ist Linux in vielen Distributionen kostenfrei (jedoch ohne Support) erhältlich.
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This free introductory linux course is the first in a 3 part series to linux certification. Upon completion this linux course gives you the basic linux ...
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Enroll for Linux Certification training classes online.Be a Linux Expert! 16 Hrs Learning 32 Hrs Projects Life Time Access 24 X 7 Support Job ...
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