Landmarks on the Oregon Trail part 2

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Information about Landmarks on the Oregon Trail part 2
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Published on July 7, 2009

Author: History2093

Source: authorstream.com

Slide 1: A Visual Tour of Sites and Landmarks on the Oregon Trail Part 2 Slide 2: Part 2 begins at Ft. Bridger - here Slide 3: Mr. (or Mrs.?) Willard made sure they left their mark – signed at Register Cliff and Independence Rock! Notice the ‘Yankee’ cheering on “Old Abe”! William Henry Jackson sketch of wagon train at Independence Rock. Travelers tried to get there by July 4 so they could Oregon before winter set in. Independence Rock, Wyo. Abigail Jane Scott: June 29, 1852 - We came twenty miles. We struck the Sweet water about two o'clock and about three came to Independence rock; The Sweet water is about one hundred feet in width; The water is clear and palatable but is warmer during the day than water of the Platte. Independence rock is an immense mass covering an area of, I think about ten acres, and is about three hundred feet high; My sisters and I went to the base of the rock with the intention of climbing it but a we had only ascended about thirty feet when a heavy hail and wind storm arose obliging us to desist; Fort Bridger, Wyo. : Fort Bridger, Wyo. Fur trader’s fort, built by Jim Bridger in 1843; he sold under pressure to the Mormons in 1855. From 1857 to 1866 the fort was operated by as a private business, then was turned over to the US Army as a frontier garrison protecting overland travelers, the railroad and telegraph (after 1869), and miners. Today’s reconstruction of Fort Bridger showing the old fur fort (above) and the 1870s military complex (right). Slide 5: Soda Springs, Idaho (left). On July 24, 1838, Sarah White Smith, "Traveled . . . along the bank of the bear river & are encamped at Soda Springs. This is indeed a curiosity. The water tastes like soda water, especially artificially prepared. The water is bubbling and foaming like boiling water. I drank of it. . . . We find it excellent for baking bread, no preparation of water is necessary. Take it from the fountain & the bread is as light as any prepared with yeast." Fort Hall (sketch from 1849 and today’s replica below) was a private American fur trade post from 1834 to 1837, when the British Hudson’s Bay Company bought it. It remained a British supply post until 1846 when ownership of the Oregon Country was settled in favor of the US. Painting by Williams Henry Jackson, undated : Painting by Williams Henry Jackson, undated Three Island Crossing on the Snake River in central Idaho. "Husband had considerable difficulty crossing the cart. Both the cart and the mules were capsized in the water and the mules entangled in the harness. They would have drowned, but for a desperate struggle to get them ashore. Then after putting two of the strongest horses before the cart and two men swimming behind to steady it, they succeeded in getting it over.“ – Narcissa Whitman Reaching Flagstaff Hill in today’s eastern Oregon meant their long-awaited destination was only a couple more weeks away! : Reaching Flagstaff Hill in today’s eastern Oregon meant their long-awaited destination was only a couple more weeks away! Whitman Mission, established 1836 by Marcus and Narcissa Whitman to convert Cayuse Indians; but, their main focus became one of assistance to overland travelers and caring for orphaned children. Photos - top: William Henry Jackson’s painting of the mission about 1840s; bottom: Whitman Mission National Historic Site (WA) today; bottom right: female park ranger portraying pioneer woman. : Whitman Mission, established 1836 by Marcus and Narcissa Whitman to convert Cayuse Indians; but, their main focus became one of assistance to overland travelers and caring for orphaned children. Photos - top: William Henry Jackson’s painting of the mission about 1840s; bottom: Whitman Mission National Historic Site (WA) today; bottom right: female park ranger portraying pioneer woman. Final stop: Fort Vancouver, British until 1846, north shore Columbia River, then down to Willamette Valley to begin their new life! : Final stop: Fort Vancouver, British until 1846, north shore Columbia River, then down to Willamette Valley to begin their new life! Ft. Vancouver, 1848 Willamette Valley today In 1846, upon arriving at the Valley, Henry Garrison wrote, "Our journey is ended, our toils are over, but I have not tried to portray the terrible conditions we were placed in. No tongue can tell, nor pen describe the heart rending scenes through which we passed."

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