advertisement

Knowledge Packet New

67 %
33 %
advertisement
Information about Knowledge Packet New
Entertainment

Published on February 4, 2008

Author: Virginia

Source: authorstream.com

advertisement

Slide1:  NAVAL RESERVE OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS SAN DIEGO, CA ORIENTATION 2006 KNOWLEDGE HANDBOOK NAVAL RESERVE OFFICERS TRAINING CORPS SAN DIEGO, CA ORIENTATION 2006 KNOWLEDGE HANDBOOK Slide2:  “A leader is someone you would follow to a place you wouldn’t go alone.” - Maj. Gen. Thomas Wilkerson, USMC “A leader is someone you would follow to a place you wouldn’t go alone.” - Maj. Gen. Thomas Wilkerson, USMC Slide3:  Battalion Mission Statement: To develop Midshipmen mentally, morally and physically with the highest ideals of duty, honor and loyalty in order to commission college graduates as officers who possess a basic professional background, are motivated toward careers in the Naval Service and have potential for future developments in mind and character and assume the highest responsibilities of command, citizenship and government. To this end, the NROTC program provides: An understanding of the fundamental concepts and principles of Naval Science. A basic understanding of associated professional knowledge. An appreciation of the requirement for national security. A strong sense of personal integrity, honor and individual responsibility. An educational background which will allow NROTC Midshipmen to undertake successfully, in later periods of their careers, advanced or continuing education in a field or application in the interest of maintaining Seapower. An opportunity for students to gain appointment as Ensigns in the U.S. Navy or Second Lieutenants in the U.S. Marine Corps. A means to impart knowledge of the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps, ideals, and achievements, thereby gaining and holding increased public interest in maintaining Seapower. Battalion Mission Statement: To develop Midshipmen mentally, morally and physically with the highest ideals of duty, honor and loyalty in order to commission college graduates as officers who possess a basic professional background, are motivated toward careers in the Naval Service and have potential for future developments in mind and character and assume the highest responsibilities of command, citizenship and government. To this end, the NROTC program provides: An understanding of the fundamental concepts and principles of Naval Science. A basic understanding of associated professional knowledge. An appreciation of the requirement for national security. A strong sense of personal integrity, honor and individual responsibility. An educational background which will allow NROTC Midshipmen to undertake successfully, in later periods of their careers, advanced or continuing education in a field or application in the interest of maintaining Seapower. An opportunity for students to gain appointment as Ensigns in the U.S. Navy or Second Lieutenants in the U.S. Marine Corps. A means to impart knowledge of the U.S. Navy and Marine Corps, ideals, and achievements, thereby gaining and holding increased public interest in maintaining Seapower. Slide4:  Core Values: 1. Honor 2. Courage 3. Commitment Midshipman Honor Code: For the NROTC Midshipman, those obligations are stated in the following code: “Each member of the USD/SDSU NROTC Unit will strive for excellence in all endeavors, be responsible for his/her every action and uphold the Naval Service Core Values of honor, courage and commitment.” Military Courtesy: 1. Military courtesy is shown to all; it is shown to juniors as well as seniors. It is shown within all grades and on all occasions. Courtesy shown to a senior indicates respect for authority and responsibility; that shown to a junior is an expression of appreciation and respect for the essential part he/she plays as a member of the same service. 2. The most well-known of all military courtesies is the salute. It is the most obvious, the most used and has long been a form of greeting. Military courtesy requires the juniors to salute first. However, this is not an acknowledgement of inferiority; for the senior in returning the gesture is saluting the junior. For this reason, saluting is not a one-sided act and should always be considered a mutual exchange of greeting between two military personnel. Core Values: 1. Honor 2. Courage 3. Commitment Midshipman Honor Code: For the NROTC Midshipman, those obligations are stated in the following code: “Each member of the USD/SDSU NROTC Unit will strive for excellence in all endeavors, be responsible for his/her every action and uphold the Naval Service Core Values of honor, courage and commitment.” Military Courtesy: 1. Military courtesy is shown to all; it is shown to juniors as well as seniors. It is shown within all grades and on all occasions. Courtesy shown to a senior indicates respect for authority and responsibility; that shown to a junior is an expression of appreciation and respect for the essential part he/she plays as a member of the same service. 2. The most well-known of all military courtesies is the salute. It is the most obvious, the most used and has long been a form of greeting. Military courtesy requires the juniors to salute first. However, this is not an acknowledgement of inferiority; for the senior in returning the gesture is saluting the junior. For this reason, saluting is not a one-sided act and should always be considered a mutual exchange of greeting between two military personnel. Slide5:  3. The salute is rendered willingly, promptly and cheerfully and it must be executed smartly and correctly. The manner and spirit of executing the salute are outward indications of military training and an indication of morale of the individual as well as the unit he/she serves. Nothing so characterizes good Sailors and Marines as correct saluting habits. A smart, correctly executed salute should become as much a part of the individual as his/her uniform. Purpose of the Interior Guard: Preserve Order Enforce Regulations Protect Property 11 Leadership Principles: 1. Know yourself and seek self improvement. 2. Be technically and tactically proficient. 3. Seek responsibility and take responsibility for your actions. 4. Make sound and timely decisions. 5. Set the example. 6. Know your troops and look out for their welfare. 7. Keep your troops informed. 8. Develop a sense of responsibility in your subordinates. 9. Insure the task is understood, supervised, and accomplished. 10. Train your troops as a team. 11. Employ your command in accordance with its capabilities. 3. The salute is rendered willingly, promptly and cheerfully and it must be executed smartly and correctly. The manner and spirit of executing the salute are outward indications of military training and an indication of morale of the individual as well as the unit he/she serves. Nothing so characterizes good Sailors and Marines as correct saluting habits. A smart, correctly executed salute should become as much a part of the individual as his/her uniform. Purpose of the Interior Guard: Preserve Order Enforce Regulations Protect Property 11 Leadership Principles: 1. Know yourself and seek self improvement. 2. Be technically and tactically proficient. 3. Seek responsibility and take responsibility for your actions. 4. Make sound and timely decisions. 5. Set the example. 6. Know your troops and look out for their welfare. 7. Keep your troops informed. 8. Develop a sense of responsibility in your subordinates. 9. Insure the task is understood, supervised, and accomplished. 10. Train your troops as a team. 11. Employ your command in accordance with its capabilities. Slide6:  The 11 General Orders of the Sentry: To take charge of this post and all government property in view. To walk my post in a military manner, keeping always on the alert, and observing everything that takes place within sight or hearing. To report all violations of orders I am instructed to enforce. To repeat all calls from posts more distant from the guard house than my own. To quit my post only when properly relieved. To receive, obey, and pass on to the sentry who relieves me, all orders from the commanding officer, officer of the day, and officers and non commissioned officers of the guard only. To talk to no one except in the line of duty. To give the alarm in case of fire or disorder. To call the petty officer of the watch/corporal of the guard in any case not covered by instructions. To salute all officers and all colors and all standards not cased. To be especially watchful at night, and during the time for challenging, to challenge all persons on or near my post and to allow no one to pass without proper authority. The 11 General Orders of the Sentry: To take charge of this post and all government property in view. To walk my post in a military manner, keeping always on the alert, and observing everything that takes place within sight or hearing. To report all violations of orders I am instructed to enforce. To repeat all calls from posts more distant from the guard house than my own. To quit my post only when properly relieved. To receive, obey, and pass on to the sentry who relieves me, all orders from the commanding officer, officer of the day, and officers and non commissioned officers of the guard only. To talk to no one except in the line of duty. To give the alarm in case of fire or disorder. To call the petty officer of the watch/corporal of the guard in any case not covered by instructions. To salute all officers and all colors and all standards not cased. To be especially watchful at night, and during the time for challenging, to challenge all persons on or near my post and to allow no one to pass without proper authority. Slide7:  14 Leadership Traits: (JJ DID TIE BUCKLE) Judgment Justice Decisiveness Initiative Dependability Tact Integrity Endurance Bearing Unselfishness Courage: Moral & Physical Knowledge Loyalty Enthusiasm 14 Leadership Traits: (JJ DID TIE BUCKLE) Judgment Justice Decisiveness Initiative Dependability Tact Integrity Endurance Bearing Unselfishness Courage: Moral & Physical Knowledge Loyalty Enthusiasm Slide8:  Unit/Battalion/Orientation Chain of Command: Commander in Chief ___Honorable Mr. Bush___ Secretary of Defense _Honorable Mr. Rumsfeld_ Secretary of the Navy __Honorable Mr. Winter__ Chairman of the JCS ____Gen Pace (USMC)__ Chief of Naval Operations ______ADM Mullen______ Commandant of the USMC ______Gen Hagee______ NETC ______VADM Moran____ MCPO of the Navy ______MCPO Scott_____ Sgt Maj of the USMC _____SgtMaj Estrada____ USD/SDSU NROTC CO _____CAPT Turley______ USD/SDSU NROTC XO ______CDR Pittner______ USD/SDSU NROTC MOI _____Capt Shelley______ USD/SDSU NROTC AMOI ____GySgt Magcale_____ Battalion CO ____MIDN 1/C Kondrat___ Battalion XO _MIDN 1/C Kronschnabel_ Battalion Sgt Maj ______OC Saewart______ Orientation CO __MIDN 1/C R. Chiriboga_ Orientation XO ____MIDN 1/C Cappalo___ Orientation 1st Sgt ____MIDN 1/C O’Shea___ Orientation Supply Officer ___MIDN 1/C Boersma___ Orientation Ops Officer __MIDN 1/C Hohnemann__ Platoon Commander ______________________ Platoon Sergeant ______________________ Unit/Battalion/Orientation Chain of Command: Commander in Chief ___Honorable Mr. Bush___ Secretary of Defense _Honorable Mr. Rumsfeld_ Secretary of the Navy __Honorable Mr. Winter__ Chairman of the JCS ____Gen Pace (USMC)__ Chief of Naval Operations ______ADM Mullen______ Commandant of the USMC ______Gen Hagee______ NETC ______VADM Moran____ MCPO of the Navy ______MCPO Scott_____ Sgt Maj of the USMC _____SgtMaj Estrada____ USD/SDSU NROTC CO ______CAPT Turley_____ USD/SDSU NROTC XO ______CDR Pittner______ USD/SDSU NROTC MOI _____Capt Shelley______ USD/SDSU NROTC AMOI ____GySgt Magcale_____ Battalion CO ____MIDN 1/C Kondrat___ Battalion XO _MIDN 1/C Kronschnabel_ Battalion Sgt Maj ______OC Saewart______ Orientation CO __MIDN 1/C R. Chiriboga_ Orientation XO ____MIDN 1/C Cappalo___ Orientation 1st Sgt ____MIDN 1/C O’Shea___ Orientation Supply Officer ___MIDN 1/C Boersma___ Orientation Ops Officer __MIDN 1/C Hohnemann__ Platoon Commander ______________________ Platoon Sergeant ______________________ Slide9:  Missions of the Navy: To conduct prompt and sustained combat operations at sea. To seek out and destroy enemy naval forces and to suppress enemy sea commerce. To gain and maintain general naval supremacy, to control vital sea areas and protect vital sea lines of communication. To establish and maintain local superiority (including air) in an area of naval operations. To seize and defend advanced naval bases. To conduct such land and air operations as may be essential to the prosecution of a naval campaign. Functions of the Navy: Sea Control Power Projection Roles of the Navy: Strategic Defense Deploy Naval Forces Security of Sea Lines of Communication Birthday of the Navy: 13 October 1775 Missions of the Navy: To conduct prompt and sustained combat operations at sea. To seek out and destroy enemy naval forces and to suppress enemy sea commerce. To gain and maintain general naval supremacy, to control vital sea areas and protect vital sea lines of communication. To establish and maintain local superiority (including air) in an area of naval operations. To seize and defend advanced naval bases. To conduct such land and air operations as may be essential to the prosecution of a naval campaign. Functions of the Navy: Sea Control Power Projection Roles of the Navy: Strategic Defense Deploy Naval Forces Security of Sea Lines of Communication Birthday of the Navy: 13 October 1775 Slide10:  Famous Naval Officers: John Paul Jones – “Father of the United States Navy.” Famous for saying: “Don’t give up the ship,” “I have not yet begun to fight,” and "We have met the enemy and they are ours.” David Farragut – First Admiral in the U.S. Navy. Quoted as saying "Damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead!" during the Battle of New Orleans. VADM Stockdale – Senior Naval POW during the Vietnam War and Medal of Honor recipient. ADM Rickover – “Father of the Nuclear Navy” ADM Nimitz – First Fleet Admiral in the U.S. Navy Famous Battles of the Navy: Pearl Harbor – Surprise attack by the Japanese on 07Dec1941on the Naval base at Pearl harbor, precipitating U.S. involvement in World War II. During the attack, two U.S. ships were sunk: the USS Arizona and the USS Oklahoma. Battle of Midway – The U.S. Navy defeated a Japanese attack against Midway Atoll and destroyed four Japanese aircraft carriers in the process. By putting an end to early-war Japanese expansion, permanently damaging Japan's elite carrier force, and allowing the U.S. Navy to seize the strategic initiative, it represented the turning point in the Pacific War, and is widely seen as the most important naval battle of the war. Gulf of Tonkin Incident – Naval engagement that led to a dramatic increase of U.S. involvement in the Vietnam conflict. Famous Naval Officers: John Paul Jones – “Father of the United States Navy.” Famous for saying: “Don’t give up the ship,” “I have not yet begun to fight,” and "We have met the enemy and they are ours.” David Farragut – First Admiral in the U.S. Navy. Quoted as saying "Damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead!" during the Battle of New Orleans. VADM Stockdale – Senior Naval POW during the Vietnam War and Medal of Honor recipient. ADM Rickover – “Father of the Nuclear Navy” ADM Nimitz – First Fleet Admiral in the U.S. Navy Famous Battles of the Navy: Pearl Harbor – Surprise attack by the Japanese on 07Dec1941on the Naval base at Pearl harbor, precipitating U.S. involvement in World War II. During the attack, two U.S. ships were sunk: the USS Arizona and the USS Oklahoma. Battle of Midway – The U.S. Navy defeated a Japanese attack against Midway Atoll and destroyed four Japanese aircraft carriers in the process. By putting an end to early-war Japanese expansion, permanently damaging Japan's elite carrier force, and allowing the U.S. Navy to seize the strategic initiative, it represented the turning point in the Pacific War, and is widely seen as the most important naval battle of the war. Gulf of Tonkin Incident – Naval engagement that led to a dramatic increase of U.S. involvement in the Vietnam conflict. Slide11:  Anchors A' weigh: Anchors A' weigh, my boy, anchors a' weigh Farewell to all our joys We sail at the break of day-ay-ay-ay To our last night ashore Drink to the foam Until we meet again Here’s wishing you a happy voyage home! The Sailor's Creed: I am a United States Sailor. I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States of America and I will obey the orders of those appointed over me. I represent the fighting spirit of the Navy and those who have gone before me to defend freedom and democracy around the world. I proudly serve my country's Navy combat team with Honor, Courage, and Commitment. I am committed to excellence and the fair treatment of all. Anchors A' weigh: Anchors A' weigh, my boy, anchors a' weigh Farewell to all our joys We sail at the break of day-ay-ay-ay To our last night ashore Drink to the foam Until we meet again Here’s wishing you a happy voyage home! The Sailor's Creed: I am a United States Sailor. I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States of America and I will obey the orders of those appointed over me. I represent the fighting spirit of the Navy and those who have gone before me to defend freedom and democracy around the world. I proudly serve my country's Navy combat team with Honor, Courage, and Commitment. I am committed to excellence and the fair treatment of all. Slide12:  Missions of the Marine Corps: (As set forth in the National Security Act of 1947) Seize and defend advanced naval bases. Conduct land operations incident to naval campaigns. Be primarily responsible for the development of amphibious warfare doctrine, tactics, techniques and equipment. Provide security for naval shore stations. Provide ships’ detachment. Perform other such duties as the President may direct. Primary Role of the Marine Corps for Defense: To be the primary response force for immediate deployment: “THE READINESS FORCE” Birthday of the Marine Corps: 10 November 1775 Objectives of Marine Corps Leadership: Mission Accomplishment Troop Welfare Missions of the Marine Corps: (As set forth in the National Security Act of 1947) Seize and defend advanced naval bases. Conduct land operations incident to naval campaigns. Be primarily responsible for the development of amphibious warfare doctrine, tactics, techniques and equipment. Provide security for naval shore stations. Provide ships’ detachment. Perform other such duties as the President may direct. Primary Role of the Marine Corps for Defense: To be the primary response force for immediate deployment: “THE READINESS FORCE” Birthday of the Marine Corps: 10 November 1775 Objectives of Marine Corps Leadership: Mission Accomplishment Troop Welfare Slide13:  Famous Battles of the Marine Corps: TRIPOLI – In 1805, America assembled an expeditionary force of Marines to subdue the Barbary Coast pirates who were raiding American merchant ships in the Mediterranean. Lieutenant Presley O’Bannon and his Marines marched across 600 miles of North Africa’s Libyan Desert to successfully storm the fortified Tripolitanian city of Derna. The first verse of the Marines’ Hymn recalls the battle, which lives in Marine tradition: “From the Halls of Montezuma to the shores of Tripoli.” BELLEAU WOOD – America entered World War I in 1918 to reinforce the battered French and British troops waging a desperate fight against Germany. A division of Marines was sent to Belleau Wood to support the French army. As the Marines arrived, the French troops were retreating. When a French officer suggested that the Marines join the retreat, Captain Lloyd Williams responded, “Retreat, hell! We just got here.” IWO JIMA – On February 19, 1945, America sent the United States Marines to seize the island of Iwo Jima. Japanese soldiers defneding the island had converted it into a deadly maze of defensive fortifications, tunnels and overlapping fields of machine gun fire. The battle for the island raged for a month. According to the Marine Lt. Gen, H. M. Smith, it was “the toughest and hardest fight in Marine Corps history.” During the battle, a group of Marines raised the American flag at the summit of Mount Suribachi, the highest point on the island. The legendary photograph of the flag raising has become a Marine icon, symbolizing the fighting spirit and the unflagging dedication of the United States Marines. Over a quarter of the Medals of Honor awarded to marines in World War II were given for conduct in the invasion of Iwo Jima — 27 in total, the most ever given in a single battle to date. Famous Battles of the Marine Corps: TRIPOLI – In 1805, America assembled an expeditionary force of Marines to subdue the Barbary Coast pirates who were raiding American merchant ships in the Mediterranean. Lieutenant Presley O’Bannon and his Marines marched across 600 miles of North Africa’s Libyan Desert to successfully storm the fortified Tripolitanian city of Derna. The first verse of the Marines’ Hymn recalls the battle, which lives in Marine tradition: “From the Halls of Montezuma to the shores of Tripoli.” BELLEAU WOOD – America entered World War I in 1918 to reinforce the battered French and British troops waging a desperate fight against Germany. A division of Marines was sent to Belleau Wood to support the French army. As the Marines arrived, the French troops were retreating. When a French officer suggested that the Marines join the retreat, Captain Lloyd Williams responded, “Retreat, hell! We just got here.” IWO JIMA – On February 19, 1945, America sent the United States Marines to seize the island of Iwo Jima. Japanese soldiers defneding the island had converted it into a deadly maze of defensive fortifications, tunnels and overlapping fields of machine gun fire. The battle for the island raged for a month. According to the Marine Lt. Gen, H. M. Smith, it was “the toughest and hardest fight in Marine Corps history.” During the battle, a group of Marines raised the American flag at the summit of Mount Suribachi, the highest point on the island. The legendary photograph of the flag raising has become a Marine icon, symbolizing the fighting spirit and the unflagging dedication of the United States Marines. Over a quarter of the Medals of Honor awarded to marines in World War II were given for conduct in the invasion of Iwo Jima — 27 in total, the most ever given in a single battle to date. Slide14:  CHOSIN RESERVOIR – The North Korean invasion of South Korea in 1950 caught the free world off-guard. In fact, our forces came very close to defeat. In a bold move to reverse the tide of the war, the 1st Marine Division, supported by the 1st Marine Aircraft Wing, landed at Inchon and cut off the bulk of the North Korean Army. As the Allies drove north toward the Yalu River, Chinese Communist forces poured over the Manchurian border, trapping the Marines near the Chosin Reservoir. Written off for lost, the Marines regrouped and fought their way to the sea, where they rejoined the American forces. INCHON – Inchon harborwas the site of a brilliantly executed amphibious Marine assault that turned the tide against North Korean forces during the Korean War. Conceived by General Douglas MacArthur, the plan landed the 70,000 Marines in X Corps 100 miles behind the North Korean army and had the remainder on the run. KHE SANH – Khe Sanh, a remote but strategic outpost near the Laos border, was facing a full-scale siege by the North Vietnamese Army (NVA) in January 1968. The NVA finally launched its attack on the morning of January 21, 1968. The NVA predicted Khe Sanh would be an over-whelming victory for them, one that would force the US to sue for peace. The Marines of Khe Sanh thought otherwise. Their determination and bravery prevented the North Vietnamese from ever penetrating US defenses. CHOSIN RESERVOIR – The North Korean invasion of South Korea in 1950 caught the free world off-guard. In fact, our forces came very close to defeat. In a bold move to reverse the tide of the war, the 1st Marine Division, supported by the 1st Marine Aircraft Wing, landed at Inchon and cut off the bulk of the North Korean Army. As the Allies drove north toward the Yalu River, Chinese Communist forces poured over the Manchurian border, trapping the Marines near the Chosin Reservoir. Written off for lost, the Marines regrouped and fought their way to the sea, where they rejoined the American forces. INCHON – Inchon harborwas the site of a brilliantly executed amphibious Marine assault that turned the tide against North Korean forces during the Korean War. Conceived by General Douglas MacArthur, the plan landed the 70,000 Marines in X Corps 100 miles behind the North Korean army and had the remainder on the run. KHE SANH – Khe Sanh, a remote but strategic outpost near the Laos border, was facing a full-scale siege by the North Vietnamese Army (NVA) in January 1968. The NVA finally launched its attack on the morning of January 21, 1968. The NVA predicted Khe Sanh would be an over-whelming victory for them, one that would force the US to sue for peace. The Marines of Khe Sanh thought otherwise. Their determination and bravery prevented the North Vietnamese from ever penetrating US defenses. Slide15:  Famous Marines: SgtMaj Dan Daly – Two-time Medal of Honor recipient MajGen Smedley Butler – Two-time Medal of Honor recipient Archibald Henderson – Grand Old Man of the Marine Corps (Commandant for 39 years between 1820 and 1859) Capt Samuel J. Nicholas – First Commandant of the Marine Corps LtGen Lewis “Chesty” Puller - The most decorated Marine in history, including five Navy Crosses LtCol A.A. Cunningham – First Marine aviator Opha Mae Johnson – first female Marine Marine Terms: "First to Fight“ – Marines have been in then forefront of every American war since the founding of the Corps. They have carried out over 300 landings on foreign shores. They have served everywhere, from the poles to the tropics. Their record of readiness reflects pride, responsibility and challenge. "Leathernecks“ – The Marines' long-standing nickname goes back to the leather stock or neckpiece, which was part of the Marine uniform from 1775 to 1875. The leather bands around their throats were intended to protect the neck during battle. Famous Marines: SgtMaj Dan Daly – Two-time Medal of Honor recipient MajGen Smedley Butler – Two-time Medal of Honor recipient Archibald Henderson – Grand Old Man of the Marine Corps (Commandant for 39 years between 1820 and 1859) Capt Samuel J. Nicholas – First Commandant of the Marine Corps LtGen Lewis “Chesty” Puller - The most decorated Marine in history, including five Navy Crosses LtCol A.A. Cunningham – First Marine aviator Opha Mae Johnson – first female Marine Marine Terms: "First to Fight“ – Marines have been in then forefront of every American war since the founding of the Corps. They have carried out over 300 landings on foreign shores. They have served everywhere, from the poles to the tropics. Their record of readiness reflects pride, responsibility and challenge. "Leathernecks“ – The Marines' long-standing nickname goes back to the leather stock or neckpiece, which was part of the Marine uniform from 1775 to 1875. The leather bands around their throats were intended to protect the neck during battle. Slide16:  "Devil Dogs" – In the Belleau Wood fighting in 1918, the Germans received a thorough indoctrination in the fighting ability of the Marines. Fighting through supposedly impenetrable woods and capturing terrain supposedly impossible to overtake, the persistent attacks, delivered with unbelievable courage, soon had the Germans calling Marines "teufelhunden,“ referring to the fierce fighting dogs of legendary origin. "Esprit de Corps" – The "spirit" of a unit. This spirit is commonly reflected by all members. It implies devotion and loyalty to the Marine Corps, with deep regard for history, traditions and honor. "Uncommon Valor was a Common Virtue" – Refers to the victories in World War II, especially at Iwo Jima, the largest all-Marine battle in history. Admiral Nimitz's ringing epitome of Marine fighting on Iwo Jima was applied to the entire Marine Corps in World War II. "Jarhead" – A slang term used by sailors as early as World War II to refer to members of the Marine Corps, drawing the term from the resemblance of the Marine dress blues uniform, with its high collar, to a Mason jar. "Semper Fidelis“ – The Motto of the United States Marine Corps. Latin for “Always Faithful.” "Once a Marine, Always a Marine" – Having earned the title of Marine it becomes a integral part of who and what we will become later in life. "Devil Dogs" – In the Belleau Wood fighting in 1918, the Germans received a thorough indoctrination in the fighting ability of the Marines. Fighting through supposedly impenetrable woods and capturing terrain supposedly impossible to overtake, the persistent attacks, delivered with unbelievable courage, soon had the Germans calling Marines "teufelhunden,“ referring to the fierce fighting dogs of legendary origin. "Esprit de Corps" – The "spirit" of a unit. This spirit is commonly reflected by all members. It implies devotion and loyalty to the Marine Corps, with deep regard for history, traditions and honor. "Uncommon Valor was a Common Virtue" – Refers to the victories in World War II, especially at Iwo Jima, the largest all-Marine battle in history. Admiral Nimitz's ringing epitome of Marine fighting on Iwo Jima was applied to the entire Marine Corps in World War II. "Jarhead" – A slang term used by sailors as early as World War II to refer to members of the Marine Corps, drawing the term from the resemblance of the Marine dress blues uniform, with its high collar, to a Mason jar. "Semper Fidelis“ – The Motto of the United States Marine Corps. Latin for “Always Faithful.” "Once a Marine, Always a Marine" – Having earned the title of Marine it becomes a integral part of who and what we will become later in life. Slide17:  Marines’ Hymn: From the Halls of Montezuma - To the shores of Tripoli We fight our country’s battles- In the air, on land and sea First to fight for right and freedom - And to keep our honor clean We are proud to claim the title of - UNITED STATES MARINE Our flag’s unfurled to every breeze - From dawn to setting sun We have fought in every clime and place - Where we could take a gun In the snow of far off northern lands - And in the sunny tropic scenes You will find us always on the job - THE UNITED STATES MARINE Here’s health to you and to our Corps - Which we are proud to serve In many a strife we’ve fought for life - And never lost our nerve If the Army and the Navy - Ever look on Heaven’s scenes They will find the streets are guarded by UNITED STATES MARINES Rifleman’s Creed: This is my rifle. There are many like it, but this one is mine. My rifle is my best friend. It is my life. I must master it as I must master my life. My rifle, without me, is useless. Without my rifle, I am useless. I must fire my rifle true. I must shoot straighter than my enemy who is trying to kill me. I must shoot him before he shoots me. I will... My rifle and myself know that what counts in this war is not the rounds we fire, the noise of our burst, nor the smoke we make. We know that it is the hits that count. We will hit... My rifle is human, even as I, because it is my life. Thus, I will learn it as a brother. I will learn its weaknesses, its strength, its parts, its accessories, its sights and its barrel. I will ever guard it against the ravages of weather and damage as I will ever guard my legs, my arms, my eyes and my heart against damage. I will keep my rifle clean and ready. We will become part of each other. We will... Before God, I swear this creed. My rifle and myself are the defenders of my country. We are the masters of our enemy. We are the saviors of my life. So be it, until victory is America's and there is no enemy, but peace! Marines’ Hymn: From the Halls of Montezuma - To the shores of Tripoli We fight our country’s battles- In the air, on land and sea First to fight for right and freedom - And to keep our honor clean We are proud to claim the title of - UNITED STATES MARINE Our flag’s unfurled to every breeze - From dawn to setting sun We have fought in every clime and place - Where we could take a gun In the snow of far off northern lands - And in the sunny tropic scenes You will find us always on the job - THE UNITED STATES MARINE Here’s health to you and to our Corps - Which we are proud to serve In many a strife we’ve fought for life - And never lost our nerve If the Army and the Navy - Ever look on Heaven’s scenes They will find the streets are guarded by UNITED STATES MARINES Rifleman’s Creed: This is my rifle. There are many like it, but this one is mine. My rifle is my best friend. It is my life. I must master it as I must master my life. My rifle, without me, is useless. Without my rifle, I am useless. I must fire my rifle true. I must shoot straighter than my enemy who is trying to kill me. I must shoot him before he shoots me. I will... My rifle and myself know that what counts in this war is not the rounds we fire, the noise of our burst, nor the smoke we make. We know that it is the hits that count. We will hit... My rifle is human, even as I, because it is my life. Thus, I will learn it as a brother. I will learn its weaknesses, its strength, its parts, its accessories, its sights and its barrel. I will ever guard it against the ravages of weather and damage as I will ever guard my legs, my arms, my eyes and my heart against damage. I will keep my rifle clean and ready. We will become part of each other. We will... Before God, I swear this creed. My rifle and myself are the defenders of my country. We are the masters of our enemy. We are the saviors of my life. So be it, until victory is America's and there is no enemy, but peace! Slide18:  Naval Jargon: Aye, Aye: Response to an order signifying that an order is heard, understood and will be carried out. Bulkhead: The wall Carry On: An order to resume or continue previous activity, usually after coming to attention. Given by senior officer. Deck: The floor/ground Field Day: A day to clean the barracks/ compartment/berthing Go Fasters: Running shoes Hatch: Door Head: A toilet and washroom Porthole: The window Rack: The bed Secure/Square Away: Put items away in proper place Squad Bay: Living quarters or rooms Lifesaving Steps: Restore the breathing Stop the bleeding Protect the wound Treat for shock Purpose of Close-Order Drill: To move troops in an organized manner from place to place. To instill discipline within the unit. To increase confidence of the unit leaders. To allow troops to handle individual weapons. To provide formations from which combat formations could be readily assumed. Naval Jargon: Aye, Aye: Response to an order signifying that an order is heard, understood and will be carried out. Bulkhead: The wall Carry On: An order to resume or continue previous activity, usually after coming to attention. Given by senior officer. Deck: The floor/ground Field Day: A day to clean the barracks/ compartment/berthing Go Fasters: Running shoes Hatch: Door Head: A toilet and washroom Porthole: The window Rack: The bed Secure/Square Away: Put items away in proper place Squad Bay: Living quarters or rooms Lifesaving Steps: Restore the breathing Stop the bleeding Protect the wound Treat for shock Purpose of Close-Order Drill: To move troops in an organized manner from place to place. To instill discipline within the unit. To increase confidence of the unit leaders. To allow troops to handle individual weapons. To provide formations from which combat formations could be readily assumed. Slide21:  Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) All midshipmen on summer cruise and active duty service members are subject to the UCMJ. (Selected Articles) 15: NJP (Non-Judicial Punishment or to punish without a court martial) “Captain’s Mast”-USN / “Office Hours”-USMC 31: 5th Amendment Rights (rights of the accused) 86: Unauthorized Absence 89: Disrespect of a Commissioned Officer 91: Insubordinate Conduct Towards a Non-Commissioned Officer 92: Failure to Obey a Lawful Order 112A: Drug Abuse 133: Conduct Unbecoming of an Officer 134: General Article Courts-Martial A trial in a military court that judges members of the armed forces and is of equal significance to a trial in a federal court. 1. General (most severe) 2. Special 3. Summary (least severe) Deadly Force Is the force applied to cause death or serious bodily harm. It is justified when: In self defense In defense of property involving national security In defense of property inherently dangerous to others Prevention of a felony Prevention of an escape By lawful order Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) All midshipmen on summer cruise and active duty service members are subject to the UCMJ. (Selected Articles) 15: NJP (Non-Judicial Punishment or to punish without a court martial) “Captain’s Mast”-USN / “Office Hours”-USMC 31: 5th Amendment Rights (rights of the accused) 86: Unauthorized Absence 89: Disrespect of a Commissioned Officer 91: Insubordinate Conduct Towards a Non-Commissioned Officer 92: Failure to Obey a Lawful Order 112A: Drug Abuse 133: Conduct Unbecoming of an Officer 134: General Article Courts-Martial A trial in a military court that judges members of the armed forces and is of equal significance to a trial in a federal court. 1. General (most severe) 2. Special 3. Summary (least severe) Deadly Force Is the force applied to cause death or serious bodily harm. It is justified when: In self defense In defense of property involving national security In defense of property inherently dangerous to others Prevention of a felony Prevention of an escape By lawful order Slide22:  Hazing: Hazing is defined as any conduct whereby a military member or members, regardless of service or rank, without proper authority causes another military member or members, regardless of service or rank, to suffer or be exposed to any activity which is cruel, abusive, humiliating, oppressive, demeaning, or harmful. Hazing is prohibited and will not be tolerated. It is the responsibility of every Sailor and Marine to ensure that hazing does not occur any form at any level. Every service member has the responsibility to make the appropriate authorities aware of each violation of this policy. For further information on hazing, see SECNAVINST 1610.2A. Equal Opportunity (EO): Unlawful discrimination based on race, ethnicity, color, religion, gender or national origin is strictly prohibited and will not be tolerated. It is the responsibility of every Sailor and Marine to ensure that unlawful discrimination does not occur in any form at any level. Every service member has the responsibility to make the appropriate authorities aware of each violation of this policy. For further information on equal opportunity, see SECNAVINST 5350.16. Hazing: Hazing is defined as any conduct whereby a military member or members, regardless of service or rank, without proper authority causes another military member or members, regardless of service or rank, to suffer or be exposed to any activity which is cruel, abusive, humiliating, oppressive, demeaning, or harmful. Hazing is prohibited and will not be tolerated. It is the responsibility of every Sailor and Marine to ensure that hazing does not occur any form at any level. Every service member has the responsibility to make the appropriate authorities aware of each violation of this policy. For further information on hazing, see SECNAVINST 1610.2A. Equal Opportunity (EO): Unlawful discrimination based on race, ethnicity, color, religion, gender or national origin is strictly prohibited and will not be tolerated. It is the responsibility of every Sailor and Marine to ensure that unlawful discrimination does not occur in any form at any level. Every service member has the responsibility to make the appropriate authorities aware of each violation of this policy. For further information on equal opportunity, see SECNAVINST 5350.16. Slide23:  Substance Abuse Prevention and Control: Alcohol and drug abuse by members of the Armed Forces is incompatible with the maintenance of high standards of performance, military discipline, readiness, and reliable mission accomplishment. Therefore, it is the goal of the Department of the Navy to be free from the effects of alcohol and drug abuse; the illegal possession of and/or the trafficking of drugs by Department of the Navy military personnel; and the wrongful possession, use, distribution, or promotion of drugs or drug abuse paraphernalia. The DoN policy on drug abuse is zero tolerance. For further information on drug abuse, see SECNAVINST 5300.28D. Sexual Harassment: Sexual harassment is a form of sex discrimination that involves unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when: Submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of a person's job, pay or career; or Submission to, or rejection of, such conduct by a person is used as a basis for career or employment decisions affecting that person; or Such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual's work performance or creates an intimidating, hostile or offensive working environment. The DoN policy on sexual harassment is zero tolerance. For further information on sexual harassment see SECNAVINST 5300.26D Substance Abuse Prevention and Control: Alcohol and drug abuse by members of the Armed Forces is incompatible with the maintenance of high standards of performance, military discipline, readiness, and reliable mission accomplishment. Therefore, it is the goal of the Department of the Navy to be free from the effects of alcohol and drug abuse; the illegal possession of and/or the trafficking of drugs by Department of the Navy military personnel; and the wrongful possession, use, distribution, or promotion of drugs or drug abuse paraphernalia. The DoN policy on drug abuse is zero tolerance. For further information on drug abuse, see SECNAVINST 5300.28D. Sexual Harassment: Sexual harassment is a form of sex discrimination that involves unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when: Submission to such conduct is made either explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of a person's job, pay or career; or Submission to, or rejection of, such conduct by a person is used as a basis for career or employment decisions affecting that person; or Such conduct has the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual's work performance or creates an intimidating, hostile or offensive working environment. The DoN policy on sexual harassment is zero tolerance. For further information on sexual harassment see SECNAVINST 5300.26D Slide24:  Uniform Wear: Uniform Wear: NROTC students are required to wear designated uniforms during all NROTC activities. The Uniform of the Day is normally the Certified Navy Twill (CNT) Khaki. Guidance: Uniforms worn by midshipmen match, as closely as practical, those worn by active duty naval officers. Specific guidance on those uniforms can be found in United States Navy Uniform Regulations, NAVPERS 15665 (series) or United States Marine Corps Uniform Regulations, MCO P1020.34F. Uniform equivalents are promulgated in NROTCUINST 1020.1G. Civilian Clothes: Midshipmen shall ensure that their dress and personal appearance are appropriate for the occasion and will not discredit the Navy or Marine Corps. Current styles and fashions which are conservative and in good taste are authorized. “Civies” shall always present a clean, groomed, and proper appearance such that battalion members will be viewed with the respect and dignity imparted in their undertaking of office. Wearing or displaying clothing, jewelry, tattoos, etc., depicting marijuana or any other controlled substance or advocating drug use/abuse is prohibited at all times. Also prohibited is revealing clothing and clothing of vulgar, sexist, or racial nature. Uniform Wear: Uniform Wear: NROTC students are required to wear designated uniforms during all NROTC activities. The Uniform of the Day is normally the Certified Navy Twill (CNT) Khaki. Guidance: Uniforms worn by midshipmen match, as closely as practical, those worn by active duty naval officers. Specific guidance on those uniforms can be found in United States Navy Uniform Regulations, NAVPERS 15665 (series) or United States Marine Corps Uniform Regulations, MCO P1020.34F. Uniform equivalents are promulgated in NROTCUINST 1020.1G. Civilian Clothes: Midshipmen shall ensure that their dress and personal appearance are appropriate for the occasion and will not discredit the Navy or Marine Corps. Current styles and fashions which are conservative and in good taste are authorized. “Civies” shall always present a clean, groomed, and proper appearance such that battalion members will be viewed with the respect and dignity imparted in their undertaking of office. Wearing or displaying clothing, jewelry, tattoos, etc., depicting marijuana or any other controlled substance or advocating drug use/abuse is prohibited at all times. Also prohibited is revealing clothing and clothing of vulgar, sexist, or racial nature. Slide25:  Backpacks: Navy Option Midshipmen and Officer Candidates are authorized to wear backpacks in uniform under limited conditions. The backpack shall be all black, free of any obtrusive logo or design and shall be worn over the left shoulder only to facilitate saluting. Backpacks are not authorized for Marines or Marine Option Midshipmen while in uniform. Cellular Phones: While in uniform members of the battalion will not “walk and talk” on cellular phones. “Walking and talking” prohibits battalion members from rendering proper salutes and greetings. Public Displays of Affection: PDA (e.g. hugging, kissing, holding hands) while in uniform are not authorized. Backpacks: Navy Option Midshipmen and Officer Candidates are authorized to wear backpacks in uniform under limited conditions. The backpack shall be all black, free of any obtrusive logo or design and shall be worn over the left shoulder only to facilitate saluting. Backpacks are not authorized for Marines or Marine Option Midshipmen while in uniform. Cellular Phones: While in uniform members of the battalion will not “walk and talk” on cellular phones. “Walking and talking” prohibits battalion members from rendering proper salutes and greetings. Public Displays of Affection: PDA (e.g. hugging, kissing, holding hands) while in uniform are not authorized. Slide26:  Midshipman Uniform Standards (Male): Trousers are to be worn at a length to cover the upper part of the rear of the shoe by approximately 1". Navy midshipmen may wear a plain gold tie clasp when wearing the black four-in-hand tie if the clasp meets the following provisions: a. Must have a plain gold surface (either with or without a Navy anchor). The surface cannot be a brushed gold, inscribed, or decorated. b. Must be a 2 1/2" x 1/4" approximate dimension. c. If worn with the service dress blue uniform, it must not be visible when the coat is worn. d. Specifics on correct uniform wear are delineated in U.S. Navy Uniform Regulations, NAVPERS 15665 (series). Midshipman Uniform Standards (Female): The skirt will be no longer than 1 1/2" below the crease in the back of the knee, and no higher than 1 1/2" above the crease. Small pearl earrings may be worn with dinner and dress uniforms. Other uniforms require 1/4" ball earrings with brushed gold surface. The length of the raincoat and bridgecoat should correspond to that of the uniform skirt. The handbag is worn with the strap attached and lengthened so that the individual's left hand cups the bottom of the purse. It is worn on the left shoulder. A clutch style handbag is authorized for wear with service dress uniforms. Trousers are to be worn at a length to cover the upper part of the rear of the shoe by approximately 1". Specifics on correct uniform wear are delineated in U.S. Navy Uniform Regulations. Midshipman Uniform Standards (Male): Trousers are to be worn at a length to cover the upper part of the rear of the shoe by approximately 1". Navy midshipmen may wear a plain gold tie clasp when wearing the black four-in-hand tie if the clasp meets the following provisions: a. Must have a plain gold surface (either with or without a Navy anchor). The surface cannot be a brushed gold, inscribed, or decorated. b. Must be a 2 1/2" x 1/4" approximate dimension. c. If worn with the service dress blue uniform, it must not be visible when the coat is worn. d. Specifics on correct uniform wear are delineated in U.S. Navy Uniform Regulations, NAVPERS 15665 (series). Midshipman Uniform Standards (Female): The skirt will be no longer than 1 1/2" below the crease in the back of the knee, and no higher than 1 1/2" above the crease. Small pearl earrings may be worn with dinner and dress uniforms. Other uniforms require 1/4" ball earrings with brushed gold surface. The length of the raincoat and bridgecoat should correspond to that of the uniform skirt. The handbag is worn with the strap attached and lengthened so that the individual's left hand cups the bottom of the purse. It is worn on the left shoulder. A clutch style handbag is authorized for wear with service dress uniforms. Trousers are to be worn at a length to cover the upper part of the rear of the shoe by approximately 1". Specifics on correct uniform wear are delineated in U.S. Navy Uniform Regulations. Slide27:  Navy Uniform Wear: Year Insignia: A midshipman's class designation is denoted by appropriate year insignia. Shoulder Boards: Year group is designated by shoulder boards on the male, service dress white and summer white uniforms. Shoulder boards are worn by all midshipmen on the bridgecoat..Female midshipmen wear soft shoulder boards on the summer white uniforms. Shoulder boards are worn with the bitter end of the fouled anchor chain pointing aft. Collar Devices: On all collar devices the bitter end of the fouled anchor chain points outboard. a. Midshipmen Fourth Class. Wear no collar devices. b. Midshipmen Third Class. Wear the Navy anchor on the right collar only. c. Midshipmen Second Class. Wear the Navy anchor on both collars. d. Midshipmen First Class. Wear Navy eagle and anchor on both collars. Midshipman Officer Insignia: All midshipmen officers shall wear the appropriate rank in shoulder boards, collar devices, and sleeve insignia. Collar Devices. Worn same as above. Sleeve Insignia. Worn on both sleeves of the service dress blue coat centered on the out side of the sleeve 2" above and parallel to the edge of the cuff. The gold star is centered above the stripes with one ray pointing down and the point 3/4" above the uppermost stripe. Name Tags. Worn centered over the right breast pocket, 1/4" above the pocket. Name tags are not worn when medals are prescribed. Qualification Insignia. Enlisted Dolphins, SSBN Patrol Pins, Basic Parachutist (Jump Wings), Naval Parachutist, and Scuba Diver insignia are to be centered 1/4" above the left pocket or any row of ribbons. Garrison Cap Insignia. The 1" fouled anchor insignia is attached to the left side of the garrison cap, shank perpendicular to the ground, 2" from the front edge and 1 1/2" from the bottom edge to the center of the insignia. For female midshipmen it is centered between the top and bottom edges of the cap apron. All-weather Coats and Khaki Jackets. Midshipmen officers wear rank insignia on the shoulder straps of all-weather coats and khaki jackets. The insignia are the same as those worn on collars and are centered 1" from and parallel to the shoulder seam. Navy Uniform Wear: Year Insignia: A midshipman's class designation is denoted by appropriate year insignia. Shoulder Boards: Year group is designated by shoulder boards on the male, service dress white and summer white uniforms. Shoulder boards are worn by all midshipmen on the bridgecoat..Female midshipmen wear soft shoulder boards on the summer white uniforms. Shoulder boards are worn with the bitter end of the fouled anchor chain pointing aft. Collar Devices: On all collar devices the bitter end of the fouled anchor chain points outboard. a. Midshipmen Fourth Class. Wear no collar devices. b. Midshipmen Third Class. Wear the Navy anchor on the right collar only. c. Midshipmen Second Class. Wear the Navy anchor on both collars. d. Midshipmen First Class. Wear Navy eagle and anchor on both collars. Midshipman Officer Insignia: All midshipmen officers shall wear the appropriate rank in shoulder boards, collar devices, and sleeve insignia. Collar Devices. Worn same as above. Sleeve Insignia. Worn on both sleeves of the service dress blue coat centered on the out side of the sleeve 2" above and parallel to the edge of the cuff. The gold star is centered above the stripes with one ray pointing down and the point 3/4" above the uppermost stripe. Name Tags. Worn centered over the right breast pocket, 1/4" above the pocket. Name tags are not worn when medals are prescribed. Qualification Insignia. Enlisted Dolphins, SSBN Patrol Pins, Basic Parachutist (Jump Wings), Naval Parachutist, and Scuba Diver insignia are to be centered 1/4" above the left pocket or any row of ribbons. Garrison Cap Insignia. The 1" fouled anchor insignia is attached to the left side of the garrison cap, shank perpendicular to the ground, 2" from the front edge and 1 1/2" from the bottom edge to the center of the insignia. For female midshipmen it is centered between the top and bottom edges of the cap apron. All-weather Coats and Khaki Jackets. Midshipmen officers wear rank insignia on the shoulder straps of all-weather coats and khaki jackets. The insignia are the same as those worn on collars and are centered 1" from and parallel to the shoulder seam. Slide28:  Marine Option Insignia: Clasp, necktie, USMC. This article will be worn in lieu of any other tie clasp. Insignia, Shoulder, USMC (screwpost). These insignia replace the anchor insignia on the shoulder boards. They do not replace the stars on midshipman officer shoulder boards. Insignia, Collar, USMC (prong & clutch). These insignia, placed so that the eagle's wings are parallel to the deck, replace the various anchor devices worn on the shirt as indicated below: a. Midshipmen Fourth Class. Wear no collar device. b. Midshipmen Third Class. Wear the Marine Corps insignia on the right collar only. c. Midshipmen Second Class. Wear the Marine Corps insignia on the left collar only. d. Midshipmen First Class. Wear the Marine Corps insignia on both collars. e. Midshipmen Officers. Wear the rank insignia on both collars. f. All Marine Option Midshipmen. The prong and clutch insignia will also replace the large anchor emblem worn on the lapel of the service dress blue jacket. g. Insignia, Service Cap, USMC (large). This insignia replaces the fouled anchor worn on the combination cap. h. Insignia, Garrison Cap, USMC (small, left). This insignia replaces the anchor insignia worn on the fore-and-aft cap. i. Buckle, Belt, USMC. The belt tip will extend from 2 to 4 inches beyond the belt buckle. Marine Option Insignia: Clasp, necktie, USMC. This article will be worn in lieu of any other tie clasp. Insignia, Shoulder, USMC (screwpost). These insignia replace the anchor insignia on the shoulder boards. They do not replace the stars on midshipman officer shoulder boards. Insignia, Collar, USMC (prong & clutch). These insignia, placed so that the eagle's wings are parallel to the deck, replace the various anchor devices worn on the shirt as indicated below: a. Midshipmen Fourth Class. Wear no collar device. b. Midshipmen Third Class. Wear the Marine Corps insignia on the right collar only. c. Midshipmen Second Class. Wear the Marine Corps insignia on the left collar only. d. Midshipmen First Class. Wear the Marine Corps insignia on both collars. e. Midshipmen Officers. Wear the rank insignia on both collars. f. All Marine Option Midshipmen. The prong and clutch insignia will also replace the large anchor emblem worn on the lapel of the service dress blue jacket. g. Insignia, Service Cap, USMC (large). This insignia replaces the fouled anchor worn on the combination cap. h. Insignia, Garrison Cap, USMC (small, left). This insignia replaces the anchor insignia worn on the fore-and-aft cap. i. Buckle, Belt, USMC. The belt tip will extend from 2 to 4 inches beyond the belt buckle. Slide29:  Grooming Standards for Midshipmen (Male): Grooming standards are based on neatness, cleanliness, safety, military image, and the appearance in uniform of members of the naval service. The standards established herein are not intended to be overly restrictive nor designed to isolate Navy and Marine Corps men or women from society. Hair: Hair will be neat, clean and present a groomed appearance. Hair will be closely trimmed at the bottom and will taper upwards. Hair on the back of the neck may not touch the collar. Hair will be no longer than 4" and groomed so that it does not touch the ears or extend below eyebrows when headgear is removed, nor interfere with proper wearing of the headgear. Bulk of the hair shall not exceed 2". Bulk is defined as the distance that the mass of the hair protrudes from the scalp when groomed (as opposed to the length of the hair). Varying hair-styles are permitted, provided these styles meet the criteria of maximum length and bulk, tapered neck and sides, and do not interfere with the proper wearing of military headgear. Plaited or braided hair is not permitted. Sideburns: Sideburns shall be neatly trimmed and tapered in the same manner as the haircut. Sideburns shall not extend below a point with the middle of the ear, shall be of even width (not flared), and shall end with a clean shaven horizontal line. Beards and Moustaches: NROTC midshipmen are not authorized to wear beards. If a moustache is worn it shall be well groomed and neatly trimmed at all times in order not to present a ragged appearance. The moustache will not go below a horizontal line extending across the corners of the mouth and no more than 1/4" beyond a vertical line drawn upward from the corners of the mouth. Marine Corps Options: Marine Corps option grooming standards are contained in Marine Corps Uniform Regulations 1004.5.b.1. Hair will be neat and closely trimmed. The hair may be clipped at the edges of the side and back; will be evenly graduated from zero length at the hairline in the lower portion of the head to the upper portion of the head; and will not be over three inches in length fully extended on the upper portion of the head. Moustaches will not extend beyond the edges of the mouth and beards are not permitted. Grooming Standards for Midshipmen (Male): Grooming standards are based on neatness, cleanliness, safety, military image, and the appearance in uniform of members of the naval service. The standards established herein are not intended to be overly restrictive nor designed to isolate Navy and Marine Corps men or women from society. Hair: Hair will be neat, clean and present a groomed appearance. Hair will be closely trimmed at the bottom and will taper upwards. Hair on the back of the neck may not touch the collar. Hair will be no longer than 4" and groomed so that it does not touch the ears or extend below eyebrows when headgear is removed, nor interfere with proper wearing of the headgear. Bulk of the hair shall not exceed 2". Bulk is defined as the distance that the mass of the hair protrudes from the scalp when groomed (as opposed to the length of the hair). Varying hair-styles are permitted, provided these styles meet the criteria of maximum length and bulk, tapered neck and sides, and do not interfere with the proper wearing of military headgear. Plaited or braided hair is not permitted. Sideburns: Sideburns shall be neatly trimmed and tapered in the same manner as the haircut. Sideburns shall not extend below a point with the middle of the ear, shall be of even width (not flared), and shall end with a clean shaven horizontal line. Beards and Moustaches: NROTC midshipmen are not authorized to wear beards. If a moustache is worn it shall be well groomed and neatly trimmed at all times in order not to present a ragged appearance. The moustache will not go below a horizontal line extending across the corners of the mouth and no more than 1/4" beyond a vertical line drawn upward from the corners of the mouth. Marine Corps Options: Marine Corps option grooming standards are contained in Marine Corps Uniform Regulations 1004.5.b.1. Hair will be neat and closely trimmed. The hair may be clipped at the edges of the side and back; will be evenly graduated from zero length at the hairline in the lower portion of the head to the upper portion of the head; and will not be over three inches in length fully extended on the upper portion of the head. Moustaches will not extend beyond the edges of the mouth and beards are not permitted. Slide30:  Midshipman Grooming Standards (Female): Hair: Hair may touch, but may not fall below the bottom edge of the uniform collar. Spit curls or "ringlets" that fall below the bottom of the ear are not permitted while in uniform. Long hair will be neatly arranged so that it does not interfere with the wearing of military headgear. Unsecured ponytails and styles which are distinctly unbalanced or lopsided are prohibited. Multiple braiding is authorized. If hair extensions are used in the braiding of the hair, the extensions must have the same general appearance as the individual’s natural hair. Braided hairstyles will be conservative Barrettes, rubber bands, and hairpins are permitted, but they must match the hair color as closely as possible. They should not be extremely large or noticeable. A maximum of two barrettes maybe used when pinning up hair. Cosmetics: The use of cosmetics, if worn, will be applied conservatively and will complement the individual’s complexion tone. Exaggerated or faddish cosmetic styles are inappropriate with the uniform and will not be worn. Non-eccentric lipstick and nail polish colors, to include colorless nail polish, may be worn with all uniforms. Fingernails with multiple colors and decorative ornamentation are prohibited. Nail length will be no longer than 1/4" from the tip of the finger. The affect of cosmetics should be to subtly enhance one's appearance. Midshipman Grooming Standards (Female): Hair: Hair may touch, but may not fall below the bottom edge of the uniform collar. Spit curls or "ringlets" that fall below

Add a comment

Related presentations

Related pages

SOL Essential Question Answer

Essential Knowledge Packet U.S. History 1865-Present Ashley Ide 2011-2012 SOL Essential Question Answer
Read more

Knowledge Packet - J3 Competition

KNOWLEDGE PACKET. J3 Competition Inc ... COMPLETE HST EXCENTRIC BUSH D.22-10 New - ... The information in this packet is ‘general knowledge’ and may ...
Read more

Captain's Packet - Spring 2016 | Montgomery County Tennis ...

New Players; Junior; 10 and Under; Community; ... 2016 Captain's Packet_Spring Edition.doc. Junior Tennis. ... Knowledge Center.
Read more

SET-UP GUIDE - Melbourne Kart Centre

SET-UP GUIDE AUSTRALIAN IMPORTER ... Remo Racing – Kosmic Owner’s Knowledge Packet ... 0211.D0KIT Complete HST Excentric Bush D.22-10 New - 2008
Read more

DQ Element 2 Vodcast Packet for Teachers - Welcome to the ...

7.Organizing%Students%to%Interact%with%New%Knowledge%% % ... Microsoft Word - DQ Element 2 Vodcast Packet for Teachers.docx Author: Ora Meles
Read more

Skills Strand Grade 2 - EngageNY

Fluency Packet Skills Strand Grade 2 Core Knowledge Language Arts® New York Edition
Read more

Knowledge Packet Challenge - Prateeksha Maurya - YouTube

Try something new! Loading... Working... Sign in to add this to Watch Later Add to Loading playlists... ...
Read more

Knowledge Packet Challenge - YouTube

Try something new! Loading... Working... Sign in to add this to Watch Later Add to Loading playlists... ...
Read more

Oracle Communications | Knowledge Zone | Oracle PartnerNetwork

Oracle Communications Knowledge Zone. I want to: ... Oracle Communications solutions span the communications industry landscape ... What's New. Oracle ...
Read more