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Kingdom Animalia Biology Lesson PowerPoint, Taxonomy, Animal Phylums

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Information about Kingdom Animalia Biology Lesson PowerPoint, Taxonomy, Animal Phylums
Education

Published on August 6, 2013

Author: sciencepowerpointcom

Source: slideshare.net

Description

This PowerPoint is one small part of the Taxonomy and Classification unit from www.sciencepowerpoint.com. A 3800+ slide Five Part PowerPoint presentation becomes the roadmap for an amazing and interactive science experience full of built-in lab activities, built-in quizzes, video links, class notes(red slides),review games, projects, unit notes, answer keys, and much more. Also included is a student version of the unit that is much like the teachers but missing the answer keys, quizzes, PowerPoint review games, hidden box challenges, owl, and surprises meant for the classroom. This is a great resource to distribute to your students and support professionals. The Classification and Taxonomy Unit covers topics associated with Taxonomy and Classification. The unit examines all of the Kingdoms of Life in detail. Areas of Focus within The Taxonomy and Classification Unit: -Taxonomy, Classification, Need for Taxonomy vs. Common Names, What is a Species?, Dichotomous Keys, What does Classification Use?, The Domains of Life, Kingdoms of Life,The 8 Taxonomic Ranks, Humans Taxonomic Classification, Kingdom Monera, Prokaryotic Cells, Types of Eubacteria, Bacteria Classification, Gram Staining,Bacterial Food Borne Illnesses, Penicillin and Antiseptic, Oral Hygiene and Plaque, Bacterial Reproduction (Binary Fission), Asexual Reproduction, Positives and Negatives of Bacteria, Protista, Plant-like Protists, Animal-like Protists, Fungi-like Protists, Animalia, Characteristics of Animalia, Animal Symmetry, Phylums of Animalia (Extensive), Classes of Chordata, Mammals, Subclasses of Mammals, Characteristics of Mammals, Fungi, Positives and Negatives of Fungi, Divisions of Fungi (Extensive), Parts of a Mushroom, 3 Roles of Fungi, Fungi Reproduction, Mold Prevention, Plant Divisions, Kingdom Plantae. If you have any questions please feel free to contact me. Thanks again and best wishes. Sincerely, Ryan Murphy www.sciencepowerpoint@gmail.com
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Phylum Echinodermata Phylum Molluska Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Learn more about Echinodermata at… http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/accounts/Echinoder mata/

http://sciencepowerpoint.com/Website Link:

 New Area of Focus: Animalia Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Domains and Kingdoms Domain Eubacteria Archae- bacteria Kingdom Eubacteria Archae- bacteria Protista Plantae Fungi Animalia Cell Type Prokaryotic (No nucleus) Prokaryotic (No nucleus) Eukaryotic (Nucleus) Eukaryotic (Nucleus) Eukaryotic (Nucleus) Eukaryotic (Nucleus) Single or Multi- Cellular Single (Unicellular) Single (Unicellular) Single (Unicellular) Multicellular Multicellular Multicellular Gets Energy from.. Varies Varies Varies Sunlight Absorbs Consumes Food Hetero- trophs

• Domains and Kingdoms Domain Eubacteria Archae- bacteria Kingdom Eubacteria Archae- bacteria Protista Plantae Fungi Animalia Cell Type Prokaryotic (No nucleus) Prokaryotic (No nucleus) Eukaryotic (Nucleus) Eukaryotic (Nucleus) Eukaryotic (Nucleus) Eukaryotic (Nucleus) Single or Multi- Cellular Single (Unicellular) Single (Unicellular) Single (Unicellular) Multicellular Multicellular Multicellular Gets Energy from.. Varies Varies Varies Sunlight Absorbs Consumes Food Hetero- trophs

 Characteristics of Animalia.  -  -  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Learn more about the characteristics of animals at… http://animals.about.com/od/animal-facts/a/animal- characteristics.htm

 No cell walls. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Animals have a period of embryonic development. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Animals have a period of embryonic development. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Fertilization: The joining of the egg and the sperm. – The sperm and egg contain genetic information that will allow this one cell to multiply into trillions. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Animals eat food. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Animals eat food. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Animals move. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Animals move. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Animals have nervous and muscle tissue. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Animals have diplontic life cycle. Genetic information can come from a mother and father. (Many species) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Placozoa: The simplest animal known. – Smallest amount on DNA of any animal. – Made of only a few thousand cells. • It only has four types of cells compared to our 200 types, – 3 mm across. – May have been the first type of animal evolving from single celled Protists.

• Placozoa: The simplest animal known. – Smallest amount on DNA of any animal. – Made of only a few thousand cells. • It only has four types of cells compared to our 200 types, – 3 mm across. – May have been the first type of animal evolving from single celled Protists.

• Animals Available Sheet.

• Animals Available Sheet.

• Asexual reproduction: A mode of reproduction by which offspring arise from a single parent.

• Asexual reproduction: A mode of reproduction by which offspring arise from a single parent. – The offspring inherit the genes of that parent only, it’s reproduction which does not involve meiosis or fertilization.

• A few ways animals reproduce without two parents. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Budding: Offspring develop as a growth on the body of the parent.

• Budding: Offspring develop as a growth on the body of the parent. Offspring

• Fragmentation: As certain tiny worms grow to full size, they spontaneously break up into 8 or 9 pieces. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Fragmentation: As certain tiny worms grow to full size, they spontaneously break up into 8 or 9 pieces. Each of these fragments develops into a mature worm, and the process is repeated. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Fragmentation: As certain tiny worms grow to full size, they spontaneously break up into 8 or 9 pieces. Each of these fragments develops into a mature worm, and the process is repeated. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Fragmentation: As certain tiny worms grow to full size, they spontaneously break up into 8 or 9 pieces. Each of these fragments develops into a mature worm, and the process is repeated. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Fragmentation: As certain tiny worms grow to full size, they spontaneously break up into 8 or 9 pieces. Each of these fragments develops into a mature worm, and the process is repeated. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Parthenogenesis ("virgin birth"), the females produce eggs, but these develop into young without ever being fertilized. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Parthenogenesis ("virgin birth"), the females produce eggs, but these develop into young without ever being fertilized. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Parthenogenesis ("virgin birth"), the females produce eggs, but these develop into young without ever being fertilized. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Parthenogenesis ("virgin birth"), the females produce eggs, but these develop into young without ever being fertilized. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Parthenogenesis ("virgin birth"), the females produce eggs, but these develop into young without ever being fertilized. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Parthenogenesis ("virgin birth"), the females produce eggs, but these develop into young without ever being fertilized. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Parthenogenesis ("virgin birth"), the females produce eggs, but these develop into young without ever being fertilized. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Many Echinoderms can shed a arm “comet” that can regrow the disc and further arms.

Learn more about asexual reproduction of plants and animals at… http://users.rcn.com/jkimball.ma.ultranet/BiologyPages/A/AsexualRe production.html

• You should be close to the middle of page 9 in your bundled homework. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Video Song Link! What do animals do? – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N3yHt7wBdOY

 Animals have three types of symmetry.  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Bilateral symmetry.  Same on both sides. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Bilateral symmetry.  Same on both sides. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Radial Symmetry. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Radial Symmetry.  Arranged equally in all directions from a central point. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Asymmetrical.  Having no symmetry. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Short article about animal symmetry at… http://www.decodedscience.com/animal-body-plans- symmetry-in-action/13171

• Quiz 1-10 Name the type of symmetry • Word bank: Bilateral, radial, asymmetrical. • ―Let’s do it with symbols‖ – One finger ―Index Please!‖ (Bilateral) – All five fingers (Radial) – Just a fist (asymmetrical) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Clam Open Clam Shut

Clam Open Clam Shut

Clam Open Clam Shut

Clam Open Clam Shut

• Bonus – Name this movie? ?

• Bonus –TWILIGHT?

• Bonus –TWILIGHT?

• You should be close to the bottom of page 9 in your bundled homework. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• You should be close to the bottom of page 9 in your bundled homework. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Name the type of symmetry

• You should be close to the bottom of page 9 in your bundled homework. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Name the type of symmetry

• You should be close to the bottom of page 9 in your bundled homework. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Name the type of symmetry

• You should be close to the bottom of page 9 in your bundled homework. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Name the type of symmetry

 New Area of Focus: Learning the Phylums and Animalia. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 New Area of Focus: Learning the Phylums and Animalia. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 New Area of Focus: Learning the Phylums and Animalia. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 New Area of Focus: Learning the Phylums and Animalia. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 New Area of Focus: Learning the Phylums and Animalia. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 New Area of Focus: Learning the Phylums and Animalia. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 New Area of Focus: Learning the Phylums and Animalia. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 New Area of Focus: Learning the Phylums and Animalia. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 New Area of Focus: Learning the Phylums and Animalia. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Goal, you can look at most any animal on the planet and be able to identify it to the phylum. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Goal, you can look at most any animal on the planet and be able to identify it to the phylum. – Instead of…‖Oh, a worm thing with eyes.‖ Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Goal, you can look at most any animal on the planet and be able to identify it to the phylum. – Instead of…‖Oh, a worm thing with eyes.‖ – ―This is a member of the Kingdom Animalia in the phylum Platyhelminthes commonly called a flatworm.‖ Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Important Note! This activity will be your best resource for the difficult graded recitation at the end of this unit. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Animals Available Sheet.

Chordata Record four large circles in journal. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Chordata Arthropoda Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Chordata Arthropoda Mollusca Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Chordata Arthropoda Mollusca Porifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Animals Available Sheet.

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata Nematoda Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata Nematoda Annelida Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata Nematoda Annelida Platyhelminthes Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata Nematoda Annelida Platyhelminthes Cnidaria Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata Nematoda Annelida Platyhelminthes Cnidaria Rotifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Activity! Visiting stations with different Phylums of Animalia. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Note: Teacher may have you look at specimen jars. Do not open containers. They are filled with ethyl alcohol to preserve specimens. Please handle with care as they are made of glass. Caution: Possibly Flammable.

• Activity! Visiting stations with different Phylums of Animalia. – Label the top of each Petri-dish with the Phylums name. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Activity! Visiting stations with different Phylums of Animalia. – Label the top of each Petri-dish with the Phylums name. – As a group, carefully visit the front of the room and collect a Phylum tray with info packet. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Activity! Visiting stations with different Phylums of Animalia. – Label the top of each Petri-dish with the Phylums name. – As a group, carefully visit the front of the room and collect a Phylum tray with info packet. – Sketch a few organisms within each phylum into the circles. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Activity! Visiting stations with different Phylums of Animalia. – Label the top of each Petri-dish with the Phylums name. – As a group, carefully visit the front of the room and collect a Phylum tray with info packet. – Sketch a few organisms within each phylum into the circles. – Read some information about each and include in or around circles. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Activity! Visiting stations with different Phylums of Animalia. – Label the top of each Petri-dish with the Phylums name. – As a group, carefully visit the front of the room and collect a Phylum tray with info packet. – Sketch a few organisms within each phylum into the circles. – Read some information about each and include in or around circles. – Record the type of symmetry. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Activity! Visiting stations with different Phylums of Animalia. – Label the top of each Petri-dish with the Phylums name. – As a group, carefully visit the front of the room and collect a Phylum tray with info packet. – Sketch a few organisms within each phylum into the circles. – Read some information about each and include in or around circles. – Record the type of symmetry. – Return tray with info packets neatly to the front. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Animals Available Sheet.

Chordata Arthropoda Mollusca Porifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Chordata Arthropoda Mollusca Porifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Chordata Arthropoda Mollusca Porifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Chordata Arthropoda Mollusca Porifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Chordata Arthropoda Mollusca Porifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Chordata Arthropoda Mollusca Porifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Chordata Arthropoda Mollusca Porifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Chordata Arthropoda Mollusca Porifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Chordata Arthropoda Mollusca Porifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Chordata Arthropoda Mollusca Porifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Chordata Arthropoda Mollusca Porifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Chordata Arthropoda Mollusca Porifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Chordata Arthropoda Mollusca Porifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Chordata Arthropoda Mollusca Porifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Chordata Arthropoda Mollusca Porifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Chordata Arthropoda Mollusca Porifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Chordata Arthropoda Mollusca Porifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Chiton

Chordata Arthropoda Mollusca Porifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Chordata Arthropoda Mollusca Porifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata Nematoda Annelida Platyhelminthes Cnidaria Rotifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata Nematoda Annelida Platyhelminthes Cnidaria Rotifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata Nematoda Annelida Platyhelminthes Cnidaria Rotifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata Nematoda Annelida Platyhelminthes Cnidaria Rotifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata Nematoda Annelida Platyhelminthes Cnidaria Rotifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Coral

Echinodermata Nematoda Annelida Platyhelminthes Cnidaria Rotifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Coral Anemone

Echinodermata Nematoda Annelida Platyhelminthes Cnidaria Rotifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata Nematoda Annelida Platyhelminthes Cnidaria Rotifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata Nematoda Annelida Platyhelminthes Cnidaria Rotifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata Nematoda Annelida Platyhelminthes Cnidaria Rotifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata Nematoda Annelida Platyhelminthes Cnidaria Rotifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata Nematoda Annelida Platyhelminthes Cnidaria Rotifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata Nematoda Annelida Platyhelminthes Cnidaria Rotifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata Nematoda Annelida Platyhelminthes Cnidaria Rotifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata Nematoda Annelida Platyhelminthes Cnidaria Rotifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata Nematoda Annelida Platyhelminthes Cnidaria Rotifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata Nematoda Annelida Platyhelminthes Cnidaria Rotifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata Nematoda Annelida Platyhelminthes Cnidaria Rotifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata Nematoda Annelida Platyhelminthes Cnidaria Rotifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata Nematoda Annelida Platyhelminthes Cnidaria Rotifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata Nematoda Annelida Platyhelminthes Cnidaria Rotifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Earthworm

• Common Phylums of the Kingdom Animalia. – - – - – - – - – - – - – - – - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Note – Not all of the Phylums of Animalia are covered. Much of the ―more common‖ life on Earth will fall into one of the Phylums covered. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Example: Hemichordata (Acorn worms) – The are not true chordates. – Learn more Hemichodata at.. – http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/chordata/hemicho rdata.html

• Which one is Hemichordata (Acorn worms and which is a plate of hot dogs?

• Which one is Hemichordata (Acorn worms and which is a plate of hot dogs?

• Which one is Hemichordata (Acorn worms and which is a plate of hot dogs?

• Which one is Hemichordata (Acorn worms and which is a plate of hot dogs?

Echinodermata Nematoda Annelida Platyhelminthes Cnidaria Rotifera Put any new information in circles Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Chordata Arthropoda Mollusca Porifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Animals Available Sheet.

• The Lophotrochozoa comprise one of the major groups within the animal kingdom. – Molluscs and worms – Belongs to a larger group within the Animalia called the Bilateria, because they are bilaterally symmetrical with a left and a right side to their bodies.

• The Lophotrochozoa comprise one of the major groups within the animal kingdom. – Molluscs and worms – Belongs to a larger group within the Animalia called the Bilateria, because they are bilaterally symmetrical with a left and a right side to their bodies.

 Phylum Mollusca Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Phylum Mollusca  Soft bodies and some have shells. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Octopus and Squid are also Mollusks. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Sea slugs belong to the Phylum Mollusca.

Learn more about the Phylum Mollusca at… http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/taxa/inverts/mollusca/mollusca.php

• Animals Available Sheet.

• Metazoan animals: They are multicellular, mitochondrial eukaryotes with differentiated tissues, including nerves and muscles. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Metazoan animals: They are multicellular, mitochondrial eukaryotes with differentiated tissues, including nerves and muscles. – They evolved from the protists approximately 700 million years ago. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Metazoan animals: They are multicellular, mitochondrial eukaryotes with differentiated tissues, including nerves and muscles. – They evolved from the protists approximately 700 million years ago. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Are we related to this echinoderm? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Echinoderms and humans are both in Deuterostomia which comprise one of the major groups within the animal kingdom. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Echinoderms and humans are both in Deuterostomia which comprise one of the major groups within the animal kingdom. – We are both bilateral in our symmetry • Echinoderms begin life bilateral and then switch to radial symmetry. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Deuterostomia "Your mouth comes second.‖ Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Deuterostomia "Your mouth comes second.‖ – Deuterostomia develop a layer of cells where the anus forms and then later comes the mouth . Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Phylum Echinodermata - Spiny skinned organisms. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Phylum Echinodermata - Spiny skinned organisms. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Phylum Echinodermata - Spiny skinned organisms.  Radial symmetry Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata Nematoda Annelida Platyhelminthes Cnidaria Rotifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• A sea cucumber belongs to the Phylum Echinodermata. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• A sea cucumber belongs to the Phylum Echinodermata. – How is it different than the sea slug which belongs to Mollusca? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Which picture below is in the Phylum Mollusca, and which is in the Phylum Echinodermata? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Which picture below is in the Phylum Mollusca, and which is in the Phylum Echinodermata? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Phylum Echinodermata Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Phylum Echinodermata Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Phylum Echinodermata Phylum Molluska Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Phylum Echinodermata Phylum Molluska Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Learn more about Echinodermata at… http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/accounts/Echinoder mata/

• Animals Available Sheet.

Echinodermata Nematoda Annelida Platyhelminthes Cnidaria Rotifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Coral Anemone

 Phylum Cnidaria – Stinging cells. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Phylum Cnidaria – Stinging cells.  Silent C (ni dérree ən). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Phylum Cnidaria – Stinging cells.  Silent C (ni dérree ən).  Radial symmetry. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Phylum Cnidaria – Stinging cells.  Silent C (ni dérree ən).  Radial symmetry. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Phylum Cnidaria: – Jellyfish is a misnomer.

• Phylum Cnidaria: – Jellyfish is a misnomer. They are not fish and do not even have a backbone.

• Phylum Cnidaria: – Jellyfish is a misnomer. They are not fish and do not even have a backbone. – They have roamed the seas for over 500 million years (oldest multi-cellular creature)

Jellies don’t have a brain, central nervous system, circulatory system, respiratory system, excretory system, and they have an incomplete digestive system.

Bud

• Two layers of cells. – The outer layer is known as the ectoderm or epidermis. – Layer in the middle is jelly. – Inner layer is known as the endoderm or gastrodermis Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Two layers of cells. – The outer layer is known as the ectoderm or epidermis. – Layer in the middle is jelly. – Inner layer is known as the endoderm or gastrodermis. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Two layers of cells. – The outer layer is known as the ectoderm or epidermis. – Layer in the middle is jelly. – Inner layer is known as the endoderm or gastrodermis. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Two layers of cells. – The outer layer is known as the ectoderm or epidermis. – Layer in the middle is jelly. – Inner layer is known as the endoderm or gastrodermis. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Two layers of cells. – The outer layer is known as the ectoderm or epidermis. – Layer in the middle is jelly. Noncellular substance known as mesoglea – Inner layer is known as the endoderm or gastrodermis Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Very diverse phylum. – Anthozoa (true coral, sea anemones, sea pens) 6000 spp – Cubozoa (box jellyfish) 20 spp – Hydrozoa (freshwater hydra, fire coral) 3000 spp – Scyphozoa (true jellyfish) 200 spp Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Very diverse phylum. – Anthozoa (true coral, sea anemones, sea pens) 6000 spp – Cubozoa (box jellyfish) 20 spp – Hydrozoa (freshwater hydra, fire coral) 3000 spp – Scyphozoa (true jellyfish) 200 spp Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Very diverse phylum. – Anthozoa (true coral, sea anemones, sea pens) 6000 spp – Cubozoa (box jellyfish) 20 spp – Hydrozoa (freshwater hydra, fire coral) 3000 spp – Scyphozoa (true jellyfish) 200 spp Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Very diverse phylum. – Anthozoa (true coral, sea anemones, sea pens) 6000 spp – Cubozoa (box jellyfish) 20 spp – Hydrozoa (freshwater hydra, fire coral) 3000 spp – Scyphozoa (true jellyfish) 200 spp Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Which is a… – Coral (Anthozoa) – Box Jelly (Cuboza) – Hydra (Hydrozoa) – True Jelly (Scyphozoa)

• Which is a… – Coral (Anthozoa) – Box Jelly (Cuboza) – Hydra (Hydrozoa) – True Jelly (Scyphozoa)

• Which is a… – Coral (Anthozoa) – Box Jelly (Cuboza) – Hydra (Hydrozoa) – True Jelly (Scyphozoa) True

• Which is a… – Coral (Anthozoa) – Box Jelly (Cuboza) – Hydra (Hydrozoa) – True Jelly (Scyphozoa) True

• Which is a… – Coral (Anthozoa) – Box Jelly (Cuboza) – Hydra (Hydrozoa) – True Jelly (Scyphozoa) True Box

• Which is a… – Coral (Anthozoa) – Box Jelly (Cuboza) – Hydra (Hydrozoa) – True Jelly (Scyphozoa) True Box

• Which is a… – Coral (Anthozoa) – Box Jelly (Cuboza) – Hydra (Hydrozoa) – True Jelly (Scyphozoa) True Box Coral

• Which is a… – Coral (Anthozoa) – Box Jelly (Cuboza) – Hydra (Hydrozoa) – True Jelly (Scyphozoa) True Box Coral

• Which is a… – Coral (Anthozoa) – Box Jelly (Cuboza) – Hydra (Hydrozoa) – True Jelly (Scyphozoa) True Box Coral Hydra

• Which is a… – Coral (Anthozoa) – Box Jelly (Cuboza) – Hydra (Hydrozoa) – True Jelly (Scyphozoa)

• Which is a… – Coral (Anthozoa) – Box Jelly (Cuboza) – Hydra (Hydrozoa) – True Jelly (Scyphozoa)

• Which is a… – Coral (Anthozoa) – Box Jelly (Cuboza) – Hydra (Hydrozoa) – True Jelly (Scyphozoa) Hydra

• Which is a… – Coral (Anthozoa) – Box Jelly (Cuboza) – Hydra (Hydrozoa) – True Jelly (Scyphozoa) Hydra Bud

• Which is a… – Coral (Anthozoa) – Box Jelly (Cuboza) – Hydra (Hydrozoa) – True Jelly (Scyphozoa) Hydra Bud

• Which is a… – Coral (Anthozoa) – Box Jelly (Cuboza) – Hydra (Hydrozoa) – True Jelly (Scyphozoa) Hydra Bud Corals and Anemones

• Which is a… – Coral (Anthozoa) – Box Jelly (Cuboza) – Hydra (Hydrozoa) – True Jelly (Scyphozoa) Hydra Bud Corals and Anemones

• Which is a… – Coral (Anthozoa) – Box Jelly (Cuboza) – Hydra (Hydrozoa) – True Jelly (Scyphozoa) Hydra Bud Corals and Anemones True Jelly

• Which is a… – Coral (Anthozoa) – Box Jelly (Cuboza) – Hydra (Hydrozoa) – True Jelly (Scyphozoa) Hydra Bud Corals and Anemones True Jelly

• Which is a… – Coral (Anthozoa) – Box Jelly (Cuboza) – Hydra (Hydrozoa) – True Jelly (Scyphozoa) Hydra Bud Corals and Anemones True Jelly Box Jelly

What do you think?

Hoax Alert!

“Be aware of hoaxes on the net.”

“Still a large Cnidarian however”

“Still a large Cnidarian however” Learn more about the Phylum Cnidaria at… http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/cnidaria/cnidaria.html

• Comb Jellies belong to a different Phylum called Ctenophora. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Comb Jellies belong to a different Phylum called Ctenophora. – They are shaped differently and have cilia to propel themselves. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Animals Available Sheet.

Echinodermata Nematoda Annelida Platyhelminthes Cnidaria Rotifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Coral Anemone Ctenophora Comb Jelly’s

• Urochordata: ―Sea squirts‖ – Has primitive notochord

• Video Link. Cnidaria and Ctenophora – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3HzFiQFF QYw

• Animals Available Sheet.

Chordata Arthropoda Mollusca Porifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Phylum Porifera – Sponges

 Phylum Porifera – Sponges  Asymmetrical.

• Video! Sea Sponge filter feeding. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T7E1rq7zHLc Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Learn more about Porifera / spnges at… http://www.enchantedlearning.com/subjects/invertebrates/sponge/

Echinodermata Nematoda Annelida Platyhelminthes Cnidaria Rotifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Animals Available Sheet.

 Phylum Rotifera  Wheeled organisms Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Phylum Rotifera  Wheeled organisms  (Draw in journal somewhere on page). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Phylum Rotifera  Wheeled organisms  (Draw in journal somewhere on page). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Learn more about Rotifera at… http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/phyla/rotifera/rotifera.html

• Rotifers are great for eating human waste / sludge in waste water treatment plants.

• Video! Rotifer Feeding – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fe7GAn8ZCz0

• Animals Available Sheet.

Echinodermata Nematoda Annelida Platyhelminthes Cnidaria Rotifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• There are three types of worms – Flatworms – Roundworms – Segmented worms

• There are three types of worms – Flatworms? – Roundworms? – Segmented worms?

• There are three types of worms – Flatworms? – Roundworms? – Segmented worms?

• There are three types of worms – Flatworms? – Roundworms? – Segmented worms?

• There are three types of worms – Flatworms? – Roundworms? – Segmented worms?

• There are three types of worms – Flatworms? – Roundworms? – Segmented worms?

• There are three types of worms – Flatworms? – Roundworms? – Segmented worms?ented wor

• There are three types of worms – Flatworms? – Roundworms? – Segmented worms?ented wor

• Worms are very old.

• Worms are very old. – Many fossils are dated back to the Cambrian, hundreds of millions of years ago.

 Phylum Nematoda  The Roundworms. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata Nematoda Annelida Platyhelminthes Cnidaria Rotifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• No joke, this is the mouth of a parasitic nematode that lives in your intestine and is common to almost all humans.

• Nematodes have a round body cavity. Learn more about Nematoda at… http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/accounts/Nematoda/

 Phylum Platyhelminthes. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Phylum Platyhelminthes.  The Flatworms. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Echinodermata Nematoda Annelida Platyhelminthes Cnidaria Rotifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Flatworms (Platyhelminthes) eat and release waste from the same opening. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Flatworms (Platyhelminthes) eat and release waste from the same opening. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Learn more about the Phylum Platyhelminthes at… http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/accounts/Platy helminthes/

Echinodermata Nematoda Annelida Platyhelminthes Cnidaria Rotifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Phylum Annelida Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Phylum Annelida  The segmented worms. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Video! Annelida (Leech Therapy) – Caution! If you don’t like leeches, you won’t like this news clip. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bYeqPvv5s_E Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Video Link! Leeches NOVA podcast – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cKUAroimQrk Learn more about Annelida at… http://www.earthlife.net/inverts/annelida.html

• Animals Available Sheet.

 Phylum Arthropoda Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Phylum Arthropoda  Segmented joints, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Phylum Arthropoda  Segmented joints, exoskeleton, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Phylum Arthropoda  Segmented joints, exoskeleton, Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Exoskeleton: An external skeleton that supports and protects an animal's body

 Phylum Arthropoda  Segmented joints, exoskeleton, bilateral symmetry. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Statistics vary, but millions and millions of Arthropod species exist. They outnumber all other phylums of animals combined. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Statistics vary, but millions and millions of Arthropod species exist. They outnumber all other phylums of animals combined. – The Class Insecta represents 90% of all known species. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Arthropods are some of the smallest members of the Kingdom Animalia. – Such as this member of the family Eriophyid Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 The Classes of the Phylum Arthropoda.  -  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Class Insecta  6 legs.  3 body parts.  Head, thorax, abdomen.  Compound eyes.  2 antennae.  Only flying arthropod. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Class Insecta  6 legs.  3 body parts.  Head, thorax, abdomen.  Compound eyes.  2 antennae.  Only flying arthropod. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Class Insecta  6 legs.  3 body parts.  Head, thorax, abdomen.  Compound eyes.  2 antennae.  Only flying arthropod. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Class Insecta  6 legs.  3 body parts.  Head, thorax, abdomen.  Compound eyes.  2 antennae.  Only flying arthropod. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Class Insecta  6 legs.  3 body parts.  Head, thorax, abdomen.  Compound eyes.  2 antennae.  Only flying arthropod. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Class Insecta  6 legs.  3 body parts.  Head, thorax, abdomen.  Compound eyes.  2 antennae.  Only flying arthropod. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Class Insecta  6 legs.  3 body parts.  Head, thorax, abdomen.  Compound eyes.  2 antennae.  Only flying arthropod. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Class Insecta  6 legs.  3 body parts.  Head, thorax, abdomen.  Compound eyes.  2 antennae.  Only flying arthropod. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Class Insecta  6 legs.  3 body parts.  Head, thorax, abdomen.  Compound eyes.  2 antennae.  Only flying arthropod. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Class Insecta  6 legs.  3 body parts.  Head, thorax, abdomen.  Compound eyes.  2 antennae.  Only flying arthropod. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Class Insecta  6 legs.  3 body parts.  Head, thorax, abdomen.  Compound eyes.  2 antennae.  Only flying arthropod. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Class Insecta  6 legs.  3 body parts.  Head, thorax, abdomen.  Compound eyes.  2 antennae.  Only flying arthropod. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Class Insecta  6 legs.  3 body parts.  Head, thorax, abdomen.  Compound eyes.  2 antennae.  Only flying arthropod. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Class Insecta  6 legs.  3 body parts.  Head, thorax, abdomen.  Compound eyes.  2 antennae.  Only flying arthropod. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Learn more about Insecta at… http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/accounts/Insecta/

• Which specimen below is not in the Class Insecta? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Answer- Tick, It has 8 legs and two body parts, no antennae, no wings - Arachnida Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Insects are believed by many scientists to be the most successful organisms on the planet.

• Which is a reason why insects are some of the most successful species on the planet? A.) They have been around for the last 400 millions years. B.) They survive in every environment on Earth. • Can survive extreme heat and drought. C.) They can multiply rapidly laying thousands of eggs. D.) They work all day in complex groups such as ants (without complaining). E.) 8 out of every 10 species on Earth is an insect. F.) All of the above. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Which is a reason why insects are some of the most successful species on the planet? A.) They have been around for the last 400 million years. B.) They survive in every environment on Earth. • Can survive extreme heat and drought. C.) They can multiply rapidly laying thousands of eggs. D.) They work all day in complex groups such as ants (without complaining). E.) 8 out of every 10 species on Earth is an insect. F.) All of the above. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Which is a reason why insects are some of the most successful species on the planet? A.) They have been around for the last 400 million years. B.) They survive in every environment on Earth. • Can survive extreme heat and drought. C.) They can multiply rapidly laying thousands of eggs. D.) They work all day in complex groups such as ants (without complaining). E.) 8 out of every 10 species on Earth is an insect. F.) All of the above. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Which is a reason why insects are some of the most successful species on the planet? A.) They have been around for the last 400 million years. B.) They survive in every environment on Earth. • Can survive extreme heat and drought. C.) They can multiply rapidly laying thousands of eggs. D.) They work all day in complex groups such as ants (without complaining). E.) 8 out of every 10 species on Earth is an insect. F.) All of the above. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Which is a reason why insects are some of the most successful species on the planet? A.) They have been around for the last 400 million years. B.) They survive in every environment on Earth. • Can survive extreme heat and drought. C.) They can multiply rapidly laying thousands of eggs. D.) They work all day in complex groups such as ants (without complaining). E.) 8 out of every 10 species on Earth is an insect. F.) All of the above. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Which is a reason why insects are some of the most successful species on the planet? A.) They have been around for the last 400 million years. B.) They survive in every environment on Earth. • Can survive extreme heat and drought. C.) They can multiply rapidly laying thousands of eggs. D.) They work all day in complex groups such as ants (without complaining). E.) 8 out of every 10 species on Earth is an insect. F.) All of the above. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Which is a reason why insects are some of the most successful species on the planet? A.) They have been around for the last 400 million years. B.) They survive in every environment on Earth. • Can survive extreme heat and drought. C.) They can multiply rapidly laying thousands of eggs. D.) They work all day in complex groups such as ants (without complaining). E.) 8 out of every 10 species on Earth is an insect. F.) All of the above. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Which is a reason why insects are some of the most successful species on the planet? A.) They have been around for the last 400 million years. B.) They survive in every environment on Earth. • Can survive extreme heat and drought. C.) They can multiply rapidly laying thousands of eggs. D.) They work all day in complex groups such as ants (without complaining). E.) 8 out of every 10 species on Earth is an insect. F.) All of the above. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Largest Insect (Some Debate) – The Weta Bug (Deinacrida carinata)

 Class Crustacea  Head and abdomen  Some have many legs (8+) with many jobs.  Most are aquatic Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Class Crustacea  Head and abdomen  Some have many legs (8+) with many jobs.  Most are aquatic Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Class Crustacea  Head and abdomen  Some have many legs (8+) with many jobs.  Most are aquatic Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Class Crustacea  Head and abdomen  Some have many legs (8+) with many jobs.  Most are aquatic Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Coconut crab (Birgus latro) largest terrestrial arthropod / Crustacean. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• The Alaskan King Crab (Paralithodes camtschaticus). – The largest known aquatic arthropod / crustacean. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Learn more about Crustacea at… http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/accounts/Crustacea

• The single animal species that makes up the most biomass is a crustacean called the copepod. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• The single animal species that makes up the most biomass is a crustacean called the copepod. – If you weighed all the elephants in the world, they wouldn’t even move the scale compared to all of the copepods. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• .Student needed to stand here

• .Student needed to stand here

 Class Arachnida  8 legs.  No antennae or wings.  Two body parts.  Head and sensory.  Abdomen.  Most live on land. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Class Arachnida  8 legs.  No antennae or wings.  Two body parts.  Head and sensory.  Abdomen.  Most live on land. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Class Arachnida  8 legs.  No antennae or wings.  Two body parts.  Head and sensory.  Abdomen.  Most live on land. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Class Arachnida  8 legs.  No antennae or wings.  Two body parts.  Head and sensory.  Abdomen.  Most live on land. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Class Arachnida  8 legs.  No antennae or wings.  Two body parts.  Head and sensory.  Abdomen.  Most live on land. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Class Arachnida  8 legs.  No antennae or wings.  Two body parts.  Head and sensory.  Abdomen.  Most live on land. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Class Arachnida  8 legs.  No antennae or wings.  Two body parts.  Head and sensory.  Abdomen.  Most live on land. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Class Arachnida  8 legs.  No antennae or wings.  Two body parts.  Head and sensory.  Abdomen.  Most live on land. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Class Arachnida  8 legs.  No antennae or wings.  Two body parts.  Head and sensory.  Abdomen.  Most live on land. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Class Arachnida  8 legs.  No antennae or wings.  Two body parts.  Head and sensory.  Abdomen.  Most live on land. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Class Arachnida  8 legs.  No antennae or wings.  Two body parts.  Head and sensory.  Abdomen.  Most live on land. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Class Arachnida  8 legs.  No antennae or wings.  Two body parts.  Head and sensory.  Abdomen.  Most live on land. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Class Arachnida  8 legs.  No antennae or wings.  Two body parts.  Head and sensory.  Abdomen.  Most live on land. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Mites are the most diverse Arachnid. – Picture of dust mites on dust and carpet. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Spiders are the second most diverse class of Arachnids. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Some Arachnida make webs to catch their prey. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Some Arachnida make webs to catch their prey. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Video! Spider Web Construction – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eb6bqIWdQao

• Video! Time lapse of a spider making a web. (30 seconds) – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qg8xFx7rl Rg&feature=fvst

• Ticks and Scorpions are also Arachnids. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Learn more (lots of pictures) at… http://animal.discovery.com/arachnids

 Sub Phylum Myriapoda (In Arthropoda)  Head and trunk  Many legs per segment  No wings  Antennae Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Sub Phylum Myriapoda (In Arthropoda)  Head and trunk  Many legs per segment  No wings  Antennae Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Sub Phylum Myriapoda (In Arthropoda)  Head and trunk  Many legs per segment  No wings  Antennae Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Sub Phylum Myriapoda (In Arthropoda)  Head and trunk  Many legs per segment  No wings  Antennae Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Sub Phylum Myriapoda (In Arthropoda)  Head and trunk  Many legs per segment  No wings  Antennae Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Sub Phylum Myriapoda (In Arthropoda)  Head and trunk  Many legs per segment  No wings  Antennae Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Sub Phylum Myriapoda (In Arthropoda)  Head and trunk  Many legs per segment  No wings  Antennae Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Sub Phylum Myriapoda (In Arthropoda)  Head and trunk  Many legs per segment  No wings  Antennae Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Sub Phylum Myriapoda (In Arthropoda)  Head and trunk  Many legs per segment  No wings  Antennae Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Sub Phylum Myriapoda (In Arthropoda)  Head and trunk  Many legs per segment  No wings  2 Antennae Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Centipedes – Class Chilopoda Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Millipedes – Class Spirobolida

• Millipedes – Class Spirobolida

• Which is in the Class Insecta, and which is in the Class Arachnida? Why? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Which is in the Class Insecta, and which is in the Class Arachnida? Why? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Arachnida Insecta 8 legs, 2 body parts 6 legs, 3 body parts Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Arachnida Insecta 8 legs, 2 body parts 6 legs, 3 body parts Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Arachnida Insecta 8 legs, 2 body parts 6 legs, 3 body parts Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Which is in the class Insecta, and which is in the class Crustacea? Why? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Which is in the class Insecta, and which is in the class Crustacea? Why? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Insecta Crustacea 6 legs, wings. 8+ legs, aquatic. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Insecta Crustacea 6 legs, wings. 8+ legs, aquatic. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Insecta Crustacea 6 legs, wings. 8+ legs, aquatic. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• What class of Arthropoda is the specimen below? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Answer! Class Arachnida. – (Galeodes arabs) aka… Camel Spider Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Camel Spider – Not a true spider, related to ticks and scorpions in an order called Solifugae.

No venom, they just use their pinchers and brute, gory force.

Lizard in the Order Squamata

• What Class of Arthropoda is the specimen below? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Answer! Class Arachnida. 8 legs, two body parts, no antennae, no wings. - Mite Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• What Class of Arthropoda is the specimen below?

• Answer! Class Crustacea, 8+ specialized legs, aquatic.

• What Sub-Phylum of arthropods does this specimen belong to? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Answer! Sub-Phylum Myriapoda – Class Chilopoda Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Which specimen is in the class Arachnida, and which is in the class Chilopoda? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Which specimen is in the class Arachnida, and which is in the class Chilopoda? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Chilopoda Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Chilopoda Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Chilopoda Arachnida Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• What class of Arthropoda would this specimen belong to? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Answer! Class: Arachnida –Order: Pseudoscorpiones Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Video! (Optional) Really cool image of a Pseudoscorpion. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2S3ATMgy270 Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Activity! Looking at pond water to identify phylum of animals. – Make three circles with a Petri-dish. – Make a wet-mount slide with one drop of pond water (get a chunk from the sample) – Draw a specimen in your circle and try to identify it. (You may see a Protist). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Activity! Looking at pond water to identify phylum of animals. – Make three circles with a Petri-dish. – Make a wet-mount slide with one drop of pond water (get a chunk from the sample) – Draw a specimen in your circle and try to identify it. (You may see a Protist). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Animals Available Sheet.

Chordata Arthropoda Mollusca Porifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Chordata  Having a backbone or notocord. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Chordata  Having a backbone or notocord. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Chordata  Having a backbone or notocord. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Picture of Lanclet Subphylum - Cephalochordata (Branchiostoma lanceolatum) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Myxini: (Hagfish) Hagfish have three accessory hearts, no cerebrum or cerebellum, no jaws or stomach.

• Myxini: (Hagfish) Hagfish have three accessory hearts, no cerebrum or cerebellum, no jaws or stomach.

• Myxini: (Hagfish) Hagfish have three accessory hearts, no cerebrum or cerebellum, no jaws or stomach.

• Sea Squirt: (Urochordata)

• Sea Squirt: (Urochordata) – In its larvae stage it has all chordate characteristics: it has a notochord, a dorsal nerve cord.

• Fossil of early backboned organisms dating 560 million years ago. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy Learn more about the Phylum Chordata at… http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/accounts/Chordata/

 Classes of Vertebrata (The Big 5)  -  -  -  -  -Fish (Basal vertebrates)  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Chordata Arthropoda Mollusca Porifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Picture of fossil and recreation of an early amphibian. – Note location of where the fossil was found. Amphibians don’t inhabit this colder area (Evidence of continental drift). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• The Coelacanth.

• The Coelacanth. – Believed to have gone extinct with dinosaurs.

• The Coelacanth. – Believed to have gone extinct with dinosaurs. – Rediscovered (living) in 1938 off the coast of South Africa.

• The lobe-finned fish are thought to be the start of the terrestrial (land) animals.

• The lobe-finned fish are thought to be the start of the terrestrial (land) animals. – Picture of lung fish moving across the mud.

• The lobe-finned fish are thought to be the start of the terrestrial (land) animals. – Picture of lung fish moving across the mud.

• The lobe-finned fish are thought to be the start of the terrestrial (land) animals. – Picture of lung fish moving across the mud.

• The lobe-finned fish are thought to be the start of the terrestrial (land) animals. – Picture of lung fish moving across the mud.

• The lobe-finned fish are thought to be the start of the terrestrial (land) animals. – Picture of lung fish moving across the mud.

• The lobe-finned fish are thought to be the start of the terrestrial (land) animals. – Picture of lung fish moving across the mud.

• The lobe-finned fish are thought to be the start of the terrestrial (land) animals. – Picture of lung fish moving across the mud.

• The lobe-finned fish are thought to be the start of the terrestrial (land) animals. – Picture of lung fish moving across the mud.

• The lobe-finned fish are thought to be the start of the terrestrial (land) animals. – Picture of lung fish moving across the mud. “What we call arms were once legs.” “We are tetrapods.”

• One theory suggests that land animals developed when smaller bodies of water periodically dried up.

• One theory suggests that land animals developed when smaller bodies of water periodically dried up. – Being able to crawl from one pool to the next aided in survival.

• One theory suggests that land animals developed when smaller bodies of water periodically dried up. – Being able to crawl from one pool to the next aided in survival. – This ability was passed on from one generation to the next.

• Another theory

• Another theory – Lunged gulping fish could to avoid predation in the aquatic habitats by climbing into the shallows and then eventually the land. Learn more about lobe finned fish and tetrapod evolution at… http://dinosaurs.about.com/od/otherprehistoriclife/a/tetrapods.htm

• Which picture below is a tetrapod?

• Which picture below is a tetrapod?

• Which picture below is a tetrapod?

• Which picture below is a tetrapod?

• Which picture below is a tetrapod?

• Which picture below is a tetrapod?

• Which picture below is a tetrapod?

• Which picture below is a tetrapod?

• Which picture below is a tetrapod?

• Which picture below is a tetrapod?

• Which picture below is a tetrapod?

• Which picture below is a tetrapod?

• Which picture below is a tetrapod?

• Which picture below is a tetrapod?

• Which picture below is a tetrapod?

• Which picture below is a tetrapod?

• What type of snake is this? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• What type of snake is this? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• This is not a snake, it’s a skink. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• This is not a snake, it’s a skink. – An example of intermediate species between lizards and snakes. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Many Pythons (snakes) have spurs (toenails) from when they use to have legs. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Many Pythons (snakes) have spurs (toenails) from when they use to have legs. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Many Pythons (snakes) have spurs (toenails) from when they use to have legs. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• This is a human tailbone. This is an example of a vestigial structure. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• This is a human tailbone. This is an example of a vestigial structure. – Picture on right is human embryo. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Classes of Vertebrata (The Big 5)  -  -  -  -  -Fish (Basal vertebrates)  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Classes of Vertebrata (The Big 5)  -  -  -  -  -Fish (Basal vertebrates)  -  -  - Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Chordata Arthropoda Mollusca Porifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Diapsida: Reptiles, Dinosaurs, Birds. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Class Reptilia (Diapsida): Have scales. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Class Reptilia (Diapsida): Have scales. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Order Squamata: Lizards, snakes and amphisbaenids – About 7,900 species Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Video Link! Cobra vs. Mongoose • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vdg9gk mWsEA&feature=relmfu

• Picture of Amphisbaenids…aka ―Worm Lizards‖ Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Picture of a horned toad (Phrynosoma hernandesi) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Picture of a horned toad (Phrynosoma hernandesi) – It can shoot blood out of it’s eye to confuse predators. Blood contains some mild toxins. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Picture of the ―Jesus Lizard‖ (Basiliscus Plumifrons) – Running on water helps it avoid predators. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QK9mcn0Bnfg &feature=related Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Order: Sphenodontia - Tuataras from New Zealand: – 2 species Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Archosauria: Birds, Learn more at… http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/diapsids/archosauria.html

• Archosauria: Birds, dinosaurs, Learn more at… http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/diapsids/archosauria.html

• Archosauria: Birds, dinosaurs, and crocodiles Learn more at… http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/diapsids/archosauria.html

• Archosauria: Birds, dinosaurs, and crocodiles Learn more at… http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/diapsids/archosauria.html

• Order Crocodilla - Crocodiles, gharials, caimans and alligators: – 23 species Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Gharials are like alligators but have a long thin snout. – They are found in Northern India. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Alligator: – Picture of The American Alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Anapsida -Turtles and tortoises: – Approximately 300 species Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Reptiles generally lay eggs such as this sea turtle (Dermochelys coriacea). Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Sphenodontidae: The tuatara is the only species of sphenodontid alive today.

Chordata Arthropoda Mollusca Porifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Class Amphibia: Double Life – Land and water. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Class Amphibia: Double Life – Land and water. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Amphibia have a double life because… Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Amphibia have a double life because… – They live in the water and then on land. • Lose tail and grow legs. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Amphibia have a double life because… – They live in the water and then on land. • Lose tail and grow legs. – They breathe with gills and then lungs. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Amphibians usually lay jelly-like eggs in water. – Eggs have a larval stage Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Order Anura – Frogs and Toads

• Order Anura – Frogs and Toads – Have four limbs

• Order Anura – Frogs and Toads – Have four limbs – Some are vocal.

• Is this a frog or a toad? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Answer! All toads are frogs. (Family Bufonidae) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Answer! All toads are frogs. (Family Bufonidae) – The class that includes toads have more stubby legs. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Answer! All toads are frogs. (Family Bufonidae) – The class that includes toads have more stubby legs. – Drier and warty skin. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Answer! All toads are frogs. (Family Bufonidae) – The class that includes toads have more stubby legs. – Drier and warty skin. – Poison glands behind eyes Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Answer! All toads are frogs. (Family Bufonidae) – The class that includes toads have more stubby legs. – Drier and warty skin. – Poison glands behind eyes – Eggs laid in a chain not a clutch. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

“My name is

“My name is Toad, but I think it comes from toadstools which are Fungus and not amphibians”

• Order Caudata: Salamanders – Bearing a tail. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Picture of Giant Salamander (Andrias davidianus) – Lives in mountain rivers of China. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Order Apoda: Caecilians – Without legs – Subterranean diggers Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Rudimentary Eyes

• Video Caecilians. – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DMvL4zOL SeM

• Which organisms below are members of the class Amphibia?

• Which organisms below are members of the class Amphibia?

• Which organisms below are members of the class Amphibia?

• Which organisms below are members of the class Amphibia?

• Which organisms below are members of the class Amphibia?

• Which organisms below are members of the class Amphibia?

• Which organisms below are members of the class Amphibia?

• Which organisms below are members of the class Amphibia?

• Which organisms below are members of the class Amphibia?

• Which organisms below are members of the class Amphibia?

• Which organisms below are members of the class Amphibia?

• Which organisms below are members of the class Amphibia?

• Which organisms below are members of the class Amphibia?

They don’t exist and have never existed.

• The Komodo Dragon doesn’t breathe fire and fly. – Another cheesy common name. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• The Komodo Dragon doesn’t breathe fire and fly. – Another cheesy common name. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Any guesses to what the common names are for the Class Aves and Actinopterygii in the Phylum Chordata. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Aves Actinopterygi (Lobed fish) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Aves Actinopterygi (Lobed fish) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Aves Actinopterygi (Lobed fish) Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

Chordata Arthropoda Mollusca Porifera Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

 Class Aves: Feathers, bills, wishbone Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Aves also have – Lightweight bones. – N teeth. – Produce large eggs. – Many can navigate well. – Song production. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Aves also have – Lightweight bones. – No teeth. – Produce large eggs. – Many can navigate well. – Song production. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Aves also have – Lightweight bones. – No teeth. – Produce large eggs. – Many can navigate well. – Song production. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Aves also have – Lightweight bones. – No teeth. – Produce large eggs. – Many can navigate well. – Song production. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Aves also have – Lightweight bones. – No teeth. – Produce large eggs. – Many can navigate well. – Song production. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Aves also have – Lightweight bones. – No teeth. – Produce large eggs. – Many can navigate well. – Song production. Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Aves (birds) evolved from reptiles…

• Birds can be very small and fly.

• Birds can be very large and non flying.

• Superorder Palaeognathae – ―Old jaws" More primitive and reptilian palate than that in other birds.

• Superorder Palaeognathae – ―Old jaws" More primitive and reptilian palate than that in other birds. • Struthioniformes:

• Superorder Palaeognathae – ―Old jaws" More primitive and reptilian palate than that in other birds. • Struthioniformes: ostriches,

• Superorder Palaeognathae – ―Old jaws" More primitive and reptilian palate than that in other birds. • Struthioniformes: ostriches, emus,

• Superorder Palaeognathae – ―Old jaws" More primitive and reptilian palate than that in other birds. • Struthioniformes: ostriches, emus, kiwis.

• Superorder Palaeognathae – ―Old jaws" More primitive and reptilian palate than that in other birds. • Struthioniformes: ostriches, emus, kiwis. • Tinamiformes: tinamous

• Tinamiformes: tinamous

• Superorder Neognathae: – Ten thousand species. – Many sizes and shapes (bills and feet) • Orders • Anseriformes—waterfowl • Galliformes—fowl • Charadriiformes—gulls, button-quails, plovers and allies • Gaviiformes—loons • Podicipediformes—grebes • Procellariiformes—albatrosses, petrels, and allies • Sphenisciformes—penguins • Pelecaniformes—pelicans and allies • Phaethontiformes—tropicbirds • Ciconiiformes—storks and allies • Cathartiformes—New World vultures • Phoenicopteriformes—flamingos • Falconiformes—falcons, eagles, hawks and allies • Gruiformes—cranes and allies • Pteroclidiformes—sandgrouse • Columbiformes—doves and pigeons • Psittaciformes—parrots and allies • Cuculiformes—cuckoos and turacos • Opisthocomiformes—hoatzin • Strigiformes—owls • Caprimulgiformes—nightjars and allies • Apodiformes—swifts and hummingbirds • Coraciiformes—kingfishers and allies • Piciformes—woodpeckers and allies • Trogoniformes—trogons • Coliiformes—mousebirds • Passeriformes—passerines

• Activity! Bird Structure Function and Survival by investigating beak type and foot type. – Each table group gets a token and a white board + dry erase marker – Guess right and keep your token, guess wrong and lose it. Who will survive to the end? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Which bird will be best at surviving by breaking tough seeds? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Which bird will be best at surviving by breaking tough seeds? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Which bird will be best at surviving by catching fish from the air? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Which bird will be best at surviving by catching fish from the air? Copyright © 2010 Ryan P. Murphy

• Which bird will be best at surviving b

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