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International Aid Effectiveness Agenda 5 April 200

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Information about International Aid Effectiveness Agenda 5 April 200
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Published on October 31, 2007

Author: Haralda

Source: authorstream.com

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HARMONIZATION, ALIGNMENT AND MANAGING FOR RESULTS – LESSONS AT THE INTERNATIONAL LEVEL:  HARMONIZATION, ALIGNMENT AND MANAGING FOR RESULTS – LESSONS AT THE INTERNATIONAL LEVEL Joyce K. G. Mapunjo, Commissioner for External Finance, Ministry of Finance, Tanzania Presentation Outline:  Presentation Outline Introduction Millennium Development Goals Monterrey Consensus on Financing for Development Rome Declaration on Aid Harmonisation Marrakech Memorandum on Managing for Results Paris Declaration on Aid Effectiveness Conclusion Challenges 1. Introduction:  1. Introduction The paradox of a long history of development assistance (ODA) on one hand and persistence of poverty in developing countries on the other started to raise global concern in 1990s Investigations into the reasons for the failure of aid to deliver sustainable development and poverty reduction led to dialogue and a range of commitments at regional and international levels on how to make development assistance more effective OECD/DAC Working Party on Aid effectiveness and Donor Practices Strategic Partnership with Africa (SPA) 1. Introduction (continued):  1. Introduction (continued) Big Table II Consultations NORDIC Initiatives UN Work and Initiatives - ECOSOC Commission for Africa (Blair’s Initiative) NEPAD Bilateral/Multilateral Consultations This presentation recaptures a few agreements, which guide the harmonization/JAS process in Tanzania 2. Millennium Development Goals:  2. Millennium Development Goals Agreed in 2000 by developing countries and donors at the UN Millennium Summit as an international road map for achieving poverty reduction until 2010 MDGs consist of 8 goals that address major economic and social dimensions of poverty 1. Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger 2. Achieve universal primary education 3. Promote gender equality and empower women 4. Reduce child mortality 5. Improve maternal health 6. Combat HIV/AIDS, Malaria and other diseases 7. Ensure environmental sustainability 8. Develop a Global Partnership for Development 2. Millennium Development Goals (cont.):  2. Millennium Development Goals (cont.) Examples are: Goal 1: Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger Halve, between 1990 and 2015, the proportion of people whose income is less than USD 1 a day; Halve, between 1990 and 2015, the proportion of people who suffer from hunger. Goal 6: Combat HIV/AIDS, Malaria, and other diseases Have halted by 2015 and begun to reverse the spread of HIV/AIDS; Have halted by 2015 and begun to reverse the incidence of malaria and other major diseases. Goal 7: Ensure environmental sustainability Halve, by 2015, the proportion of people without sustainable access to safe drinking water; etc. 2. Millennium Development Goals (cont.):  2. Millennium Development Goals (cont.) Goal 8: Develop a Global Partnership for Development Develop further an open, rule-based, predictable non-discriminatory trading and financial system; Address the special needs of the Least Developed Countries; Deal comprehensively with the debt problems of developing countries; Provide access to affordable and essential drugs in developing countries; etc. 18 specific targets and 48 indicators for measuring achievement of these 8 goals provide clear benchmarks that guide developing country and donor efforts in poverty reduction and development 3. Monterrey Consensus on Financing for Development:  3. Monterrey Consensus on Financing for Development Agreed between developing and developed countries in Monterrey in 2002 to embrace a new partnership for achieving development and poverty reduction, in particular the MDGs Mutual commitment to mobilising resources for financing development Recognition of each country’s primary responsibility for its economic and social development and developing countries’ need to take a lead in managing their development processes (ownership) 4. Rome Declaration on Aid Harmonisation:  4. Rome Declaration on Aid Harmonisation Agreed in 2003 by developing countries and donors to make development cooperation more effective for attaining development, in particular the MDGs Outlines good practice standards and principles in development cooperation, among others Promoting local ownership and leadership Aligning development assistance with developing country priorities, strategies and systems Improving aid coordination and harmonisation Improving transparency, accountability and predictability of aid Strengthening the capacity of aid recipient governments 5. Marrakech Memorandum on Managing for Results:  5. Marrakech Memorandum on Managing for Results Agreed in 2004 by multilateral development banks and the OECD DAC to foster a global partnership on managing for results Commitment to supporting developing countries in strengthening their capacity to better manage for development results, and to aligning donor support with desired country results Specifies 5 core principles on managing for results, among others focusing dialogue on results; aligning programming, monitoring and evaluation with expected results; use results information for learning and decision making 6. Paris Declaration on Aid Effectiveness:  6. Paris Declaration on Aid Effectiveness Agreed in March 2005 by developing countries, bilateral and multilateral agencies and regional organisations to accelerate progress in aid effectiveness Commitment to Partnership Principles Reaffirmed commitments made at Rome to harmonize and align aid delivery and to accelerate progress in implementation, especially in the following areas: Strengthening partner countries’ national development strategies and associated operational frameworks. Increasing alignment of aid with partner countries’ priorities, systems and procedures and helping to strengthen their capacities. Enhancing donors’ and partner countries’ respective accountability. Eliminating duplication of efforts and rationalizing donor activities. Reforming and simplifying donor policies and procedures etc. 6. Paris Declaration (continued):  6. Paris Declaration (continued) Commitment to taking concrete and effective action to address the remaining challenges, including: Weaknesses in partner countries’ institutional capacities to develop and implement results-driven national development strategies. Failure to provide more predictable and multi-year commitments on aid flows to committed partner countries. Insufficient delegation of authority to donors’ field staff, and inadequate attention to incentives for effective development partnerships between donors and partner countries. Insufficient integration of global programmes and initiatives into partner countries’ broader development agendas, including in critical areas such as HIV/AIDS. Corruption and lack of transparency. Specifies global targets for 2010 and indicators to internationally monitor country progress 6. Paris Declaration (continued) Paris Indicators of progress:  6. Paris Declaration (continued) Paris Indicators of progress Partners have operational development strategies Reliable country systems Aid flows are aligned on national priorities Strengthen capacity by coordinated support Use of country systems Strengthen capacity by avoiding parallel implementation structures Aid is more predictable At least 75% of partner countries Target for improvement to be set by September 2005 85% of aid flows reported on budgets Target for improvement to be set by September 2005 Target for improvement to be set by September 2005 Target for improvement to be set by September 2005 At least 75% of such aid released on schedule 6. Paris Declaration (continued) Paris Indicators of progress (cont.):  6. Paris Declaration (continued) Paris Indicators of progress (cont.) Aid is untied Use of common arrangements or procedures Encourage shared analysis Results-oriented frameworks Mutual accountability Continued progress At least 25% Target for improvement to be set by September 2005 75% of partner countries Target for improvement to be set by September 2005 7. Conclusion:  7. Conclusion Serious commitment at the international level – what is needed are actions From Paris to the country level The Government of Tanzania aims to reduce poverty and achieve the Millennium Development Goals through the MKUKUTA and through a collective effort of the Government and our Development Partners under a Joint Assistance Strategy The JAS aims to work in the spirit of the internationally agreed principles for aid effectiveness, articulated in Monterrey, Rome, Marrakech and Paris, with a view to attaining Tanzania’s development and poverty reduction goals and the MDGs The international commitment of our Development Partners to these principles gives us confidence to put greater efforts into harmonization and in particular to embark on the JAS 8. Challenges:  8. Challenges Translating the international commitments into actions – ‘How’ and ‘when’ are the critical questions This requires fundamental changes and serious decisions to be made by Development Partner headquarters as well as substantial reforms by developing countries Mid-term review of the MDGs – Performance? Report of the UN Secretary General 21st March 2005: “At no time in human history have the fates of every woman, man and child been so intertwined across the globe. We are united both by moral imperatives and by objective interests. We can build a world in larger freedom – but to do it we must find common ground and sustain collective action.”

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