Innovation

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Published on May 2, 2008

Author: Kestrel

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Slide1:  Innovation in Action A Few Innovations of the Past 20 Years in the College of Engineering at NC State University Slide2:  Three-panel display for “Innovation in Action” Hall of Fame, April 19, 2005, held in celebration of the 20th anniversary of Centennial Campus, showing just a few of the innovations in the College of Engineering over the past 20 years. Martha K. Brinson, Director of Communication, College of Engineering Photos: Herman Lankford, Jay Mangum, Jerry Kohl, Roger Winstead, Fred DeJarnette, Rich Spontak, Linda Rudd, Jon Pishney, plus courtesy images: Cree Inc., Charles Hall, and University of Melbourne. Slide3:  1984 - Land transferred to NC State University by Governor James B. Hunt 1986 - Board of Trustees approves Master Plan 1989 - Landmark event as first building, Research I, opens and College of Engineering (Precision Engineering Center) becomes first occupant of Centennial Campus College of Engineering Charts Landmark Event as First Occupant of Centennial Campus Slide4:  A Tumbleweed Gets Rolling on Mars The tumbling tumbleweed — a symbol of the stark prairie solitude of the American West — may one day roll across the red wastes of Mars on a wandering high-tech search for water and life. NC State students just may be the ones to get things rolling. That's the concept behind a NASA project led by Fred DeJarnette, who enlisted a Kenan Fellow teacher and 100 sixth-graders to help with the design and testing of prototypes. The high-tech tumbleweed, which will be propelled by the winds on Mars, will cover large areas of the planet while collecting atmospheric and geological data. Here DeJarnette’s students at NC State display their Tumbleweed project. Aerospace Engineering. Slide5:  Accelerated Programs for Top Students A student studies summer typhoon conditions in Southeast Asia on the responsive workbench, a 44-inch display device capable of projecting 3D stereo images. The workbench is part of a special research lab built exclusively for students in the Accelerated Undergraduate Research in Computer Science (AURICS) program. The lab’s state-of-the-art equipment includes PCs with multiple flat-panel displays and high-speed graphics and networking cards, a Silicon Graphics (SGI) workstation, a Sony Playstation® programming environment, and industry-strength development software. AURICS offers the brightest students a chance to participate in research projects beyond the scope of their normal coursework. Computer Science. Slide6:  Advancements in Robotics Aid the Furniture Industry A robot for sanding applications is used in an experiment for flexible furniture manufacturing. NC State is known internationally for its leading furniture manufacturing and management program. Industrial Engineering and Furniture Manufacturing and Management. Slide7:  An Explosion of Options in Chip Design The ability to create microelectro-mechanical systems (MEMS) on the same surface and with the same fabrication process as integrated circuits will give future chip makers an explosion of options in their designs. MEMS, by itself, enables designers to create motors, sensors, and actuators on the micron scale. Nevertheless, the real benefits of this technology will be realized as a result of manufacturability. Researchers at NC State are conducting front-running investigations into MEMS design for applications in high bandwidth optical routing, optical scanners and laser radar, and high speed digital switching and RF electrical signal routing. Electrical and Computer Engineering. Slide8:  Artificial Limbs through Rapid Prototyping Ola Harrysson and Denis Cormier built 3-D replicas of a dog’s deformed legs, allowing veterinarian Denis Marcellin-Little (left, with Harrysson) to practice the surgery before performing it on the dog. The process, called “rapid prototyping,” represents a wide area of possibility for medicine by smoothing the way for customized surgeries. A first-of-its-kind surgical procedure in spring 2005 gave a family cat, born without the lower half of its hind legs, the chance to walk with the help of functional prosthetic feet, thanks to the research conducted by Harrysson (right) and Cormier. Industrial Engineering. Slide9:  Artificial Retina — Restoring Sight to the Blind Wentai Liu’s artificial retina has drawn attention worldwide. Here Liu holds the chip embedded in a test strip. UNC-Chapel Hill graduate student Elliot McGucken developed the photoreceptors used in the chip. As of 2005, six people who had lost their sight can now see, thanks to groundbreaking work by NC State’s Electrical Engineering researchers who developed the prototype microchip for the artificial retina. In current related research, Gianluca Lazzi received a grant from the Whitaker Foundation to pursue investigation of the use of a high data rate telemetry link for a new generation of retinal prosthesis to restore sight in the blind. Electrical and Computer Engineering and Biomedical Engineering. Boosting the Nation’s Competitive Edge in Semiconductors In 1988 NC State won $12.7 million in funding from NSF to establish the Center for Advanced Electronic Materials Processing. The overall budget for the initial five years was $28.2 million, encompassing work with NSF as well as industrial affiliates. This was an NC State funding record at the time. Center director (now Dean of Engineering) Nino Masnari worked with John Hauser and a team of colleagues from NC State, Duke, UNC-CH, RTI, NC A&T, MCNC, and UNC-Charlotte to develop techniques that helped boost America’s competitive position in semiconductor manufacturing. Center for Advanced Electronic Materials Processing.:  Boosting the Nation’s Competitive Edge in Semiconductors In 1988 NC State won $12.7 million in funding from NSF to establish the Center for Advanced Electronic Materials Processing. The overall budget for the initial five years was $28.2 million, encompassing work with NSF as well as industrial affiliates. This was an NC State funding record at the time. Center director (now Dean of Engineering) Nino Masnari worked with John Hauser and a team of colleagues from NC State, Duke, UNC-CH, RTI, NC A&T, MCNC, and UNC-Charlotte to develop techniques that helped boost America’s competitive position in semiconductor manufacturing. Center for Advanced Electronic Materials Processing. Breakthroughs in Solid State Power Semiconductors Jay Baliga’s innovations in solid state power semiconductors have rocked the industrial world. On September 7, 1999, Baliga attained his 100th patent, an accomplishment claimed by only a few. The 100th patent gave Baliga and NC State legal recognition for inventing an electric switch that is expected to improve significantly the energy efficiency of household appliances, electric trains and cars, air conditioning units, and other large machines. Baliga is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Electrical Engineering. :  Breakthroughs in Solid State Power Semiconductors Jay Baliga’s innovations in solid state power semiconductors have rocked the industrial world. On September 7, 1999, Baliga attained his 100th patent, an accomplishment claimed by only a few. The 100th patent gave Baliga and NC State legal recognition for inventing an electric switch that is expected to improve significantly the energy efficiency of household appliances, electric trains and cars, air conditioning units, and other large machines. Baliga is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Electrical Engineering. Extremophiles for Better Medicine, Better Environment Robert Kelly and colleagues work with enzymes derived from extremophiles — microorganisms that thrive in brutally harsh environments such as volcanoes or arctic pools. The enzymes soon may make medical therapies more effective, facilitate extraction of oil from the earth, or even make milkshakes thicker. Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. :  Extremophiles for Better Medicine, Better Environment Robert Kelly and colleagues work with enzymes derived from extremophiles — microorganisms that thrive in brutally harsh environments such as volcanoes or arctic pools. The enzymes soon may make medical therapies more effective, facilitate extraction of oil from the earth, or even make milkshakes thicker. Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. First in Flight, First in National Competition NC State students took first place in the Energy Challenge '03 competition at Jockey's Ridge State Park, Kitty Hawk. The student didn’t just win a contest; they built the plane with paper wings, using paper they manufactured themselves. In addition, they developed an educational website for school children and involved them in the learning process and competition. Multidisciplinary team, College of Engineering. :  First in Flight, First in National Competition NC State students took first place in the Energy Challenge '03 competition at Jockey's Ridge State Park, Kitty Hawk. The student didn’t just win a contest; they built the plane with paper wings, using paper they manufactured themselves. In addition, they developed an educational website for school children and involved them in the learning process and competition. Multidisciplinary team, College of Engineering. First in Nuclear Engineering in the Nation NC State University was the first US university to establish a nuclear engineering education program. Today the Department of Nuclear Engineering continues to be a dynamic and growing one, evolving with the nuclear industry and national laboratory programs. It is one of the top-ranked nuclear engineering programs in the world (ranked 8th by USN&WR). Nuclear Engineering. :  First in Nuclear Engineering in the Nation NC State University was the first US university to establish a nuclear engineering education program. Today the Department of Nuclear Engineering continues to be a dynamic and growing one, evolving with the nuclear industry and national laboratory programs. It is one of the top-ranked nuclear engineering programs in the world (ranked 8th by USN&WR). Nuclear Engineering. First-of-a-Kind Turbojet This largely remotely piloted turbojet vehicle is the first of its kind; the turbot jet, which obtains in-flight dynamic data, was built and developed by researchers Charles Hall and John Perkins and their students at NC State. This is a 17.5 percent scale model of the F/A-18E Super Hornet with twin turbojet engines. There were 12 computers on board the Remotely Piloted Vehicle (RPV) to collect data about the dynamic response of the aircraft. The data, analyzed to estimate the aerodynamic model of the aircraft, were then applied to the simulation of the full-scale aircraft. Aerospace Engineering. :  First-of-a-Kind Turbojet This largely remotely piloted turbojet vehicle is the first of its kind; the turbot jet, which obtains in-flight dynamic data, was built and developed by researchers Charles Hall and John Perkins and their students at NC State. This is a 17.5 percent scale model of the F/A-18E Super Hornet with twin turbojet engines. There were 12 computers on board the Remotely Piloted Vehicle (RPV) to collect data about the dynamic response of the aircraft. The data, analyzed to estimate the aerodynamic model of the aircraft, were then applied to the simulation of the full-scale aircraft. Aerospace Engineering. Improving the Quality of Life Clement Kleinstreuer and his students collaborate with vascular surgeons to find ways to prevent repeat surgeries and improve the quality of life for heart patients. As part of this biofluid mechanics project, they examine a velocity vector plot for normal carotid artery bifurcation. Mechanical Engineering. :  Improving the Quality of Life Clement Kleinstreuer and his students collaborate with vascular surgeons to find ways to prevent repeat surgeries and improve the quality of life for heart patients. As part of this biofluid mechanics project, they examine a velocity vector plot for normal carotid artery bifurcation. Mechanical Engineering. Innovations in Construction in the CFL The Constructed Facilities Laboratory (CFL) on Centennial Campus provides facilities to develop and test innovations to improve the state's and nation's constructed infrastructure, such as highways, bridges, and buildings. One of few such facilities in existence, the CFL contains some of the largest testing equipment in the US. Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering. :  Innovations in Construction in the CFL The Constructed Facilities Laboratory (CFL) on Centennial Campus provides facilities to develop and test innovations to improve the state's and nation's constructed infrastructure, such as highways, bridges, and buildings. One of few such facilities in existence, the CFL contains some of the largest testing equipment in the US. Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering. IES director Terri Helmlinger is the first woman to serve as president of the National Society of Professional Engineers. :  IES director Terri Helmlinger is the first woman to serve as president of the National Society of Professional Engineers. Innovations in Outreach In 2004-05, the Industrial Extension Service’s Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP) program served 695 companies for economic impact of $70.46 million. The NC Solar Center at NC State conducts the lead solar energy program in North Carolina and is a leader in the US. Industrial Extension Service Inspiring Future Engineers Laura Bottomley’s innovative teaching style has not gone unnoticed by the National Science Foundation, who has granted her $2 million to support educational collaboration with Wake County public schools.  Bottomley and her team work to inspire students, especially under-represented groups, about learning math and science. The grant helps fund a new program called Recognizing Accelerated Math Potential in Under-Represented People (RAMP-UP), which seeks to raise interest and performance in math for women and minorities.  The colleges of Engineering and Education at NC State first launched the program with the help of a $500,000 grant from the GE Foundation. RAMP-UP is designed to promote and facilitate the teaching of problem-solving and inquiry-based mathematics to children in grades K-12. Bottomley directs the Women in Engineering and Outreach Programs. College of Engineering. :  Inspiring Future Engineers Laura Bottomley’s innovative teaching style has not gone unnoticed by the National Science Foundation, who has granted her $2 million to support educational collaboration with Wake County public schools.  Bottomley and her team work to inspire students, especially under-represented groups, about learning math and science. The grant helps fund a new program called Recognizing Accelerated Math Potential in Under-Represented People (RAMP-UP), which seeks to raise interest and performance in math for women and minorities.  The colleges of Engineering and Education at NC State first launched the program with the help of a $500,000 grant from the GE Foundation. RAMP-UP is designed to promote and facilitate the teaching of problem-solving and inquiry-based mathematics to children in grades K-12. Bottomley directs the Women in Engineering and Outreach Programs. College of Engineering. Invention of the Flat-Panel Plasma Display Donald Bitzer won an Emmy in 2002 for co-inventing the flat-panel plasma display panel in 1964. Bitzer is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Computer Science. :  Invention of the Flat-Panel Plasma Display Donald Bitzer won an Emmy in 2002 for co-inventing the flat-panel plasma display panel in 1964. Bitzer is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Computer Science. Leading the World in Environmentally Friendly Processes NC State University, UNC-Chapel Hill, NC A&T SU and the University of Texas at Austin received a $24 million grant — the largest in the UNC system — in 1999 from NSF to advance groundbreaking research into environmentally friendly solvents. The NSF Science and Technology Center (STC) for Environmentally Responsible Solvents and Processes is co-directed by Joe DeSimone and Ruben Carbonell. The STC will be the leading center in the world dedicated to discovering environmentally friendly processes. DeSimone is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. :  Leading the World in Environmentally Friendly Processes NC State University, UNC-Chapel Hill, NC A&T SU and the University of Texas at Austin received a $24 million grant — the largest in the UNC system — in 1999 from NSF to advance groundbreaking research into environmentally friendly solvents. The NSF Science and Technology Center (STC) for Environmentally Responsible Solvents and Processes is co-directed by Joe DeSimone and Ruben Carbonell. The STC will be the leading center in the world dedicated to discovering environmentally friendly processes. DeSimone is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. Slide22:  Christine Grant, here with students, was recognized for her work in mentoring by receiving the PAESMEM for 2003. She has served as a research mentor to students in NASA’s Undergraduate Researchers program and NSF’s Research Experience for Undergraduates program. She has inspired students on professional development in lectures given across the globe. Engineering students at the University of Science and Technology in Ghana, West Africa, named a library in her honor for her mentoring efforts. Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. Mentoring, Motivating In 2000 the College of Engineering received the prestigious Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics and Engineering Mentoring (PAESMEM) for outstanding achievements in and contributions to mentoring in the science, mathematics and engineering fields. Sarah Rajala, Tony Mitchell and Laura Bottomley received the award in Washington, DC, on behalf of the college. College of Engineering. Miniature Heart Sensors Aiding Cardiac Research Troy Nagle, along with Jason Fiering, developed a sensor array for mouse hearts that is much smaller than this array created for dog hearts. The new mouse heart arrays will aid cardiac research. The researchers use a miniature heart-lung machine to supply blood to the tiny, isolated mouse hearts. The machine allows researchers complete access to the heart for study and maintains the working heart in excellent condition for long periods of time. Nagle heads NC State’s joint program in Biomedical Engineering with UNC-Chapel Hill. Biomedical Engineering. :  Miniature Heart Sensors Aiding Cardiac Research Troy Nagle, along with Jason Fiering, developed a sensor array for mouse hearts that is much smaller than this array created for dog hearts. The new mouse heart arrays will aid cardiac research. The researchers use a miniature heart-lung machine to supply blood to the tiny, isolated mouse hearts. The machine allows researchers complete access to the heart for study and maintains the working heart in excellent condition for long periods of time. Nagle heads NC State’s joint program in Biomedical Engineering with UNC-Chapel Hill. Biomedical Engineering. Novel Applications Derived from Heat-Loving Bacteria A graduate student works with the reactor/fermentor used to grow heat-loving bacteria for a variety of novel enzyme-based applications. Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. :  Novel Applications Derived from Heat-Loving Bacteria A graduate student works with the reactor/fermentor used to grow heat-loving bacteria for a variety of novel enzyme-based applications. Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. Paving the Way of the Future with High-Performance Concrete Paul Zia et al. developed high-performance concrete for structural and transportation applications. Their procedures increased strength and decreased hardening time of concrete used to build and maintain roadways and bridge decks, thereby reducing the time it takes for repair and construction. Zia is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering. :  Paving the Way of the Future with High-Performance Concrete Paul Zia et al. developed high-performance concrete for structural and transportation applications. Their procedures increased strength and decreased hardening time of concrete used to build and maintain roadways and bridge decks, thereby reducing the time it takes for repair and construction. Zia is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering. Pioneering Methods in 3-D Weaving Technology Innovations in three-dimensional weaving technology for manufacture of composite structural pre-forms by Mansour Mohamed led to the spinoff company, 3Tex. Here, a computer-controlled, three-dimensional weaving machine creates lightweight, high-impact structures for such things as armor vests and masts for boats. Textile Engineering. :  Pioneering Methods in 3-D Weaving Technology Innovations in three-dimensional weaving technology for manufacture of composite structural pre-forms by Mansour Mohamed led to the spinoff company, 3Tex. Here, a computer-controlled, three-dimensional weaving machine creates lightweight, high-impact structures for such things as armor vests and masts for boats. Textile Engineering. Pipe-Crawling Robot to Save Lives after Earthquakes This segmented robot developed at NC State has captured worldwide attention. “MOCASIn 2” (Modular Observation Crawler And Sensing Instrument) is outfitted with a tiny video camera and lights that feed video through a cable to a monitor so its location in the pipe can be seen. It inches along using pneumatics to force padded "feet" against pipe walls as it extends and contracts its body along a pipe course. When buildings collapse, pipes are sometimes the only remaining intact structure. This pipe-crawling robot can reach where humans cannot. The robot’s sensors "hear" or sense vibrations such as the sound of someone tapping on pipes for help. Students Steve Cottle, Brian Dessent, and Jason Cox, along with their professors, Eddie Grant and John Muth, developed the pipe-crawling robot. Electrical and Computer Engineering. :  Pipe-Crawling Robot to Save Lives after Earthquakes This segmented robot developed at NC State has captured worldwide attention. “MOCASIn 2” (Modular Observation Crawler And Sensing Instrument) is outfitted with a tiny video camera and lights that feed video through a cable to a monitor so its location in the pipe can be seen. It inches along using pneumatics to force padded "feet" against pipe walls as it extends and contracts its body along a pipe course. When buildings collapse, pipes are sometimes the only remaining intact structure. This pipe-crawling robot can reach where humans cannot. The robot’s sensors "hear" or sense vibrations such as the sound of someone tapping on pipes for help. Students Steve Cottle, Brian Dessent, and Jason Cox, along with their professors, Eddie Grant and John Muth, developed the pipe-crawling robot. Electrical and Computer Engineering. Restoration of Hearing for the Totally Deaf The research of Mark White and his colleagues helps the totally deaf population. By electrically stimulating the auditory nerve of these patients, significant understanding of speech has been provided to a majority of patients. White’s team, which has been directly involved in the design of these devices, conducts neurophysiological and psychophysical studies to continue to improve these prosthetic devices. Electrical and Computer Engineering. :  Restoration of Hearing for the Totally Deaf The research of Mark White and his colleagues helps the totally deaf population. By electrically stimulating the auditory nerve of these patients, significant understanding of speech has been provided to a majority of patients. White’s team, which has been directly involved in the design of these devices, conducts neurophysiological and psychophysical studies to continue to improve these prosthetic devices. Electrical and Computer Engineering. Rewritable Disks for High-Density Storage Jerome Cuomo (center) holds the 1995 National Medal of Technology he received along with Praveen Chaudhari of IBM (left) and Richard J. Gambino of SUNY-Stony Brook. In the 1970s, the trio developed the materials now used to make rewritable “magneto-optic” disks. Cuomo is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Materials Science and Engineering. :  Rewritable Disks for High-Density Storage Jerome Cuomo (center) holds the 1995 National Medal of Technology he received along with Praveen Chaudhari of IBM (left) and Richard J. Gambino of SUNY-Stony Brook. In the 1970s, the trio developed the materials now used to make rewritable “magneto-optic” disks. Cuomo is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Materials Science and Engineering. Setting the Standards for the Nuclear Engineering Industry Paul Turinsky and colleagues developed nuclear reactor fuel management optimization codes that are now used routinely by industry. NC State’s Nuclear Engineering department recently joined the $4.8 billion Idaho National Laboratory consortium, making NC State part of the nation’s premier initiative for nuclear energy research, development, and education. Nuclear Engineering. :  Setting the Standards for the Nuclear Engineering Industry Paul Turinsky and colleagues developed nuclear reactor fuel management optimization codes that are now used routinely by industry. NC State’s Nuclear Engineering department recently joined the $4.8 billion Idaho National Laboratory consortium, making NC State part of the nation’s premier initiative for nuclear energy research, development, and education. Nuclear Engineering. Simulation Model to Improve Drug Design and Delivery Chemical engineers at NC State have successfully simulated a process for training surfaces to recognize specific molecular sequences. The results of their research appear in the February 25, 2005, issue of Physical Review Letters. Carol Hall, Jan Genzer, and Arthi Jayaraman have developed a simulation method to design surfaces that recognize and selectively adsorb specific monomer sequences in copolymers. Hall is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. :  Simulation Model to Improve Drug Design and Delivery Chemical engineers at NC State have successfully simulated a process for training surfaces to recognize specific molecular sequences. The results of their research appear in the February 25, 2005, issue of Physical Review Letters. Carol Hall, Jan Genzer, and Arthi Jayaraman have developed a simulation method to design surfaces that recognize and selectively adsorb specific monomer sequences in copolymers. Hall is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. Topping the Charts in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering In the mid-1990s the National Research Council ranked NC State’s chemical engineering program Number One in the Southeast. The department is recognized as one of the leading chemical and biomolecular engineering departments in the US. Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. :  Topping the Charts in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering In the mid-1990s the National Research Council ranked NC State’s chemical engineering program Number One in the Southeast. The department is recognized as one of the leading chemical and biomolecular engineering departments in the US. Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. World’s First LEDs In the 1980’s, under the direction of Robert Davis, a group of NC State students developed a process to grow silicon carbide crystals. Sliced into diodes and wired with circuit patterns, these crystals emit a blue light used in microwaves, electronics, high-temperature and high-power situations, and as a substrate to grow 3-5 nitrides. In 1987 the students founded Cree, the world’s first manufacturer of blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Cree Research, Inc. of the Research Triangle Park, NC, is headed by one of those cofounders, Dr. Calvin H. Carter Jr. :  World’s First LEDs In the 1980’s, under the direction of Robert Davis, a group of NC State students developed a process to grow silicon carbide crystals. Sliced into diodes and wired with circuit patterns, these crystals emit a blue light used in microwaves, electronics, high-temperature and high-power situations, and as a substrate to grow 3-5 nitrides. In 1987 the students founded Cree, the world’s first manufacturer of blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Cree Research, Inc. of the Research Triangle Park, NC, is headed by one of those cofounders, Dr. Calvin H. Carter Jr. The breakthrough research opened doors for the development of blue and green LEDs, energy-efficient white light generation, high-power solid-state microwave amplifiers, and high-quality, manmade gemstones (Moissonite). The team was instrumental in perfecting and commercializing silicon carbide semiconductor wafers for military and consumer markets. In this image, “Cree” is spelled out in blue LEDs. Davis is a member of the National Academy of Engineering. Materials Science and Engineering. World’s Smallest Man-Made Laser In 1989 Bob Kolbas and colleagues developed the world’s smallest man-made lasers, in which laser action occurs in a film about one hundred-thousandth the thickness of a human hair. Electrical and Computer Engineering. :  World’s Smallest Man-Made Laser In 1989 Bob Kolbas and colleagues developed the world’s smallest man-made lasers, in which laser action occurs in a film about one hundred-thousandth the thickness of a human hair. Electrical and Computer Engineering. Slide35:  North Carolina State University College of Engineering Innovation in Action

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