Inclusion_and_Disability

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Information about Inclusion_and_Disability
Education

Published on April 26, 2014

Author: KHodnett

Source: authorstream.com

PowerPoint Presentation: Group was not exported from SlideRocket   SPED 778 – Session 1 Inclusion and Disability Slides Created by David Connor with Revision by Kristen L. Pavelec Inclusive Instruction in General Education Classrooms for Students with Learning and Behavior Disorders Welcome to Inclusion: Welcome to Inclusion PowerPoint Presentation:    What do know and/or think about inclusion? PowerPoint Presentation: Inclusion Inclusion is an approach to educating students with special educational needs . Under the inclusion model, students with special needs spend most or all of their time with non-disabled students. Implementation of these practices varies. Schools most frequently use them for selected students with mild to severe special needs. Inclusion is about the child’s right to participate and the school’s duty to accept the child. Inclusion rejects the use of special schools or classrooms to separate students with disabilities from students without disabilities. A premium is placed upon full participation by students with disabilities and upon respect for their social, civil, and educational rights. PowerPoint Presentation:    Some Common Confusions with Inclusion A Free and Appropriate Public Education PowerPoint Presentation:    Some Common Confusions with Inclusion A Free and Appropriate Public Education: No ambivalence with the term “free” Plenty of interpretations of “appropriate” Who interprets the nature of the disability? Where is the FAPE? Separate classrooms, separate schools? PowerPoint Presentation: IS SPECIAL EDUCATION… A SERVICE OR A PLACE? PowerPoint Presentation:    Some Common Confusions with Inclusion The Least Restrictive Environment (LRE) PowerPoint Presentation:    Some Common Confusions with Inclusion The Least Restrictive Environment (LRE) “To the maximum extent appropriate, children with disabilities, including children in public or private institutions or other care facilities, are educated with children who are not disabled, and special classes, separate schooling, or other removal of children with disabilities from the regular educational environment occurs only when the nature or severity of the disability of a child is such that education in regular classes with the use of supplementary aids and services cannot be achieved satisfactorily” 20 U.S.C § 1412(a)(5)(A). PowerPoint Presentation: SPOTLIGHT ON LRE: Which environment will best suit the needs of the child? 1.General Ed – few or no supportive services 2. General Ed – with collaborative teacher assistance 3. General Ed – with Special Ed Teacher Support Services (SETTS/Formerly Resource Room) 4. Special Ed. Classroom, with part time in general education 5. Full time special education classroom 6. Special Day school 7. Residential School 8. Homebound instruction 9. Hospital/Institution LEAST MOST PowerPoint Presentation:    Some Common Confusions with Inclusion Nondiscriminatory Identification and Evaluation PowerPoint Presentation:    Some Common Confusions with Inclusion: Nondiscriminatory Identification and Evaluation History of discrimination Spanish Speaking children evaluated in English Cultural biases within assessments “Subjective” labels LD, ED/BD, CI (MR), S & L = 85% PowerPoint Presentation:    Some Common Confusions with Inclusion Parental Participation PowerPoint Presentation:    Some Common Confusions with Inclusion Parental Participation-Do parents really have a say during the meeting? Informative or Alienating? Information to parents should be provided in first language Issues of social class, race, ethnicity, language, education level, parental disability all come into play and have an effect on the outcome. Pre-determined decisions made before the meeting begins Placement becomes a thing of convenience not need. PowerPoint Presentation:    Some Common Confusions with Inclusion The Individualized Education Program PowerPoint Presentation:    Some Common Confusions with Inclusion: The Individualized Education Program Vary in format and length from state to state and school to school “living documents” Is it really? Does it change? Legal documents-can be used it court. Access-How easy is it to obtain? Include an LRE statement PowerPoint Presentation:  The Division within Special Education (Andrews et al).   PowerPoint Presentation: STUDENT VOICES: “As a child, it was very shameful to be in the learning disabled classes or be considered ‘retarded’ in any form…Having a learning disability is only a small part of who I am.” (Marshall, 2001, p. 120) “…I was taught to hate myself…my foundations for hating myself grew out of my much noted short comings and lack of abilities deemed positive…I became less than.” (Pelkey, 2001, p. 18) ---------------------------- “There are so many positive aspects of ADHD. For example, I can do many things at one time successfully…My main goal is to be able to control my ADHD in certain settings and to use it as an advantage, rather than taking drugs to suppress my creative energy …The problem is that most of the literature is by people who do not have ADHD. They generalize …and say the symptoms are concrete. This is extremely offensive to me… [As] my situation can be totally different from another person with ADHD.” (O’Connor, 2001, p. 71). PowerPoint Presentation: THINKING ABOUT DISABILITY… WHO is disabled? …it depends upon who does the counting and who is included. “BALLPARK” 35-49 million Americans 1990 = 43 million (Americans with Disabilities Act) 1991 = 35 million. (Institute of Medicine) 1994 = 49 million (US Census projection) 15% of people are born with a disability 33% of disabled Americans are 65 or older (Shapiro, 1993, pp.6-7) PowerPoint Presentation: WHO IS DISABLED? (cont.) Worth bearing in mind… “ Disability is disproportionately represented among people living in poverty, women, elderly people, inner city residents, and people in developing countries. Attention needs to be paid to the factors that contribute to this pattern as well as to the marginality of disability resulting from the marginal nature of the groups most affected.” (Davis & Linton, 1997, p. 3) PowerPoint Presentation: WHAT IS A… COGNITIVE EMOTIONAL/BEHAVIORAL DISABILITY? PHYSICAL SENSORY PowerPoint Presentation: TYPES OF DISABILITY: 13 FEDERAL/LEGAL DEFINITIONS 1. Learning Disability (LD) 2. Speech or Language Impairment 3. Emotional Disturbance (ED) 4. Mental Retardation (MR) 5. Autism 6. Hearing Impairment 7. Visual Impairment 8. Deaf-Blindness 9. Orthopedic Impairment (OI) 10. Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) 11. Other Health Impairment 12. Multiple Disabilities 13. Developmental Delay PowerPoint Presentation: DISABILITY IN NEW YORK CITY SCHOOLS 2003-4 137, 930 students 11.1% of population 1. Learning Disability (LD) 46% 2. Speech or Language Impairment 24% 3. Emotional Disturbance (ED) 13% SUB TOTAL = 83% 4. Other Health Impairment 3.54% 5. Mental Retardation (MR) 4.6% 6. Multiple Disabilities 2.28% 7. Autism 2.6% 8. Hearing Impairment 2% 9. Orthopedic Impairment (OI) 0.85% 10. Visual Impairment 0.7% 11. Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) 0.22% 12. Deaf-Blindness 0.001% 13. Developmental Delay (n/a) PowerPoint Presentation: DESPITE LEGAL PROVISIONS, KIDS WITH DISABILITIES ARE A MAJOR CONCERN: WHY? Young people with disabilities drop out of high school at twice the rate of peers Enrollment rates in higher education are still 50% lower than enrollment among general population LD Label is problematic. Since 1976, numbers have grown more than 300% 80% of kids with LD have difficulty with reading (i.e. they have not learned how to read). Up to 40% of kids in special education are there because weren’t adequately taught to read. Children of color are over-represented in the “high incidence” categories of special education. (from President’s Commission on Excellence in Special Education) PowerPoint Presentation: RECENT REPORT (2005) REVIEWING NYC DOE SPECIAL EDUCATION Included recommendations: A consistent and stream-lined approach for general education interventions and supports that are provided to children experiencing challenges with reading and behavior. An emphasis on collaborative models that focus on how to provide effective access to general education curriculum for students with disabilities. The need for a fluid and flexible system of services to serve, at minimum, all students with high incidence disabilities—and on a case by case basis, students with low-incidence disabilities. PowerPoint Presentation: THINKING ABOUT “ABLE-BODIEDNESS” ….so what does it mean to be able bodied? (or non-disabled) What kinds of privileges does being able-bodied bring? PowerPoint Presentation: ABLESIM Definition: “…a pervasive discrimination and exclusion that oppresses people who have mental, emotional, and physical disabilities…Deeply rooted beliefs about health, productivity, beauty, and the value of human life, perpetuated by the public and private media, combine to create an environment that is often hostile to those whose physical, cognitive, and sensory abilities…fall out of the scope of what is currently defined as socially acceptable” (Rauscher & McClintock, 1996, p. 198) PowerPoint Presentation: ABLEISM IN SCHOOLS “The devaluation of disability results in societal attitudes that uncritically assert that it is better for a child to walk than roll, speak than sign, read print than read Braille, spell independently than use a spell check, and hang out with non-disabled children rather than only with other disabled students. In short, in the eyes of many educators and society, it is preferable for disabled students to do things the same way as their non-disabled peers.” (Hehir,2005, p. 15) PowerPoint Presentation: ABELISM AT WORK PowerPoint Presentation: ABLESIM IN LANGUAGE RETARD THAT’S SO LIMP.. Are you blind or something? A LAME EXCUSE! ARE YOU DEAF???? Can I ask a dumb question? It’s a case of the blind leading the blind You’re crazy!!! Can’t you see..?

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