Illustration Techniques personal interest 2012

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Information about Illustration Techniques personal interest 2012
Entertainment

Published on March 2, 2014

Author: Bookmaking4kids

Source: authorstream.com

PowerPoint Presentation: © 2013 Write On! Publishing® LLC PowerPoint Presentation: © 2013 Write On! Publishing® LLC Illustration Techniques PowerPoint Presentation: © 2013 Write On! Publishing® LLC There are some important ideas to keep in mind when illustrating your story so your pictures are interesting and entertaining. The most important thing is TAKE YOUR TIME! What is wrong with this illustration? Why is this illustration better than the first one? PowerPoint Presentation: © 2013 Write On! Publishing® LLC Use the zoom in method. Zoom in on the picture you want to draw instead of drawing the whole scene. Remember, you are working in a small area. Fill up your space with the illustration. For example, this is a story about a pencil who doesn’t like to write the letter “S” so instead of drawing the whole classroom, desk and the person who uses the pencil, just the pencil is drawn. PowerPoint Presentation: © 2013 Write On! Publishing® LLC Draw big pictures that fill up the background space. They are easier to see and to draw. Objects in your pictures need to be big enough that you can easily see facial expressions. Like the dog licking his chops and the smiles on the fish. PowerPoint Presentation: © 2013 Write On! Publishing® LLC All objects need to be the size of a penny or larger. Start with the head of a person or thing you are drawing and make sure it is the general size of a penny. Use the penny provided to help when you are illustrating. You do not have to make your head round like the penny, just the same size. PowerPoint Presentation: © 2013 Write On! Publishing® LLC Make your pictures visible. There should not be big open spaces without illustrations. Pictures that are smaller than a penny should be done over. PowerPoint Presentation: © 2013 Write On! Publishing® LLC If you plan to draw only one thing, then fill up the whole page with it, even if it is an ant. In real life, an ant would be just a tiny speck on the page. Instead, make the ant large so that the picture shows interesting details of his face and body.   PowerPoint Presentation: © 2013 Write On! Publishing® LLC Leave stick figures for grades 3 and below. If you need help to avoid drawing a stick figure, ask a friend or a teacher for assistance. More than likely, there are some good artists in your class that would be happy to show you how to draw people not as stick figures. PowerPoint Presentation: © 2013 Write On! Publishing® LLC These are not illustrations they are words. If you can’t think of what to draw, ask other students or the teacher for some ideas. Text instead of illustrations will have to be done over. PowerPoint Presentation: © 2013 Write On! Publishing® LLC If you are going to use words or a think or speech bubble, make sure they are big enough to see on the small space you are working in. It was important for the illustrator to show the words the bad bunnies were writing on the bedroom wall so she zoomed in on just the words instead of drawing the whole wall. PowerPoint Presentation: © 2013 Write On! Publishing® LLC These pictures are all too similar. Every one of the pictures is basically the same. Make sure each of your pictures are completely different from the next, as in the sample on the following page. PowerPoint Presentation: © 2013 Write On! Publishing® LLC Horizon Lines Horizon lines are lines used to separate the front of the picture from the back of the picture. In the stick figure girls, the line separates the grass from the sky as does the bee picture. PowerPoint Presentation: © 2013 Write On! Publishing® LLC You can use crayon or pencil. The most important thing to remember is that you use plenty of color if you want it to pick up in the scanning and printing process. If you have a black animal like a black cat, dog, panther, horse… color it gray, otherwise all of the facial features will get covered over with the black. Notice how the paws and facial features are covered up by the black color. PowerPoint Presentation: © 2013 Write On! Publishing® LLC See how every one of these pictures is completely different from the next. Keep this in mind when drawing your pictures. PowerPoint Presentation: © 2008 Write On!TM Publishing LLC If you do not know how to draw something that you want in your picture, just draw part of it. What is there only a part of in this picture? Also, if you can’t draw the picture you want to draw, just think of something else. © 2013 Write On! Publishing® LLC PowerPoint Presentation: © 2008 Write On!TM Publishing LLC What is the matter with these pictures? Keep in mind that pictures like this will need to be done over. If you can not think of what to draw, get ideas from friends or the teacher. © 2013 Write On! Publishing® LLC PowerPoint Presentation: © 2008 Write On!TM Publishing LLC How could you improve this picture? © 2013 Write On! Publishing® LLC PowerPoint Presentation: © 2008 Write On!TM Publishing LLC What are the improvements made to this picture? © 2013 Write On! Publishing® LLC PowerPoint Presentation: © 2008 Write On!TM Publishing LLC How could you improve this picture? © 2013 Write On! Publishing® LLC PowerPoint Presentation: © 2008 Write On!TM Publishing LLC What were the improvements made to this picture? © 2013 Write On! Publishing® LLC PowerPoint Presentation: © 2008 Write On!TM Publishing LLC How could you improve this picture? © 2013 Write On! Publishing® LLC PowerPoint Presentation: © 2008 Write On!TM Publishing LLC What were the improvements made? © 2013 Write On! Publishing® LLC PowerPoint Presentation: © 2013 Write On! Publishing® LLC You do not have to draw exactly what the text says. This page is about vegetable gardening. The text does not say that there was a Super Carrot but it still fits with the idea of gardening. Having fun with your pictures makes the story more enjoyable to read. PowerPoint Presentation: © 2013 Write On! Publishing® LLC This is another sample of not writing exactly what the text says. This page was about enjoying cooking. It didn’t say anything about a mouse in the story but the illustration has a mouse in it and the author is telling it to get away. Again, it adds a little fun to the pictures. Try to make your readers smile! PowerPoint Presentation: © 2013 Write On! Publishing® LLC This is the template you will use to draw your pictures. We will be drawing the pictures together so that you remember the steps and everybody finishes at the same time. PowerPoint Presentation: Get your Sharpie out of the publishing packet and write your first and last name exactly as it will be used in your books. © 2013 Write On! Publishing® LLC PowerPoint Presentation: © 2013 Write On! Publishing® LLC Read the text of page 1 of your “Personal Interests” story. Some drawing ideas might be: A picture of just you, a picture of something you like to do, a close-up picture of just one of your interests and it doesn’t necessarily have to be one you talk about in your story. It can be anything that has to do with an interest of yours. PowerPoint Presentation: © 2013 Write On! Publishing® LLC Check illustrations Draw your picture lightly with a pencil. Wait for the teacher to check your illustration for the following… Are your people and animal’s heads the size of a penny? Is it a picture and not just text? Is there more in the picture than just one big object like a baseball? Is the picture completely different from the other picture? Are you drawing lightly with a pencil? PowerPoint Presentation: © 2013 Write On! Publishing® LLC Now trace your entire illustration with your Sharpie. After tracing it, remember to erase any residual pencil marks. Sharpie Rule! Sharpies are expensive! Only use them to trace not to fill in big black areas, like a black hole. Use a black crayon. As soon as you are finished with the Sharpie, immediately put the cap back on. Check for tracing and erasing PowerPoint Presentation: © 2013 Write On! Publishing® LLC After tracing with a Sharpie, you will color your picture. Color pretty hard and thoroughly so all the areas are well colored. Take your time coloring. PowerPoint Presentation: © 2013 Write On! Publishing® LLC If you accidentally draw your pictures out of the correct order, you will have to cut them out and paste them perfectly over the old picture with the black outline showing as in picture 5 and 6. See how the black lines still show. If you don’t put them in the correct order, they will end up on the wrong pages of your book. Black line must still show PowerPoint Presentation: © 2013 Write On! Publishing® LLC Picture 2 This page will tell about your first interest. This author wrote about playing soccer. Even if the author doesn’t write about getting bonked in the head by a soccer ball it still fits with the “playing soccer” page and it brings a little humor to the story. As on the last page, draw your picture lightly with a pencil. Wait for the teacher to check your illustration for the following… PowerPoint Presentation: Are your people and animal’s heads the size of a penny? Is it a picture and not just text? Is there more in the picture than just one big object like a baseball? Is the picture completely different from the other picture? Are you drawing lightly with a pencil? Check illustrations and continue when all students are finished drawing © 2013 Write On! Publishing® LLC PowerPoint Presentation: © 2013 Write On! Publishing® LLC Picture 3 This author wrote about how he likes to build tree forts. The story doesn’t say that there is a “Kids Only” sign, but it was added to provide more information. How are you going to make your picture interesting? PowerPoint Presentation: Draw your picture lightly with a pencil. Wait for the teacher to check your illustration for the following… Are your people and animal’s heads the size of a penny? Is it a picture and not just text? Is there more in the picture than just one big object like a baseball? Is the picture completely different from the other picture? Are you drawing lightly with a pencil? © 2013 Write On! Publishing® LLC PowerPoint Presentation: © 2013 Write On! Publishing® LLC Picture 4 This author’s page was about how he likes to build model wind up airplanes. Look how he used scenery in his picture to make it a little more interesting instead of just drawing the plane. Notice how big and easy-to-read the text is in the speech bubble. If you use a speech bubble, make sure the text is readable. PowerPoint Presentation: © 2013 Write On! Publishing® LLC Picture 5 Draw your picture lightly with a pencil. Wait for the teacher to check your illustration for the following… Are your people and animal’s heads the size of a penny? Is it a picture and not just text? Is there more in the picture than just one big object like a baseball? Is the picture completely different from the other picture? Are you drawing lightly with a pencil? PowerPoint Presentation: Picture 6 Page 6 is the conclusion of your story. “The End” as in this sample is NOT an illustration. You could draw anything that interest you on the last page. As on the first page, it doesn’t have to be about something you wrote about. It could be riding your bike, flying an airplane, looking at a lion at the zoo, drawing, raising your hand in class, a fish you caught, a pretty sunset! Just something you enjoy. Not an illustration Good sample for page 6 of your story © 2013 Write On! Publishing® LLC PowerPoint Presentation: © 2013 Write On! Publishing® LLC Picture 6 Follow the same procedure Check students’ pictures before they Sharpie and color. 1. Draw with pencil. Before you trace with the Sharpie, have the teacher check your picture 2. Go over it with Sharpie and erase the pencil marks 3. Color hard with crayon PowerPoint Presentation: © 2013 Write On! Publishing® LLC On the last day of writing camp, you will brush over your pictures with paint as in the sample below. PowerPoint Presentation: © 2013 Write On! Publishing® LLC Your pictures will then be cropped like this and inserted into your books. PowerPoint Presentation: © 2013 Write On! Publishing® LLC Congratulations! You just finished your illustrations!

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