IBM Presentation Roel Spee

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Published on October 24, 2007

Author: Techy_Guy

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Hull Competitive Assessment by IBM-PLI Commissioned by Hull Citybuild:  Hull Competitive Assessment by IBM-PLI Commissioned by Hull Citybuild Hull, September 12, 2006 Slide2:  Introduction International Trends and Hull’s Position Project Objectives and Approach Results So Far: IBM-PLI Perspective Slide3:  Introduction Slide4:  IBM-Plant Location International (IBM-PLI) is a global service offering within IBM Global Business Services exclusively specialised in global location strategies Objective, unbiased and independent from government authorities and real estate interests Unrivalled experience as dedicated corporate location consultant : Over 45 years active in this consulting area; over 2,000 corporate projects conducted Multinational, multi-cultural and multilingual team of location experts in key practices in Belgium USA and India Access to functional, regional and industry specialists in major locations around the world Truly from strategy to implementation Experience with all types of facilities Understanding of corporate needs for their location strategies offers unique expertise for preparing tailored advice to economic development organizations Plant Location International: a global IBM service offering Key Practices for Global Location Strategies:  Americas Asia EMEA Key Practices for Global Location Strategies Main hubs Regional centers Global Delivery Examples of corporate clients for location advisory services * multiple assignments, only most recent names used:  Compaq Computer* Concert (AT&T/BT Corning* Daikin* DHL* Delphi Deutsche Bank* Diageo Digital Equipment Disney Dow Chemical* Dresdner Bank Du Pont Duty Free Shoppers* Eastman Chemical Eaton ECT* Eli Lilly EMC Energizer Engelhard Ericsson Esco ExxonMobil* FMC Fokker Ford Motor* Franklin Mint GAP GATX Genencor General Electric* General Instruments General Motors* Gillette* GlaxoSmithKline* Goodyear/Dunlop* Guardian Haagen-Dazs Heinz* Henkel Hercules Hertz Hewlett-Packard* Hitachi Hoechst Holcim* Holiday Inn Hoogovens HSBC IBM* ICI ICON Idemitsu IFF Indspec Ingersoll Rand Intel International Paper James Hardie* John Deere* Johnson & Johnson* Johnson Controls* JP MorganChase* JVC Kellogg Kimberly Clark* Kodak* Kone Kraft Foods Kuwait Petroleum LA Gear Level 3 Levi Strauss Little Tikes Lloyds Lufthansa Mary Kay Cosmetics Master Foods Mattel* Medtronic* Merck* Meritor Microsoft Mitsubishi Mobil Plastics Monsanto* Motorola Nashua National Instruments National Semiconductor NEC Nestlé* Netscape* Nike* Nissan Norske Skog Nortel Novartis* ABB ABN-AMRO* AGFA* AlliedSignal Alza* American Express Amgen Anglo-American Anheuser-Busch AstraZeneca* Avaya* Aventis* Avery Dennison Avis* Baxter* Bayer* Bekaert BF Goodrich* Biogen Borg-Warner Bose* Boston Scientific* BP Amoco* Bristol Myers Squibb* BAT Cadbury Schweppes Campbell Foods* Caterpillar Chiquita Citibank* Claire’s Coca Cola Colgate Nuon Owens Ollinois Paramount Pepsico* Phillip Morris* Philips* Procter & Gamble* PricewaterhouseCoopers* Prudential Investment Quintiles Radnor Ralston Purina Raychem Raytheon Reader’s Digest Reckitt & Colman Reuters* Rohm & Haas Rothmans Rubbermaid Sabena Samsung* SAS Airlines Saville Systems Schering Scott Paper Shell* Shire Pharmaceuticals Siemens* Sigma Coatings SKF Smiths Food Solvay Sony* Standard Chartered Bank* Sun Electric Sun Microsystems Swissair Tandem TDK Technicolor Telia Telxon Tetra Pak* Texas Instruments Toshiba Toyota* TPG Group UBM Unilever* Union Carbide United Biscuits United Technologies UPM-Kymmene Vaillant Visteon Volvo Warner Lambert Wellman Westvaco Whirlpool WL Gore Woolworth WordPerfect Xerox Xircom Examples of corporate clients for location advisory services * multiple assignments, only most recent names used Examples of clients for inward investment and economic development * multiple assignments:  Albania Foreign Investment Promotion Center Antilles Government of Aruba Government of Curaçao Australia Invest Australia* City and Port of Brisbane DSRD New South Wales°* Invest Victoria* Austria Austrian Business Agency* Vienna International Airport Azerbadjan Port of Baku Belgium Brussels Airport Flanders Foreign Investment Office* Office for Foreign Investm. Wallonia* Port of Antwerp* Canada Invest Canada Montreal International Province of Quebec Cape Verde Promex Caribbean Carribean Inward Investment Office China Xi’an Pharma Park, Shaanxi Costa Rica CINDE* Czech Rep. CzechInvest* Denmark Copenhagen Capacity* Invest in Denmark* Djibouti Government of Djibouti Estonia Port of Tallinn Ethiopia EIA Ethiopian Investment Authority France Ile de la Réunion Ile de France, Paris Invest in France/Datar* Nord-Pas de Calais Developpement* Port of Bordeaux Port of Le Havre* Germany Frankfurt Airport HWF Hamburg IIC (former East German States)* Nordrhein Westfalen* Saxony Economic Development Corp* Spain Port of Barcelona PromoMadrid Suriname Government of Suriname Sweden Confederation of Swedish Enterprises ISA Invest in Sweden Agency* Switzerland Canton of Schaffhausen Tanzania Tanzania Investment Centre Thailand Industrial Authority Esate of Thailand Tunisia Government of Tunisia Trinidad & Tobago Port Authority of Trinidad & Tobago Un. Arab Emirates Jebel Ali Port Authority, Dubai United Kingdom: England Advantage West Midlands* East Midlands Development Agency* MIDAS Manchester* North West Development Agency* UK Trade & Investment* - Scotland Edinburgh IFC Scottish Development International* Northern Ireland Invest Northern Ireland* - Wales Welsh Development Agency* USA Commonwealth of Pennsylvania* Greater Jamaica, NY Great Baltimore Alliance, MD Greater Phoenix Economic Council* Greenville, SC Maryland DBED* Michigan EDC Research Triangle Park, NC* State of Florida State if Illinois Toledo, OH International Asian Development Bank* organisations European Commission* OECD* UNCTAD* WAIPA* World Bank/MIGA* Ghana Ghana Investment Promotion Guadeloupe Port of Guadeloupe Hong Kong Trade and Investment Bureau Hungary ITD Hungary India Government of Gujarat SEZ Positra SEZ Ireland Enterprise Ireland* IDA Ireland* Israel Israeli FEPZ Italy PROMOS Milan Sviluppo Italia* Kuwait Kuwait Luxembourg Ministry of Transport Malaysia Port Klang Mexico Industrial Port Development Board Morocco Government of Morocco Port of Casablanca Namibia Namibia Investment Centre Netherlands Airport Amsterdam-Schiphol* Airport Maastricht-Aachen Netherlands Foreign Investm.Agency* Ports of Amsterdam and Rotterdam Philippines Cagayan Poland Industrial Development Agency PAIZ Polish Inward Investment Agency* Special Economic Zones (various) Portugal AIP Regio Norte Embassy of Portugal/ICEP* Puerto Rico Instituto de Fomento Russia Moscow St. Petersburg Saudi Arabia APEC General Investment Authority Singapore Ministry of Finance PSA Port of Singapore Authority* Singapore Econ. Development Board* South Africa COEGA Trade and Investment South Africa Examples of clients for inward investment and economic development * multiple assignments Slide8:  Roel Spee EMEA and Asia-Pacific Leader Office: + 32 2 416 5928 Mobile: + 32 475 915 832 E-mail: roel.spee@be.ibm.com Gene DePrez Americas Leader Office: + 1 973 726 4621 Mobile: + 1 201 874 8152 E-mail: gdeprez@us.ibm.com IBM-Plant Location International (IBM-PLI) Global Location Strategies Web-site: www.ibm.com/bcs/pli Slide9:  2. International Trends and Hull’s Position - Slight decrease of global investment in 2005:  - Slight decrease of global investment in 2005 Source: IBM-PLI – Global Investment Locations Database, GILD Evolution of number of projects - Top 15 countries account for 70% of overall recorded investment - Most developed countries show increase - Strong years for France, Poland and Vietnam:  Top ranking destination countries by number of projects - Top 15 countries account for 70% of overall recorded investment - Most developed countries show increase - Strong years for France, Poland and Vietnam Source: IBM-PLI – Global Investment Locations Database, GILD - USA still by far largest generator of cross border investment - Developed economies relative stable :  Source: IBM-PLI – Global Investment Locations Database, GILD Top ranking origin countries by number of projects - USA still by far largest generator of cross border investment - Developed economies relative stable - Business Services gain further importance - Industry sectors show decrease in foreign investment - Overall, same sectors remain in top 15:  Top ranking sectors by number of projects - Business Services gain further importance - Industry sectors show decrease in foreign investment - Overall, same sectors remain in top 15 Source: IBM-PLI – Global Investment Locations Database, GILD - Investment in new manufacturing plants is decreasing - R&D investment is fairly stable:  - Investment in new manufacturing plants is decreasing - R&D investment is fairly stable Source: IBM-PLI – Global Investment Locations Database, GILD Number of projects Slide15:  - USA, China and India hold top positions in most key sectors - France and UK also good top 5 performers Source: IBM-PLI – Global Investment Locations Database, GILD Top recipient countries in strongest FDI sectors, 2005 - UK remains on top in Europe, but is challenged by France - Eastern Europe reinforcing its position:  - UK remains on top in Europe, but is challenged by France - Eastern Europe reinforcing its position Destination countries by number of projects Europe Source: IBM-PLI – Global Investment Locations Database, GILD - Eastern Europe attracts most manufacturing, but France leads - UK now number 3, with market share decreased to 11%:  - Eastern Europe attracts most manufacturing, but France leads - UK now number 3, with market share decreased to 11% Europe - 2005 Source: IBM-PLI – Global Investment Locations Database, GILD Share of manufacturing projects by destination country - UK attracts most R&D, followed by other main economies - Eastern Europe gradually increasing its share:  - UK attracts most R&D, followed by other main economies - Eastern Europe gradually increasing its share Europe - 2005 Source: IBM-PLI – Global Investment Locations Database, GILD Share of R&D projects by destination country Slide19:  Source: IBM-PLI – Global Investment Locations Database, GILD - Within the UK, London/Southeast shows strongest performance - Yorkshire and Humberside relative small player Market share of UK regions for inward investment projects, 2003-2005 Slide20:  Source: IBM-PLI – Global Investment Locations Database, GILD - Success of London/Southeast driven by services projects - Non metropolitan areas hardly compete Market share of UK regions for services projects, 2003-2005 Slide21:  Source: IBM-PLI – Global Investment Locations Database, GILD - UK regions compete strongly for manufacturing - Yorkshire and the Humber not among the leaders Market share of UK regions for manufacturing projects, 2003-2005 Slide22:  Source: IBM-PLI – Global Investment Locations Database, GILD - Scotland successful in R&D; London/Southeast also strong - Yorkshire and the Humber scores weak Market share of UK regions for R&D projects, 2003-2005 Slide23:  Slight decrease in global investment in 2005 Europe is recovering and shows slight increase of inward investment; UK had a very strong year, but is challenged by France UK growth is driven by services and concentrates on Southeast/London Yorkshire and the Humber scores relatively poor for inward investment Many low cost regions have become very acceptable if not good quality business environments (e.g. Eastern Europe, Viet Nam) Global competition for investment is a reality MNCs have the option to seek talent pools anywhere in the world (global resourcing) Developed and developing economies compete more and more for same projects Offshore destinations in turn begin exporting jobs India and China already in top list of countries of origin of foreign investment Emerging markets are becoming key target for inward investment into UK and other developed countries Conclusions on International Investment Trends Slide24:  3. Project Objective and Approach Slide25:  Hull is undertaking a rationalization of economic development efforts Need to identify competitiveness and local strengths & weaknesses Using external assistance that provides insight in what companies really need and how economic development should respond to these needs International Economic Development Council (IEDC) provides consulting via global network of experts; strong experience with US economic development IBM-Plant Location International (IBM-PLI) offers unique understanding of corporate location decision making Background and objective Slide26:  Work program in two parts: IBM-PLI Competitive Assessment of Hull Not via a detailed competitive positioning analysis, but an initial assessment of competitive strengths & weaknesses based on location requirements of companies Objective to identify a selected number of potential target sectors/activities Providing input for next step by IEDC IEDC Action Plan Visit by IEDC Team of experts based on selected target sectors/activities Further assessment of potential and development of actionable recommendations Overall approach IBM-PLI’s Approach: Typical Steps in a Location Selection Process:  De-select less attractive locations: Many location options High level, quick analysis Based on desk research Focus on key cost & quality drivers Confidential High level business case Select best location solution: Detailed analysis of many factors Forward looking Field work to understand dynamics and identify pitfalls Assess implementation risks Interviews and negotiations Full business case Few locations only (short list) IBM-PLI’s Approach: Typical Steps in a Location Selection Process Slide28:  Location benchmarking from an investor’s perspective is required to assess competitive position and uses the same methodology as the shortlisting process by investors Objectives are: Understand competitiveness Create awareness Get longlisted and shortlisted IBM-PLI’s approach Competitive positioning from investor’s point of view Slide29:  IBM-PLI’s approach Cost-quality maps help to identify value proposition IBM-PLI’s approach Investor or Demand driven Competitive Assessment:  DEMAND Investor SUPPLY Competing locations SUPPLY Your location Key questions for competitive assessment: Is there are market of potential investors? Do we have the right product? Does our location meet the needs of these investors? And is our location competitive? IBM-PLI’s approach Investor or Demand driven Competitive Assessment 1 2 3 Slide31:  Competitive assessment in 3 steps: What Hull has to offer: High level analysis of Hull’s competitive strengths and weaknesses on the basis of key location requirements of investors. Demand side - overview of investment trends Analysis of investment trends, as input to identify potential target sectors Possible target sectors and activities: Comparison to competitor and best practice locations in order to identify key strengths and weaknesses and to assess the opportunities of Hull for each sector IBM-PLI’s approach Slide32:  Tasks performed in Feb-April 2006: Desk research Preparations of interviews with stakeholders Interviews with stakeholders (6-7 March 2006) Further desk research Report IBM-PLI’s approach Slide33:  4. Results So Far: IBM-PLI Perspective Slide34:  Focus on the main drivers and location criteria from an investor’s point of view SWOT analysis on each of the following factors: 1. Human capital 2. Education and R&D 3. Infrastructure 4. Attractiveness of the city 5. Costs Assessment of key sectors in the “as-is-situation” A. What Hull has to offer Slide35:  Local skills base in the region is presented in a fragmented way Investors focus on regions (labour markets), rather than cities Regional approach is required in marketing the Hull workforce to investors. Brain drain is a strong constraint in current offer of local talents New inward investment is needed to fill the skills gap, but investors will not come if those skills are not available Job creation for highly qualified staff needs to start from inside the region More attractive living and work environment is needed to encourage talents to stay The longer term objective is to increase attractiveness for inward investors as well A. What Hull has to offer: 1. Human Capital Slide36:  Hull’s regional education is rated of high quality and various strong research capabilities exist (Logistics, Wound Care, …) Educational strength is relatively unknown Cooperation between regional educational institutes and local business community is not perceived as optimal Hull should increase visibility and further develop linkages with the local business community. Both the College and the University should be an integral part of the regional workforce strategy A. What Hull has to offer: 2. Education and R&D Slide37:  Hull has ambition to develop into a digital hub ICT infrastructure in Hull is not better than elsewhere in UK or internationally. Investors see high quality ICT infrastructure and services as a ‘must have’ Hull first needs to invest in state-of-the-art ICT infrastructure and develop high quality e-services Further definition of precise improvement needs is required A. What Hull has to offer: 3. Infrastructure: ICT Slide38:  Sea ports are a key asset for Hull’s regional economy: Strong position and capacity for growth; vital links to Rotterdam; congestion in Southeast ports Opportunity to divert traffic from south to the Humber and create wider function However, cargo frequently just passing through, without added value Humber ports presented as separate options, no joint marketing Humber ports should market themselves as one integrated port area Focus on becoming a gateway for the UK as a whole, not just the North Sufficient opportunity to develop greenfield sites close to ports Road connection from port to hinterland has constraints Accessibility by air is weak, despite 3 regional airports Rail infrastructure is underused but needs improvement Potential to develop distriparks where logistics activities are concentrated Various infrastructural improvements are required however A. What Hull has to offer: 3. Infrastructure: ports and hinterland connections Slide39:  Hull suffers from a weak or lack of image, both nationally and internationally, and recent improvement efforts are relatively unknown. Perception is that of a traditional manufacturing and port city. Young people still leaving city for career elsewhere Joint regional and city marketing required to change perception Ongoing efforts to make Hull an attractive city to work and live: waterfront, hotel offer, leisure and entertainment, housing, etc. Market the region’s central location as gateway to the UK, not the North A. What Hull has to offer: 4. Attractiveness of the city Slide40:  Business costs in the region are very competitive in a UK context and relative to Western European locations. When competing with Eastern Europe or Asian locations, Hull/UK is less competitive from a cost point of view Use cost competitiveness as location advantage where relevant, but avoid too strong emphasis as unique selling point A. What Hull has to offer: 5. Costs Slide41:  A. What Hull has to offer: 6. Main sectors in the “as-is-situation” Despite decline of manufacturing UK/Europe, Hull still has important strengths in manufacturing (food, chemicals, steel, healthcare, engineering) Hull’s manufacturing base has remained relative stable, increasing its relative employment share within the UK However, most mobile manufacturing sectors are threatened by relocation. Less mobile sectors such as the chemicals sector tend to be more stable. Existing manufacturing strengths need to be nourished After care services need to ensure that key industries remain successful in the region, and even further expand where opportunities exist Innovation in existing industries needs to be stimulated; adding value and diversification increases the competitiveness of existing sectors and decreases the probability of relocation. Slide42:  The UK still is an attractive country for foreign direct investment (FDI), especially within a European context. A lot of inward investment is driven by market access. Services is growing; manufacturing declining. Manufacturing is shifting to low cost locations (mainly in Eastern Europe and Asia), who are quickly becoming good quality business environments. For Hull, “after care” or “business retention” services will be crucially important, not just to protect key companies from moving away but also to identify new investment potential New (sub-)sectors that are gaining importance are in life sciences, micro-electronics technologies and renewable energies. B. Demand side : Overview of investment trends Slide43:  Various target sectors may offer future opportunities for Hull. Important is to aim at a balance between traditional sectors where local strengths exist and new emerging sectors with longer term growth potential As some of the traditional sectors are threatened by delocalization, a professional after care strategy is considered crucial Following target sectors with opportunities were selected for further analysis: Value added logistics Healthcare and biomedical technologies Renewable energies In addition, opportunities for Hull as a second tier location for shared services centres were analyzed. C. Possible target sectors and activities: Slide44:  Traditional sectors in Hull are in need of a pro-active after care service. These are not the key sectors to focus on in an inward investment strategy, since no large numbers of new greenfield investment projects are expected. Such after care strategy first of all aims at protecting existing jobs, but also should help with identifying opportunities for new investment (expansion, attraction of suppliers, etc) from the moment they arise. Good relationships with existing companies can make those a generator of new leads for inward investment and an active participant in marketing the region. After care strategies also help in improving the local business environment, and in further developing local clusters C. Possible target sectors and activities: Aftercare strategy Slide45:  Hull has very strong potential to develop and position the region as a logistics hub, in particular for the UK market. Transportation and distribution has obvious links with the ports of Hull and the Humber Value added logistics is considered one of the growing activities in Europe Linkages exist with traditional industries in the area Opportunities exist for intensifying the links with Rotterdam Opportunities to develop and market the region as an entry point to the UK UK/Ireland likely to remain geographic market with dedicated distribution centres and channels Growing importance of Chinese investment in Europe offers an interesting link for Hull (initial presence of Chinese logistics projects) Opportunities to develop dedicated parks near ports for logistics activities (distriparks) C. Possible target sectors and activities: Value added logistics Slide46:  Points of attention to support this target sector are: Road/rail links to the hinterland Links with airport, offering opportunities for express couriers and multimodal transport Logistics Institute direct engagement with business community, leading-edge research, education, consultancy and technology transfer Particularly focused on skills development State-of-the-art ICT infrastructure Focus on regional centres, rather than on international/pan-European centres Promotion of Hull/the Humber as gateway to the UK market (not the North) Develop value proposition which shows logistics hub opportunity combined with strong cost competitiveness Competition mainly to come from other UK regions, but none is positioning itself very strongly as logistics hub or gateway to UK C. Possible target sectors and activities: Value added logistics Slide47:  Biomedical healthcare offers opportunities for growth: Long healthcare tradition in the region and hence skills availability Existing key industry with strong potential for innovation Strong biomedical healthcare research capabilities Specific strengths in experts areas, such as wound care Possibility for market driven investment (ageing population, large customer base) Large homogeneous population (for medical trials) UK track record and perception as a leading life sciences location Presence of key players (Smith and Nephew, Reckitt, Seven Seas) as ambassador for the region C. Possible target sectors and activities: Biomedical Healthcare Slide48:  Points of attention for developing biomedical healthcare are: Internationally, no specific unique competitive advantages exist that will easily attract biomedical investor’s attention for the region Perception as a biomedical research base is not strong internationally Most potential is likely to come from further developing local areas of expertise (such as wound care), stimulating spin offs, cooperation with business community Intensify cooperation with other centres of excellence in similar research Improvement of attractiveness of Hull is required to attract/retain talents Select key accounts in healthcare for after care service, with objective of business retention but also new business generation and investment Financial support for new start ups Competition for this sector is internationally very strong, hence the recommendation for an initial indigenous growth strategy focusing on unique areas of expertise C. Possible target sectors and activities: Biomedical Healthcare Slide49:  Renewable energy offers an opportunity in a new emerging sector Huge growth potential generally across Europe Ensuring a balance between existing strengths and new emerging sectors Underutilized potential in the UK Links with traditional agricultural society Links with the long energy tradition in the area Resource availability Advantages of the ports related to growth in biomass trade UK’s international recognition for various sub-sectors (biomass, wind) C. Possible target sectors and activities: Renewable energy Slide50:  Points of attention for growing the renewable energy sector are: Sector still is in pioneering phase; UK potential underutilized: opportunity for Hull to take a leading position Public acceptance may be an issue; political support needed Regional accessibility is key; infrastructure needs to be improved Partnership with universities and research centres required to further develop technologies Further research should be conducted to analyze the potential of various sub-sectors (bio-fuel, marine power, etc.). Competition for this sector will be both domestic and international, but Hull has opportunity to be a player from early stages on C. Possible target sectors and activities: Renewable energy Slide51:  For new inward investment in shared services centres Hull will face strong competition, both within the UK and internationally Some potential exists for domestic back offices As part of an After Care strategy, Hull should try to identify potential new projects with existing investors in the region, as existing sites are frequently a strong candidate for such operations (co-location) An intensive pro-active marketing approach focused on new inward/foreign investment is not recommended C. Possible target sectors and activities: Shared services centres Slide52:  Objective: perform a high level competitive assessment and identify potential target sectors, based on investor’s realistic location requirement and current competitive environment Three potential target sectors have been selected for further investigation: Hull should seek a balance between focusing on traditional sectors where local strengths exist and emerging sectors with long term potential Key issue will be to start with local initiatives to improve business environment and industry strengths, and gradually increase attractiveness for inward investors A pro-active after care strategy is recommended for working with existing key industries This document will be used as input for a subsequent IEDC Team visit and action plan Summary Slide53:  Roel Spee EMEA and Asia-Pacific Leader Office: + 32 2 416 5928 Mobile: + 32 475 915 832 E-mail: roel.spee@be.ibm.com Gene DePrez Americas Leader Office: + 1 973 726 4621 Mobile: + 1 201 874 8152 E-mail: gdeprez@us.ibm.com IBM-Plant Location International (IBM-PLI) Global Location Strategies Web-site: www.ibm.com/bcs/pli

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