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Published on January 19, 2008

Author: Domenica

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Hazardous Waste Management:  Hazardous Waste Management Waste Management Training:  Waste Management Training If you: add hazardous waste into an accumulation container determine if a material is hazardous waste transport waste from an accumulation area to a storage area or treatment room inspect hazardous waste storage areas perform treatment (solvent recovery or elementary neutralization) respond to spills involving hazardous wastes You must complete this training. Why manage hazardous waste?:  Why manage hazardous waste? To protect human health & the environment. To minimize the generation of hazardous waste. To meet or exceed compliance with the Resource Conservation & Recovery Act (RCRA). Congress has enacted as national policy the mandate that hazardous wastes MUST be treated, stored, and disposed of so as to minimize the present and future threat to human health and the environment…this is RCRA. What is RCRA?:  What is RCRA? The primary law governing the regulation of solid and hazardous waste. RCRA authorizes EPA to: regulate the generation, management, treatment, storage, transportation and disposal of hazardous wastes, solid wastes and underground storage tanks; and ensure compliance by enforcing regulatory violations discovered during inspections. What does RCRA do?:  What does RCRA do? RCRA’s core regulations establish a “cradle-to-grave” hazardous waste regulatory program through the following major sets of rules: Identification of hazardous wastes. Management requirements for generators; transporters; and treatment, storage and disposal facilities. Land disposal restrictions. Hazardous waste facility permitting. Training objectives:  Training objectives Learn how to safely manage chemical wastes. Learn hazardous waste management rules and what you need to do to ensure compliance. Learn the importance of personal protective equipment (PPE). Learn what actions to take in an emergency or spill involving hazardous waste. Learn the importance of hazardous waste minimization. State management of RCRA:  State management of RCRA New York is authorized to administer its hazardous waste management program in lieu of the federal program. The New York Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) hazardous waste regulations are set forth in 6 NYCRR Parts 370 - 376. With some exceptions, New York rules closely mirror the federal rules. Did you know that….:  Did you know that…. New York law provides civil and criminal penalties for violations of its environmental regulations. Environmental crimes can be punishable by up to $32,500 a day and/or imprisonment of 5 years. Identification of Hazardous Waste:  Identification of Hazardous Waste Hazardous Waste Identification:  Hazardous Waste Identification A solid, liquid, or aqueous waste which displays a “hazardous characteristic” or is specifically “listed” as hazardous waste. Waste is any “discarded material” that is not excluded from the definition of hazardous waste. Discarded Material is material that is “abandoned,” “recycled” or inherently “waste-like.” EPA views old chemicals that have not been used in years and which are unlikely to be used in the foreseeable future as waste. Hazardous Waste Identification:  Hazardous Waste Identification All hazardous waste generators must determine if the wastes they generate are hazardous by: Sampling and analyzing the waste using specified EPA test methods (or equivalent methods); or Applying knowledge of the composition of the waste and the process used to generate it. Hazardous Waste Identification:  Hazardous Waste Identification There are two categories of Hazardous Waste including: “Characteristic” Hazardous Wastes “Listed” Hazardous Wastes (EPA Title 40CFR 261, Subpart D) Characteristic Hazardous Wastes:  Characteristic Hazardous Wastes “Characteristic” Hazardous Waste displays at least one of the following four characteristics: Ignitable Corrosive Reactive Toxic Ignitable Hazardous Waste:  Ignitable Hazardous Waste Liquids and aqueous solutions with flash points less than 140°F. Solids capable of spontaneous combustion under normal temperature and pressure. Ignitable compressed gasses (including partially full aerosol cans). Oxidizers. Ignitable Hazardous Waste:  Ignitable Hazardous Waste Waste Code D001 Examples include waste: alcohols; acetone; acetic acid; xylene; coomassie and other stains; de-stains; oil paints; paint thinner; solvents and solvent mixtures; gasoline; partially full aerosol cans. Corrosive Hazardous Waste:  Corrosive Hazardous Waste Liquid and aqueous solutions with pH less than or equal to 2.0 or greater than or equal to 12.5. Waste Code D002 Examples: acids; bases; hydroxides; waste boiler treatment chemicals. Reactive Hazardous Waste :  Reactive Hazardous Waste Reacts violently with water. Generates toxic gasses or fumes. Explosives. Waste Code D003 Examples: cyanide; explosives; picric acid; ethyl ethers; sulfide-containing wastes. Toxic Hazardous Waste:  Toxic Hazardous Waste Waste displays the toxicity characteristic if it exceeds certain concentration levels using specified test methods. The toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) is the specified test method for determining if a waste is toxic hazardous waste. Toxic Hazardous Waste:  Toxic Hazardous Waste The Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) simulates the conditions in a landfill and then analyzes the concentrations of specifically listed chemicals and heavy metals that could potentially leach into the groundwater. Waste Codes D004 through D043 Toxic Hazardous Waste:  Toxic Hazardous Waste Examples of the most common toxic materials, their regulatory limits, and their corresponding waste codes are listed on the following two slides. NOTE: The 8 compounds that appear in boldface are referred to as the “RCRA 8 metals” and are among the most common toxic wastes found at Stony Brook University. Toxic Hazardous Waste:  Toxic Hazardous Waste Toxic Hazardous Waste:  Toxic Hazardous Waste “Listed” Hazardous Wastes:  “Listed” Hazardous Wastes Listed hazardous wastes are those wastes that have been specifically identified and listed in the regulations (EPA Title 40 CFR 261, Subpart D). The listings are based on the fact that the underlying constituents display at least one hazardous characteristic. To be classified as a listed waste, the waste must meet the listing exactly. Waste that does not meet a listing exactly is still hazardous waste if it displays one of the four characteristics… Ignitable – Corrosive – Reactive – Toxic “Listed” Hazardous Wastes:  “Listed” Hazardous Wastes There are four types of listed hazardous wastes. F – Solvent wastes P and U – Unused chemicals and products K – From specific industrial processes F-listed Wastes:  F-listed Wastes Chemicals or products that contain specifically listed constituents that are used for their solvent properties (e.g., to solubilize or mobilize one constituent from another) and generate any waste stream; or Specifically listed halogenated and non-halogenated solvents used for cleaning or degreasing. F-listed Wastes:  F-listed Wastes Examples: Most solvent wastes and mixtures (e.g., when acetone or methanol is used to rinse out a beaker or clean a paint brush, the waste is F003-listed hazardous waste); Solvent-contaminated rags that are saturated after use and not sent to an industrial launderer. Common F-listed constituents include: acetone; Benzene; methanol; toluene; xylene; 1,1,1-TCA; methylene chloride; MEK; and others. P- and U-Listed Wastes:  P- and U-Listed Wastes P- and U-listed wastes include old or unwanted chemicals or products that: Have not been used (can be located anywhere including: laboratories; hospital; stockrooms; art department; the print shop; maintenance areas; or trades shops). Contain only one active ingredient which is listed on either the U or P-lists. P- and U-Listed Wastes:  P- and U-Listed Wastes Does not include mixtures containing more than one active ingredient, or wastes containing P or U-listed constituents that have been used for their intended purposes. Example: if epinephrine has been administered to a patient and some remains in either a syringe or bag, it is not considered “unused” or a P-listed waste. Similarly, if osmium tetroxide is used in an experiment, the resulting waste would not be P-listed although it may display a hazardous characteristic. P- and U-Listed Wastes:  P- and U-Listed Wastes Residues, contaminated soil, water, and debris resulting from spills of unused listed chemicals. P-wastes are acute hazardous wastes. U-wastes are toxic or non-acute hazardous wastes. Waste Codes P001-P158 and U001-U359. K-listed Waste:  K-listed Waste Are generated only by specific industrial processes and sources. These wastes are industry-specific. Waste Codes K001-K136. Examples: Wastewater treatment sludge from the production of chrome yellow pigment. Distillation bottoms from aniline production. Emission control dust from mining operations. New York Listed Wastes:  New York Listed Wastes New York has identified waste containing concentrations equal to or greater than 50 parts per million (ppm) of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) as New York listed hazardous waste. Used Oil:  Used Oil Used oil must be managed in accordance with the Used Oil rules rather than hazardous waste rules unless it: Displays a hazardous characteristic (e.g., toxicity); Is mixed with a listed hazardous waste; Contains 50 ppm or greater PCBs; or Contains more than 1,000 ppm total halogens. Used oil meeting any of these criteria is hazardous waste. Mixture Rule:  Mixture Rule Any mixture of a listed waste with a non-hazardous waste becomes a listed hazardous waste (may also display a hazardous characteristic). Example: If a small amount of used solvent such as xylene, brake or carburetor cleaner, or acetone is mixed into a 55-gallon drum of anti-freeze or a large used oil tank, then the entire drum of anti-freeze or tank becomes and must be managed as a F-listed waste. Pharmaceutical Wastes:  Pharmaceutical Wastes Unused pharmaceuticals returned to the manufacturer through a reverse distributor are not considered to be waste. Pharmaceuticals remaining in a device that has been administered to a patient (through an injection or an IV) are not considered unused, and are therefore not U or P-listed wastes. Depending on the type of medication, they may display a hazardous characteristic, or meet the definition of radioactive or regulated medical waste. Common Hazardous Waste Exclusions and Exemptions:  Common Hazardous Waste Exclusions and Exemptions The following materials are not hazardous waste: Household wastes (this does NOT mean waste generated in the workplace can be taken home. Scrap metal that is sent off-site for recycling. Residues of hazardous waste in “empty” containers and the hazardous waste containers. Lead-acid batteries returned to a vendor. Expired medications returned to a reverse distributor. Hazardous Waste Generator Status:  Hazardous Waste Generator Status New York hazardous waste generators are subject to a range of different rules depending on their generator status. Generator status is based on hazardous waste generation rates and/or maximum volume of hazardous waste stored on-site at any one time. In New York there are 3 generator categories: Large Quantity Generator (LQG) Small Quantity Generator (SQG) Conditionally Exempt SQG (CESQG) Large Quantity Generators:  Large Quantity Generators New York facilities are classified as LQGs if they: Generate more than 2,200 lbs of hazardous waste in a calendar month; Generate more than 2.2 lbs of acute hazardous waste (P-waste) site-wide in a calendar month; Store more than 2.2 lbs of P-waste on site at any one time; or Store more than 13,200 lbs of hazardous waste on site at any one time. LQG Management Requirements:  LQG Management Requirements “Large-quantity” hazardous waste generators must: Have an EPA ID number. Evaluate every waste generated to determine if it is regulated as hazardous waste. Have a Hazardous Waste Contingency Plan. File an Annual Report. Attempt to Enter into Agreements with Emergency Responders. LQG Hazardous Waste Storage Requirements:  LQG Hazardous Waste Storage Requirements Store hazardous waste for no longer than 90 days Each hazardous waste storage area (i.e., 90-day area) must be labeled with the words DANGER HAZARDOUS WASTE Unauthorized Personnel Keep Out The sign should be visible from 25 feet away. HAZARDOUS WASTE Unauthorized Personnel Keep Out Equipment for 90-Day Storage Area :  Equipment for 90-Day Storage Area Internal communication or alarm system. Telephone or two-way radio capable of summoning assistance from the Fire Department, Police Department, or emergency response teams. Fire extinguishers, fire control equipment, spill kits, and decontamination equipment. Water at adequate volume and pressure. Adequate aisle space to allow for the unobstructed movement of personnel and equipment (i.e., 36 inches around containers). Emergency Posting:  Emergency Posting The following information must be posted next to the telephone in the 90-day storage areas: Name and telephone number of the emergency coordinator. Telephone number of the fire department. Location of the nearest fire extinguisher, spill kits, and fire alarm. Waste Container Requirements:  Waste Container Requirements Waste containers must be: Compatible with the contents. Labeled with the words “Hazardous Waste” and other words that identify the contents (no abbreviations or chemical formulas are allowed). Kept closed when not being filled or emptied. Sound and free of leaks (waste from leaking containers must be transferred to another container). Correct Waste Container Storage Requirements:  Waste Container Storage Requirements Containers must be stored: So labels are visible for inspection. Segregated from incompatible wastes, radioactive, and regulated medical waste. Using secondary containment to separate wastes and contain spills. Storage Area Inspection Requirements:  Storage Area Inspection Requirements Inspect hazardous waste storage areas at least weekly to: Detect leaking and deteriorating containers; Ensure that containers are labeled, dated, and closed; Ensure wastes are not accumulated for longer than 90 days; Ensure all emergency equipment is present and in good working order; and Ensure that incompatible wastes are separated. Hazardous Waste Shipping Requirements:  Hazardous Waste Shipping Requirements Label and package wastes in accordance with DOT rules prior to shipment. Use a licensed hazardous waste transporter to ship hazardous waste off-site to a licensed, authorized hazardous waste TSD facility. Ship hazardous waste using a hazardous waste manifest, and keep copies of manifests on-site for at least three years. Complete a Land Disposal Restriction Form and send with each hazardous waste shipment. File an exception report with DEC if the receiving facility manifest copy is not received within 45 days of the waste leaving the facility. Waste Handling Requirements:  Waste Handling Requirements Before transporting wastes to the 90 day storage area: A waste manifest must be filled out by the waste generator (all manifest information is required, keep a copy for your records). Seal containers to prevent leakage. Move containers, in segregated secondary containment, to a suitable transport device (cart, hand truck, wagon). Do not overload carts, etc. Training Requirements:  Training Requirements Personnel whose job responsibilities include handling, generating or manifesting hazardous waste must be thoroughly familiar with proper waste handling and emergency procedures relevant to their responsibilities during normal facility operations and emergencies. These requirements are being met with today’s training. Training Documentation:  Training Documentation Maintain records indicating the job title for each position at the facility related to hazardous waste management and the name of the employee filling each position; Maintain a written job description for each position at the facility related to hazardous waste management; and Maintain a written description of the type and amount of both introductory and continuing training that is given to each person related to hazardous waste management. Satellite Accumulation Area (SAA) Management Rules:  Satellite Accumulation Area (SAA) Management Rules LQGs can accumulate up to 55-gallons of hazardous waste or one quart of acute hazardous waste “at or near the point of generation” in “Satellite Accumulation Areas” without regard to the 90-Day Storage Area requirements provided the requirements described on the next four slides are met. Note that DEC interprets “at or near” to mean in the same room. If a SAA is accessed through a door that can be closed (even if it is never closed), then it is not “at or near” the point of generation. SAA Container Management Rules:  SAA Container Management Rules SAA containers must be: In good condition. Compatible with the waste. “Closed,” except when waste is being added or removed (this includes HPLC waste collection containers). Managed to prevent leakage. Labeled with the words “Hazardous Waste,” and with other words identifying the contents. SAA Container Management Rules:  SAA Container Management Rules Containers must be: Moved to a 90-day storage area within 72 hours (3 days) of the 55-gallon or one quart limits being exceeded. Dated as soon as the 55-gallon or 1 quart (P-waste) limit is reached, or as soon as the container is moved to one of the 90-day storage areas, whichever occurs first. Filling out the hazardous waste label correctly…:  Filling out the hazardous waste label correctly… Chemical name must be written in English. Do NOT use chemical formulas or abbreviations Date only when waste container is moved to storage area or there is 55 gallons in the SAA. Waste Handling Prohibitions:  Waste Handling Prohibitions NO hazardous wastes may be: dumped down the drain discharged to a sanitary sewer discarded with regular garbage allowed to evaporate to the atmosphere. Waste Handling Practices:  Waste Handling Practices Disposal of waste gasses: Contact suppliers for pickup of cylinders. Do not dispose of gasses by bleeding to atmosphere. Waste Handling Practices:  Waste Handling Practices During Chemical Transport: Have spill clean-up material readily available. Remove, but carry, appropriate PPE. Use freight elevator or limit access to elevators. Avoid crowded and public areas, if possible. Disposal of Empty Containers:  Disposal of Empty Containers All containers must be triple rinsed before disposal (if the container held a P-listed chemical, then dispose of the container as hazardous waste). Deface label and mark “triple rinsed.” If the container held a strong-smelling material, rinse with an appropriate solvent. If the cleaning solvent is a hazardous material, collect & dispose of as a hazardous waste. Recycle glass, bottles and cans where possible. Disposal of Empty Containers:  Disposal of Empty Containers If the container held pourable materials, it must be emptied such that no material can be drained from the container. If the container held non-pourable materials, no materials can remain that can feasibly be removed by physical means. Under no circumstances may a container labeled with the international radioactive symbol or with the words “Hazardous Waste” be disposed of in the regular trash. Remove labels or mark out information that does not represent the actual contents of the container. Disposal of Non-Hazardous Waste:  Disposal of Non-Hazardous Waste Before putting a non-hazardous substance in the trash that might be mistaken for a laboratory chemical… Seal the substance in a plastic bag. Label the bag with the package contents and the words “non-hazardous.” Put a note on the bag reading: “For questions, contact ________.” Disposal of Special Waste:  Disposal of Special Waste Asbestos, lead, and radioactive wastes require special handling. Use the contact information below to make arrangements for proper removal and disposal of these materials. EH&S @ 2-6410 Special Hazardous Wastes :  Special Hazardous Wastes Universal Wastes A category of “less” regulated wastes. Universal Waste must be collected and disposed of separately from other waste. Examples are: Lead-acid, nickel/cadmium, lithium and mercury batteries (not alkaline) Mercury reostats/ballist Fluorescent bulbs (contain mercury) High Intensity Discharge (HID) lamps Universal Waste Lamps Stony Brook University Stony Brook, NY 117794 (631) 632-6410 Date ______ Sample Label Used Fluorescent Bulbs:  Used Fluorescent Bulbs Used fluorescent bulbs may contain: Mercury Pack used bulbs in original box. Close the box or container. Put universal waste label & date box when first lamp is placed inside. Notify your supervisor when box is full. Contact Your supervisor for disposal of other universal wastes. Sample Label Universal Waste Lamps Stony Brook University Stony Brook, NY 11794 (631) 632-6410 Date ______ Do not allow this to occur:  Do not allow this to occur Emergency Procedures:  Emergency Procedures Emergency Procedures:  Emergency Procedures All chemical spills, leaks, fires or other uncontrolled releases must be immediately reported to EH&S by notifying University Police @ 911/632-3333 on cell phones. If there is a fire, immediately pull the fire alarm, begin evacuation, and contact University Police from a safe location. Emergency Procedures…:  Emergency Procedures… Chemical splashes to the eyes… Immediately flush eyes with copious amounts of water for 15 minutes Assist the employee Always seek medical attention afterwards Emergency Procedures…:  Emergency Procedures… Chemical splashes to the body… Immediately remove contaminated clothing and flush area with copious amounts of water for 15 minutes Assist the employee Always seek medical attention afterwards Chemical Spills :  Chemical Spills When assessing the spill, consider: the size of the spill the toxicity of the material physical hazards of the material availability of clean-up materials knowledge and training of the person doing the clean-up It is important that spills of hazardous waste and materials are cleaned appropriately by trained personnel. Before attempting to clean a spill, take the following information into account. Chemical Spills :  Chemical Spills You may clean up small spills (less than 1 gallon) if: you have the supplies to absorb and bag the spilled material; you are familiar with the properties of the spilled materials; you have the proper personal protective equipment (PPE); spilled acids or bases are dilute; solvents are in a well ventilated area; Does NOT involve radioactive materials; You can do the cleanup safely. Waste Minimization:  Waste Minimization Waste Minimization:  Waste Minimization Stony Brook University is committed to Waste Minimization – reducing the amount of hazardous waste that is generated by using the following methods: Source reduction Reuse Recycle Reclaim Treat Source Reduction:  Source Reduction Substitute non-hazardous or less toxic chemicals for hazardous ones. Use smaller quantities in your process by reducing the overall size of the process or apparatus. Do not order more than you need for scheduled work. Source Reduction - Substitutions:  Source Reduction - Substitutions Reuse / Recycling:  Reuse / Recycling Reuse: Do not dispose of chemicals that can be reused. Recycling: Consider purchasing a solvent recycler if you generate waste solvent that could be redistilled and recycled, i.e. xylene recycler in Pathology. Reclamation:  Reclamation If your waste contains precious materials, your waste stream may be a valuable byproduct (i.e. silver recovery systems). Consider installation of a reclamation program. Reclamation:  Reclamation Certain wastes can be sent to a commercial recycling facility, i.e.: lead-acid batteries fluorescent lamps used oil waste mercury safety-Kleen solvent Treatment:  Treatment Detoxification of end-products by a Principal Investigator, if feasible, is preferred to sending waste off-site for disposal. Elementary neutralization (pH adjustment) to reduce the toxicity of a chemical Deionizer Resin Regeneration Ethidium Bromide Neutralization Gluteraldehyde Neutralization Ethyl Oxide Neutralization Don’t Mix Wastes:  Don’t Mix Wastes Only mix wastes after approval of EH&S to do so. Mixed Wastes: It is much easier to dispose of individual wastes streams. Do not mix hazardous waste with radioactive, other hazardous, non-hazardous, or Regulated Medical Wastes. Do not mix halogenated with non-halogenated solvents. Do not mix solvents with aqueous waste. Multimedia Pollution:  Multimedia Pollution Do not transfer waste from one media to another. Evaporating waste solvent in a hood transfers waste to the air. Washing solid waste down the drain transfers waste to water. Test:  Test Slide80:  TEST - Question 1 Only trained personnel may handle hazardous waste. Yes ____ or No ____ Test – Question 2:  Test – Question 2 True or False Hazardous wastes may be dumped down the drain. True ____ or False ____ Test – Question 3:  Test – Question 3 Select the correct answer (a, b, c, d, or e). Waste containers must be: Labeled. Closed when not being filled. Dated when the 55-gallon limit is reached or the container is moved to a storage area. Labeled with the words “Hazardous Waste” and other words that identify the contents. All of the above. Test – Question 4:  Test – Question 4 True or False Solvent waste can display a hazardous waste characteristic and be listed hazardous waste. True ____ or False ____ Test – Question 5:  Test – Question 5 Select the answer (a, b, c, d or e). Which of the following must be handled as hazardous waste? Broken Fluorescent lamps. Spent lead/acid batteries. Waste chemotherapy drugs. Spent nickel/cadmium batteries. All of the above. Test – Question 6:  Test – Question 6 Select the correct answer (a, b, c, d or e). You may clean up a spill if: You are prepared and familiar with the spilled material. You have the proper PPE. You have supplies to absorb the spill. Spilled materials are dilute. All of the above. Test – Question 7:  Test – Question 7 Select the correct answer (a, b, c, d or e). Which of the following is not a hazardous waste? An old container of methanol that has been on your shelf for years which no one will ever use. Small scraps of waste silver solder being sent out for recycling. Waste acetone from cleaning a beaker. Small amount of paint thinner that was used to clean a paint brush. Waste developer with a silver concentration of 5.1 ppm. Test – Question 8:  Test – Question 8 Fill in The Blank: To report a hazardous waste spill, fire or other emergency contact University Police by dialing _ _ _ or _ _ _ - _ _ _ _. Test – Question 9:  Test – Question 9 True or False Used fluorescent bulbs must be kept in a closed container. True ____ or False ____ Test – Question 10:  Test – Question 10 Which of the following is an example of reducing Hazardous Waste at the source? Limit the amount you order. Do not stockpile chemicals. Rotate stocks to use chemicals before shelf-life expires. Keep up-to-date inventories and avoid ordering chemicals you already have. All of the above. CONGRATULATIONS!:  CONGRATULATIONS! You have successfully completed Hazardous Waste Management Training.

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