how do i know wetland

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Information about how do i know wetland
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Published on January 3, 2008

Author: Arundel0

Source: authorstream.com

How Do I Know If There Is a Wetland Where I Want To Build?:  How Do I Know If There Is a Wetland Where I Want To Build? James Robb, Chief Wetlands & Storm Water Section Indiana Department of Environmental Management Who Regulates What?:  Who Regulates What? Public Freshwater Lake: IDNR, USACE & IDEM Navigable Water: USACE, IDEM, IDNR Non-wetland floodway: IDNR Floodway wetland: USACE, IDEM & IDNR Adjacent wetland: USACE & IDEM <1 sq mile contrib. area: USACE & IDEM Isolated wetland: IDEM Tributary: IDNR, USACE & IDEM How Do I Know If There’s a Wetland Where I Want to Build? :  How Do I Know If There’s a Wetland Where I Want to Build? How to know if a professional should look at the site? Professional Recon – An inexpensive but cursory evaluation of a site Professional Delineation – A detailed evaluation of a site in which the boundary of any wetland is marked Agency Verification – Evaluation of a delineation by the US Army Corps of Engineers How can I tell if a professional should look at my site?:  How can I tell if a professional should look at my site? Step 1 – walk the site in spring Step 2 – look at the plants Step 3 – look at a soils map Step 4 – look at the National Wetland Inventory Step 5 – look at aerial photography Step 1: Walk the Site in the Spring:  Step 1: Walk the Site in the Spring Walk the site in the Spring preferably a day or two after a heavy rain. Are there areas with standing water? Are there areas where water squishes out of the ground when you step on it? If you answer yes to either of these questions then hire a professional to determine if there are wetlands. Step 2: Look at the Plants :  Step 2: Look at the Plants Walk the site between May and October and look for wetland plants. If you see an area with these plants then a professional should look at the site. Very Wet Wetland Plants:  Very Wet Wetland Plants If you see any of these then contact a professional Arrowhead Cattail Buttonbush Bulrush Willow Common Wetland Trees:  Common Wetland Trees Common Wetland Plants:  Common Wetland Plants Some dogwoods Common Wetland Plants :  Common Wetland Plants Reed Canary Grass Common Wetland Plants:  Common Wetland Plants Sedges Common Wetland Plants:  Common Wetland Plants Common Reed (aka Phragmites) Common Wetland Plants:  Common Wetland Plants Rushes Common Wetland Plants:  Common Wetland Plants Spikerush Common Wetland Plants:  Common Wetland Plants Smartweeds Common Wetland Plants:  Common Wetland Plants Beggarticks Common Wetland Plants:  Common Wetland Plants Bugleweeds/horehounds Step 3 – Look at a Soil Map:  Step 3 – Look at a Soil Map The Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) has maps on their website Unfortunately these maps are often difficult to interpret We recommend that you go to your County NRCS or Soil and Water Conservation District (SWCD) office and ask to use a book called a Soil Survey. The extension agent, NRCS staff or Farm Service Agency (FSA) staff should all be able to help you identify the soils on your property. If any of these soils are a type that the NRCS has determined is “hydric” or containing hydric inclusions then have a professional look at the site. Note that wetlands are sometimes found in areas that are not mapped as “hydric.” You can find out more information at http://www.in.nrcs.usda.gov/ Step 4 – Look at the National Wetland Inventory (NWI):  Step 4 – Look at the National Wetland Inventory (NWI) Many of Indiana’s wetlands were mapped in the 1980’s by the US Fish and Wildlife Service. You can find these maps at http://wetlandsfws.er.usgs.gov/wtlnds/launch.html If USFWS mapped a wetland on or near the site then a professional should look at it Many wetlands are not mapped USFWS. 2006. The Wetlands Master Geodatabase Annual Report 2006 Step 5 – Look at Aerial Photos:  Step 5 – Look at Aerial Photos If you see dark spots on aerial photos contact a professional to look at the site You can access the latest aerial photography at http://www.indiana.edu/~gisdata/ Local FSA offices often have aerial photography available as well Wetland Professional Recon:  Professional Recon Desktop review NWI maps Soil maps Aerial photos Topographic maps Walk the site Cost ranges from $500 to $2000 depending on the consulting firm and site conditions. Many environmental consultants offer a service in which they do a cursory review of the site before conducting a more thorough (and costly) delineation. This is sometimes called a “determination” or an “evaluation.” Professional Delineation:  Professional Delineation Marking the boundaries of the wetland on your property is called a “delineation. Regulated wetlands must meet three conditions: More wetland plants than upland plants Indicators that water has been at or just below the surface of the soil Wetland soil Professional Delineation cont.:  Professional Delineation cont. The professional will document the plants that grow in the area Professional Delineation cont.:  Professional Delineation cont. The professional will dig a hole and describe the soil Professional Delineation cont.:  Professional Delineation cont. The professional will look for signs that water was at or just below the surface USACE Agency Verification:  Agency Verification The US Army Corps of Engineers Verifies determinations and delineations for wetlands, streams, lakes and other waters in Indiana. Determines if a wetland is isolated. Indiana Dept. of Environmental Management Verifies determinations, delineations and exemptions for isolated wetlands. USACE determines which wetlands are isolated. A delineation is not “official” until verified by the regulatory agencies Need more help?:  Need more help? Give IDEM a call! (800)451-6027 More contact info at http://www.in.gov/idem/programs/water/401/staff.html Call the Corps Louisville: (513)315-6733 Indianapolis: (317)532-4198 South Bend: (574)232-1952

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