How Containers and Microservices Help Local Governments in Norway Provide a Common Platform for Safe Public Data Distribution

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Information about How Containers and Microservices Help Local Governments in Norway...

Published on April 29, 2018

Author: danalgardner

Source: slideshare.net

1. Page 1 of 5 How Containers and Microservices Help Local Governments in Norway Provide a Common Platform for Safe Public Data Distribution Transcript of a discussion on how hyper-converged infrastructure and microservices help municipalities in Norway gain an efficient common pool for storing and sharing sensitive healthcare data. Listen to the podcast. Find it on iTunes. Get the mobile app. Download the transcript. Sponsor: Hewlett Packard Enterprise. Dana Gardner: Hello, and welcome to the next edition of the BriefingsDirect Voice of the Customer podcast series. I’m Dana Gardner, Principal Analyst at Interarbor Solutions, your host and moderator for this ongoing discussion on digital transformation success stories. Stay with us now to learn how agile businesses are fending off disruption -- in favor of innovation. Our next public sector digital transformation success story examines how local governments in Norway benefit from a common platform approach for safe and efficient public data distribution. We’ll now learn how Norway’s 18 counties are gaining a common shared pool for data on young people’s health and other sensitive information thanks to streamlined benefits of hyper-converged infrastructure (HCI), containers and microservices. Here to help us discover the benefits of a modern platform for smarter government data sharing is Frode Sjovatsen, Head of Development for FINT Project in Norway. Welcome, Frode. Frode Sjovatsen: Thank you. Gardner: What is driving interest in having a common platform for public information in your country? Sjovatsen: We need interactions between the government and the community to be more efficient. So we needed to build the infrastructure that supports automatic solutions for citizens. That’s the main driver. Sjovatsen

2. Page 2 of 5 Gardner: What problems do you need to overcome in order to create a more common approach? Common API at the core Sjovatsen: One of the biggest issues is [our users] buy business applications such as human resources for school administrators to use and everyone is happy. They have a nice user interface on the data. But when we need to use that data across all the other processes -- that’s where the problem is. And that’s what the FINT project is all about. [Due to apps heterogeneity] we then need to have developers create application programming interfaces (APIs), and it costs a lot of money, and it is of variable quality. What we’re doing now is creating a common API that’s horizontal -- for all of those business applications. It gives us the ability to use our data much more efficiently. Gardner: Please describe for us what the FINT project is and why this is so important for public health. Sjovatsen: It’s all about taking the power back, regarding the information we’ve handed the vendors. There is an initiative in Norway where the government talks about getting control of all the information. And the thought behind the FINT project is that we need to get ahold of all the information, describe it, define it, and then make it available via APIs -- both for public use and also for internal use. Gardner: What sort of information are we dealing with here? Why is it important for the general public health? Learn More About HPE Pointnext Services Sjovatsen: It’s all kinds of information. For example, it’s school information, such as about how the everyday processes run, the schedules, the grades, and so on. All of that data is necessary to create good services, for the teachers and students. We also want to make that data available so that we can build new innovations from businesses that want to create new and better solutions for us. Gardner: When you were tasked with creating this platform, why did you seek an API- driven, microservices-based architecture? What did you look for to maintain simplicity and cost efficiency in the underlying architecture and systems? The thought behind the FINT project is that we need to get ahold of all the information, describe it, define it, and then make it available via APIs -- both for public use and also for internal use.

3. Page 3 of 5 Agility, scalability, and speed Sjovatsen: We needed something that was agile so that we can roll out updates continuously. We also needed a way to roll back quickly, if something fails. The reason we are running this on one of the county council’s datacenters is we wanted to separate it from their other production environments. We need to be able to scale these services quickly. When we talked to Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE), the solution they suggested was using HCI. Learn More About HPE Pointnext Services Gardner: Where are you in the deployment and what have been some of the benefits of such a hyper-converged approach? Sjovatsen: We are in the late stage of testing and we’re going into production in early 2018. At the moment, we’re looking into using HPE SimpliVity. Container comfort Gardner: Containers are an important part of moving toward automation and simplicity for many people these days. Is that another technology that you are comfortable with and, if so, why? Sjovatsen: Yes, definitely. We are very comfortable with that. The biggest reason is that when we use containers, we isolate the application; the whole container is the application and we are able to test the code before it goes into production. That’s one of the main drivers. The second reason is that it’s easy to roll out and it’s easy to roll back. We also have developers in and out of the project, and containers make it easy for them to quickly get in to the environment they are working on. It’s not that much work if they need to install on another computer to get a working environment running. Gardner: A lot of IT organizations are trying to reduce the amount of money and time they spend on maintaining existing applications, so they can put more emphasis into creating new applications. How do containers, microservices and API-driven services help you flip from an emphasis on maintenance to an emphasis on innovation? When we use containers, we isolate the application; the whole container is the application and we are able to test the code before it goes into production.

4. Page 4 of 5 Sjovatsen: The container approach is very close to the DevOps environment, so the time from code to production is very small compared to what we did before when we had some operations guys installing the stuff on servers. Now, we have a very rapid way to go from code to production. Gardner: With the success of the FINT Project, would you consider extending this to other types of data and applications in other public sector activities or processes? If your success here continues, is this a model that you think has extensibility into other public sector applications? Unlocking the potential Sjovatsen: Yes, definitely. At the moment, there are 18 county councils in this project. We are just beginning to introduce this to all of the 400 municipalities. So that’s the next step. Those are the same data sets that we want to share or extend. But there are also initiatives with central registers in Norway and we will add value to those using our approach in the next year or so. Gardner: That could have some very beneficial impacts, very good payoffs. Sjovatsen: Yes, it could. There are other uses. For example, in Oslo we have made an API extend over the locks on many doors. So, we can now have one API to open multiple locking systems. So that’s another way to use this approach. Gardner: It shows the wide applicability of this. Any advice, Frode, for other organizations that are examining more of a container, DevOps, and API-driven architecture approach? What might you tell them as they consider taking this journey? Learn More About HPE Pointnext Services Sjovatsen: I definitely recommend it -- it’s simple and agile. The main thing with containers is to separate the storage from the applications. That’s probably what we worked on the most to make it scalable. We wrote the application so it’s scalable, and we separated the data from the presentation layer. Gardner: I’m afraid we’ll have to leave it there. We’ve been exploring how local governments in Norway are benefiting from a common platform approach to public data distribution. And we have learned about the benefits of using containers to create and integrate more applications in a cost-effective manner. In Oslo we have made an API extend over the locks on many doors. So, we can now have one API to open multiple locking systems.

5. Page 5 of 5 So please join me in thanking our guest, Frode Sjovatsen, Head of Development for the FINT Project in Norway. Sjovatsen: Thank you for having me. Gardner: And a big thank you to our audience as well for joining us for this BriefingsDirect Voice of the Customer digital transformation success story. I’m Dana Gardner, Principal Analyst at Interarbor Solutions, your host for this ongoing series of Hewlett Packard Enterprise-sponsored interviews. Thanks again for listening. Please pass this content along to your IT community, and do come back next time. Listen to the podcast. Find it on iTunes. Get the mobile app. Download the transcript. Sponsor: Hewlett Packard Enterprise. Transcript of a discussion on how hyper-converged infrastructure and microservices help municipalities in Norway gain an efficient common pool for storing and sharing sensitive healthcare data. Copyright Interarbor Solutions, LLC, 2005-2018. All rights reserved. You may also be interested in: • Ericsson and HPE accelerate digital transformation via customizable mobile business infrastructure stacks • How VMware, HPE, and Telefonica together bring managed cloud services to a global audience • IoT capabilities open new doors for Miami telecoms platform provider Identidad IoT • How Nokia refactors the video delivery business with new time-managed IT financing models • Retail gets a makeover thanks to data-driven insights, edge computing, and revamped user experiences • As enterprises face mounting hybrid IT complexity, new management solutions beckon • How a large Missouri medical center developed an agile healthcare infrastructure security strategy • Get ready for the Post-Cloud World • Philips teams with HPE on ecosystem approach to improve healthcare informatics-driven outcome • Inside story: How Ormuco abstracts the concepts of private and public cloud across the globe

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