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Healthy and Active Ageing

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Information about Healthy and Active Ageing

Published on June 19, 2017

Author: AgeingBetter

Source: slideshare.net

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1. Healthy and active ageing Anna Dixon, Chief Executive Royal College of Occupational Therapists Annual Conference 19 June 2017

2. Outline - About the Centre for Ageing Better - What matters to a good later life? - What do we mean by healthy and active ageing? - Building intrinsic function – strength and balance - Why strength and balance matters? What works? What needs to change? - Creating an enabling environment – housing and neighbourhoods - Why suitable housing matters? What works? What needs to change? - How can we work with OTs to bring about these changes?

3. 3 We work for a society where everybody enjoys a good later life An independent charitable foundation We are funded by an endowment from the Big Lottery Fund We are part of the network of What Works organisations that promote the better use of evidence About us

4. We bring about change to improve later lives We develop, share and apply evidence to help people age better We bring fresh thinking to the challenges and opportunities that everyone faces as more people live longer Our mission 4

5. What’s important to a good later life? 5 Health Financial security Social connections People say… Expectations are modest Personal outlook matters Wide variation in how people experience later life

6. We want more people to say… 6 “I feel prepared for later life” I feel confident managing major life changes I have made plans for my later life I have the skills I need for later life

7. 7 “I am active and connected” I am in fulfilling work and/or I am making a contribution to my community I have regular social contact with other people and some close relationships I keep physically and mentally healthy and active We want more people to say…

8. 8 “I feel in control” I live in a suitable home and neighbourhood I have care, support and services that help me live my life We want more people to say…

9. - WHO defines the objectives of healthy ageing as: - enjoy supportive, adapted social environments; - have access to high-quality, tailor- made, well-coordinated health and social services; - are supported in maintaining maximum health and functional capacity throughout their lives; and - are empowered to live and die in dignity. What is healthy ageing?

10. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 65-69 70-74 75-79 80-84 85+ Men: Needed help with ADLs vs Received Help Needed help 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 65-69 70-74 75-79 80-84 85+ Women: Needed help with ADLs vs Received Help Needed help Source: Health Survey for England (2015)

11. 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 65-69 70-74 75-79 80-84 85+ Men: Needed help with ADLs vs Received help Needed help Received help 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 65-69 70-74 75-79 80-84 85+ Women: Needed help with ADLs vs Received help Needed help Received help Source: Health Survey for England (2015)

12. The importance of strength & balance Keeping physically active

13. 8% From the age of 40, adults lose 8% of their muscle mass per decade. This increases to 15% once over 70. 1 in 5 More than 1 in 5 (21%) of all adults over the age of 85 suffer from sarcopenia. One third Every year, almost one third of older adults fall (30% of those aged 65 and over and 50% of those aged 80 and over). Loss in muscle mass and strength

14. 4 million Falls and fractures in people aged 65 and over account for over 4 million hospital bed days each year in England £2 billion The healthcare costs associated with fragility fractures is estimated at £2 billion per year. 24% Once someone has fractured a bone, only 24% of people return to their previous level of movement and independence The impact of falls on the NHS and the individual

15. - Improve body balance and muscle structure in older people - Reduce the risk of falls by up to 55% - Is beneficial both in terms of preventing and treating frailty - Can significantly improve knee joint pain among older adults - Has positive effects on risk factors for cardiovascular disorders, cancer, Type 2 diabetes and osteoporosis Effectiveness of strength and balance training can:

16. Who does strength and balancing exercise? 10% of men and 4% of women aged 75-84 years meet the guidelines for muscle-strengthening activity Age group Age group None <2 days/week At least 2 days/week (meets guidelines) Women 16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 85+ % Men 16-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75-84 85+ 0 20 40 60 80 100 From: Health Survey for England - 2012

17. Fall Consensus Statement 18

18. - We are working with Public Health England, NHS England, and others to increase awareness and uptake of strength and balance activity. This includes contributing to and supporting the National Falls Prevention Coordination Group. - We are funding research to review the evidence on the health benefits of strength and balance exercise, the type and extent of activity that makes the most difference, and what are the key barriers and enablers. What is the Centre for Ageing Better doing?

19. Physical activity: strength and balance https://youtu.be/YR9NlD0C1X0

20. The role of home adaptations Living in a suitable home and neighbourhood

21. 25

22. The impact of poor quality housing on health is similar to that of smoking or alcohol

23. Accessible housing is not adequate - 1.8 million disabled people have an accessible housing need - Shortage of accessible homes –7% meet basic accessibility features - Government introduced accessible housing standards to Building Regulations– but ‘visitable’ default is inadequate - Not clear whether the new standards have helped increase the supply of accessible homes – no record available

24. What are Ageing Better working on?

25. What is the Centre for Ageing Better doing? - Evidence review: We have commissioned the University of the West of England, Bristol and the Building Research Establishment to conduct a review of the evidence into how home adaptations can contribute to a good later life. - Primary research: We are commissioning primary research to gather evidence from practitioners who carry out assessments for home adaptations as well as people who have adapted their homes. - Call for practice: We will put out a call for practice to better understand the processes through which people receive funding for home adaptations, particularly through the Disabled Facilities Grant.

26. Centre for Ageing Better Angel Building, Level 3 407 St John Street, London, EC1V 4AD 020 3829 0113 www.ageing-better.org.uk Registered Company Number: 8838490 & Charity Registration Number: 1160741 ANNA DIXON Anna.Dixon@ageing-better.org.uk @DrAnnaDixon @Ageing_Better

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