Guest talk on "why sustainable design & what now" to Kingston University MA Sustainable Design Students 2014

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Information about Guest talk on "why sustainable design & what now" to Kingston University...
Design

Published on March 7, 2014

Author: FrankOConnor3

Source: slideshare.net

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The why & what now of ecodesign/sustainable design

sustainable design why? what next? what now? @frank_oconnor talk to MA Sustainable Design 2013/14 Kingston University February 2014

Nan-­‐in,  a  Japanese  master  during  the  Meiji   era  (1868-­‐1912),  received  a  university   professor  who  came  to  inquire  about  Zen.   Nan-­‐in  served  tea.  He  poured  his  visitor's  cup   full,  and  then  kept  on  pouring.     The  professor  watched  the  overflow  unLl  he   no  longer  could  restrain  himself.  "It  is   overfull.  No  more  will  go  in!"     "Like  this  cup,"  Nan-­‐in  said,  "you  are  full  of   your  own  opinions  and  speculaLons.  How  can   I  show  you  Zen  unless  you  first  empty  your   cup?"     hSp://www.zenguide.com  

to  believe  in  something,   and  not  to  live  it,     is  dishonest.     Mahatma  Gandhi  

… The times of thoughtless design, which can only flourish in times of thoughtless production for thoughtless consumption, are over. We cannot afford any more thoughtlessness. source:  Dieter  Rams  

… The times of thoughtless design, which can only flourish in times of thoughtless production for thoughtless consumption, are over. We cannot afford any more thoughtlessness. source:  Dieter  Rams  

so what happened between 1976 and 2013?

 …we  conLnue  to  live  in  a  throwaway  society.   image source: www.castlereagh.gov.uk    ..  yet  there  is  sLll  no  away.    

source:    Edwin  Datschefski  &  United   NaLons  University   98% of products are thrown away within 6 months.  image source: ads-ngo.com

… paradox ..throwing away is cheaper than recycling Ramon Arratia, Sustainability Director at Interface, E:DN Event, Cardiff …. but is it really?

       we  conLnue  to  over  consume.  

we  see  even  more  of  a  disconnect   between  people  …..  and  between   planet  and  people.   Image  source:  Banksy  

..  and  true  costs  conLnue  not  to  be  accounted  for.   source: http://www.realcycle.co.uk

every  product   tells  a  story  J   source: Nathan Hallett

source: Warwick Business School published in The Guardian, 26th June 2013

good design is a behaviour. we  con6nue  to  experience  a   collec6ve  unconscious  behaviour  …..   with  catastrophic  unintended   consequences.  

good design is a behaviour. we  con6nue  to  experience  a   collec6ve  unconscious  behaviour  …..   with  catastrophic  unintended   consequences.  

air  pollu6on  kills  3  million   people  each  year,  mostly  in   poor  countries      responsibility      polluLon   source: WHO / BBC

between  100  and  1000  species   become  ex6nct  each  year,   because  their  habitats  are   changing  or  being  destroyed.        responsibility      degradaLon   source: UK Government

over  1  billion  people  do  not   have  access  to  clean  drinking   water      responsibility      access  to  water   source: UNDP

water access 3800 children die each day from diseases associated with lack of access to safe drinking water, inadequate sanitation and poor hygiene  responsibility      access  to  water    source: UN / flickr

80%  of  all  disease  in  developing   countries  is  caused  by   consump6on  of  contaminated   water      responsibility      access  to  water   source: WHO

 responsibility      health  

‘commandments  of     industrialised  society’     1)  create  more  desire  (perceived  needs)   2)  thou  shalt  consume  (=  good  life)     culture  of  consumpLon  +  devaluing  of  culture     source:  Henry  1949  cited  in  Jones  1987  

‘commandments  of     industrialised  society’     1)  create  more  desire  (perceived  needs)   2)  thou  shalt  consume  (=  good  life)     culture  of  consumpLon  +  devaluing  of  culture     source:  Henry  1949  cited  in  Jones  1987  

There are professions more harmful than industrial design, but only a very few of them. And possibly only one profession is phonier. Advertising design, in persuading people to buy things they don‘t need, with money they don’t have, in order to impress others who don‘t care, is probably the phoniest field in existence today Victor Papanek, Design for the Real World: Human Ecology and Social Change, Thames and Hudson, 1984

does  the  concept  of  a  future   sLll  exist  in  a  culture  which  a   coherent  vision  has   disappeared?     Marcel  Wanders    

real need? iPoSy   banana  guard   source: miscell. web sites

knowledge through practice over time foolishness wisdom source: from a presentation by Emma Dewberry 2008 to the Ecodesign Centre & partners

  illustraLon:  Nathan  HalleS  

  …...individuals  act  primarily  on  issues  that  impact   their  personal  well-­‐being,  their  family,  and  their   immediate  community.     Unless  those  needs  are  tended  to,  most  individuals   won't  commit  to  causes  that  promise  to  benefit  the   world  at  large.       Catherine  Greener   source: WHO / BBC

 we  ALL  have  to  change  

government education design design enterprise

ageing population population growth resource scarcity knowledge loss non inclusive a move to cities ego-centric natural disasters emerging economies change source: engine group and UNFPA source: engine group and UK statistics

emerging economies 1 billion of these people are living in slums, squats & unofficial settlements  source: UNHABITAT

a way forward image: Jesse Stewart / www.areaofdesign.com

systems perspective life cycle thinking responsible design responsible enterprise circular economy image  source:  Fuse  /  GeKy  

this thinking is not new Source: a paper on materialism by Alwyn Jones, 1987

the  single  biggest  problem  in   communicaLon  is  the  illusion   that  it  has  taken  place.     George  Bernard  Shaw        

designers influence how people consume, use, behave … live. industry design consumers

80% of eco-impacts are determined At design stage image  source:    Chris  Jordan  

what would the design brief for the industrial revolution look like? design a system of production that: 1.  puts billions of pounds of toxic material into the air, water and soil 2. measures prosperity by activity, not legacy 3. requires thousands of complex regulations to keep people and natural systems from being poisoned too quickly 4. produces materials so dangerous that they will require constant vigilance from future generations 5. results in gigantic amounts of waste 6. puts valuable materials in holes all over the planet, where they can never be retrieved 7. erodes the diversity of biological species and cultural practices source: William McDonough and Michael Braungart in Penny Allen (ed) (2001) Metaphors for Change: partnership, tools and civic action for sustainability, Sheffield: Greenleaf: 68 – from a presentation by Emma Dewberry 2008 to the Ecodesign Centre & partners

NO MAGIC MATERIALS

but  there  is   biomimicry       check out Michael Pawlyn & Janine Benyus

responsibility  needs  to  be  at   the  core  of  the  organisaton   and  all  of  its  people,  not  just   its  products  and  services  

responsibility = ability to respond & ethics = how we think, act, behave

good  design  is?  

good design is: innovative useful aesthetic understandable unobtrusive honest long-lasting thorough environmentally friendly as little design as possible Dieter Rams (from the ’70s)

 responsible     business  models   no  ownership   lease  /  service   hire   shared   individual   consumer   goods   cooperaLve   full  ownership   (adapted from Cooper et al.)

basic  sustainable  design  criteria     long-­‐life     non-­‐toxic       localise     renewable  energy  

we need: to talk ‘resource’ instead of ‘waste’ to focus on ‘need’ & ‘use’ instead of ‘consume’ to co-create goods with transformative use cycles non-toxic long-life products suitable for appropriate remanufacture & reuse a widespread culture of transparency, honesty & openness (traceability) true life cycle collaboration through empathy & extending trust

we need: metrics to account for true cost to ensure there is no shift of environmental & social burden between stages of life cycle new models of business & un-ownership adaptable supply circles instead of chains frameworks to build capacity & competencies to stimulate demand through ‘tools’ such as public procurement

we need: metrics to account for true cost to ensure there is no shift of environmental & social burden between stages of life cycle new models of business & un-ownership adaptable supply circles instead of chains frameworks to build capacity & competencies to stimulate demand through ‘tools’ such as public procurement

case study: Welsh SME office furniture @Orangebox_Ltd

@Orangebox_Ltd

Ara: good design Cradle to Cradle “remake the way we make things” thinking about the materials we use, how our products are designed and assembled, and their cycles of use with our customers. No matter how good your products are, there comes a time when their first useful life comes to an end. In considering product life cycles Cradle to Cradle asks us to re-think the commonplace approach of “take, make & waste” and this prompted us to act. During the early stages of the design of Ara we established a relationship with one of Cradle to Cradle’s authors, renowned industrial chemist Micheal Braungart. Throughout the development we have been working with EPEA, Micheal’s C2C organisation based in Hamburg. Returning your ARA at ‘End of Life’ Cradle to Cradle is an approach to design which looks to make us truly environmentally effective, by developing products for closed loop systems in which all the materials used are safe and beneficial - either to biodegrade naturally or to be fully recycled into high quality materials for subsequent product generations, again and again. In order for us to maximise the value of the materials used in your chair we’d like to get them back once you’ve finished with them. It’s pretty simple, all you need to do is visit our website at www.orangebox.com/endoflife.htm We know that people come in all shapes and sizes. That’s why smart engineering inside the mechanism means the ride can be tuned and balanced to your precise needs, using adjustment controls that are easy to operate and labelled clearly. Arm support that’s there only when you need it. Our goal was to design a new arm pad that was more comforta than ever, using materials that could be segregated easily and recyc more effectively. The traditional PU is replaced by a flexible polym with a separate insert made from recycled foam. The result is armrest that’s robust, easy to use and probably the most comforta we’ve ever made. disassembly takeback, reuse cradle to cradle, collaboration Do something really simple; make the chair base 100% recyclable. Not the most complicated part on a task chair, granted, but we as ourselves the question - some look much better than others but plastic chair bases are pretty much the same, aren’t they? Well in sense they are, and with very few exceptions they all have a m collar moulded into the plastic to stop the gas lift creeping throug the base. Great for not dragging your chair across the carpet but not so great when you come to recycle it, as the collar can be ver difficult to remove. Smart design and careful material selection has enabled us to cre a base without a collar insert. A simple point but unlike almost other plastic bases ours is 100% recyclable. And rest assured we tested it like mad. @Orangebox_Ltd We’ve always very carefully considered the materials that we use in our products but our aim in working with EPEA is to ensure that what we’re using is truly safe, for humans and the environment alike, and successful in technical cycles of reuse. This means looking in much more detail at every chemical ingredient in the materials we use; to determine which inhibit this aim and need to be substituted or remove as a result.

do: more for less @Orangebox_Ltd collaboration, localisation, non-toxic, part reduction (25% less weight), material streamlining, lightweighting, disassembly, takeback, repair & reuse

do supply chain a local supply chain has reduced manufacturing costs, allowed for closer working relationships with suppliers and has reduced environmental impacts through energy reduction at the transport stage (a direct saving on average of 20% on the cost of components = £280,000 saving) @Orangebox_Ltd

do: responsible design estimated that £750,000 will be saved annually on the do range alone as a direct result of the responsible design led approach employed as part of core business strategy. @Orangebox_Ltd

do: some challenges •  true impact / costs •  material innovation •  ‘greenwash’ •  collection infrastructure •  new business models •  over-consumption / rebound @Orangebox_Ltd image source: http://www.cpnd.org/

do: some challenges •  true impact / costs •  material innovation •  ‘greenwash’ •  collection infrastructure •  new business models •  over-consumption / rebound @Orangebox_Ltd image source: http://www.cpnd.org/

case study: Welsh-based multinational car audio systems Harman International

 car  components  

 speakers   source: WHO / BBC source: Harman

 neodymium    car  speaker   low  carbon   image sources: Harman & wiki

 polluLon    true  cost    image source: hybridcars.com

 toxicity,  health    true  cost    image source: dailymail.co.uk

 polluLon    true  cost   source: wiki.umd.edu / getty images source: Chris Jordan

low  carbon  /  high  on     criLcal  materials   source: mywindpowersystem.com

what  next?   what  now?  

be the change you want to see in the world Mahatma Gandhi

images:  Apple  products,   miscell.  sites,  EDC  logo   1988 1989 big  change   1991 1995 rip  it  up  &  start  again   1999 big  change   2006 ! 2013 2014 rip  it  up  &  start  again   what  now?  

what is your why?

brand you?

make a real difference? or satisfy, nourish ego?

what  one  does  is  what   counts.  Not  what  one  had   the  intenLon  of  doing     Pablo  Picasso    

integrity  –  intenLon  –   capabiliLes  –  results     •  about  journey  as  much  as  des6na6on   (unfixed)       •  how  we  behave,  act,  think  …   •  empathy  &  trust  

our  responsibility  is  no  longer  to   acquire,  but  to  be         Rabindranath  Tagore      

to  be…  We  cannot  just  be  by   ourselves  alone.  We  have  to   inter-­‐be  with  every  other  thing         Thich  Nhat  Hanh  

you could … decide not to stay where you are find something you love, believe in, are passionate about take responsibility, lead don’t be afraid to fail learn from your mistakes understand your own role ensure you are contributing, relevant

and you could … clearly define your values set a clear vision, mission seek to understand, empathise, trust focus on building capacity ‘walk the talk’ share, give, help (abundance) keep it simple, do it now

and maybe not be a … simply a game player ego-designer (look at me .. / me, me, me ..) untruthful (wash)

do  not  accept     ‘that’s  the  way  it  is’  

do  not  accept     ‘that’s  the  way  it  is’  

“You never change things by fighting the existing reality. To change something, build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete.” R. Buckminster Fuller

“You never change things by fighting the existing reality. To change something, build a new model that makes the existing model obsolete.” R. Buckminster Fuller

don’t  be  afraid  to  ‘rip   it  up  and  start  again’  

a  journey  of  a  thousand  miles   must  begin  with  a  single  step.         Lao  Tzu  

today  is  one  step  ………..                    

choose  one  thing  to  do  now  

thanks: Sonja & Georgia for suggesting I come along Paul for agreeing J all of you for being here J good luck – believe!     @frank_oconnor   frankjackdin@usa.net  

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