Greek Tragedy Notes

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Information about Greek Tragedy Notes

Published on March 24, 2008

Author: theunquietlibrarian

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Notes on Greek tragedy for 10th grade.

Greek Tragedy Notes 10B Literature/Composition October 30, 2006

Chorus In our play, the chorus represents the old men of Thebes The main function of the chorus was to sing and dance lyric odes between dramatic episodes or scenes. They react as their characters should. They are a sounding board for opinion. They speak for the people; they act as a collective group.

In our play, the chorus represents the old men of Thebes

The main function of the chorus was to sing and dance lyric odes between dramatic episodes or scenes.

They react as their characters should.

They are a sounding board for opinion.

They speak for the people; they act as a collective group.

Hybris or Hubris Excessive pride carried to the point of folly or foolishness In Greek, it referred to physical or verbal assault which brought shame to the victim.

Excessive pride carried to the point of folly or foolishness

In Greek, it referred to physical or verbal assault which brought shame to the victim.

Oracles In order to understand the will of the gods, the Greeks consulted oracles. These were holy places specific to a god or goddess. Humans could pose questions; the god would answer through a chosen intermediary.

In order to understand the will of the gods, the Greeks consulted oracles.

These were holy places specific to a god or goddess.

Humans could pose questions; the god would answer through a chosen intermediary.

Pollution Murder and incest (acts that violate natural laws and human laws). These crimes were seen as offensive to the gods. Both the agent and location of the crime were “polluted” by the act, as were people who might harbor the offender. Proper ritual cleansing was needed to restore the individual and the place to ORDER.

Murder and incest (acts that violate natural laws and human laws).

These crimes were seen as offensive to the gods.

Both the agent and location of the crime were “polluted” by the act, as were people who might harbor the offender.

Proper ritual cleansing was needed to restore the individual and the place to ORDER.

Catharsis A ritual purification of pollution. Used by Aristotle for the purging of strong emotions achieved while watching tragedy. We experience a catharsis while watching Greek tragedy because we feel terror, horror, and pity for the tragic hero. A “cleansing” of emotion.

A ritual purification of pollution.

Used by Aristotle for the purging of strong emotions achieved while watching tragedy.

We experience a catharsis while watching Greek tragedy because we feel terror, horror, and pity for the tragic hero.

A “cleansing” of emotion.

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