Functional Programming - Recursion

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Published on February 20, 2014

Author: uyar

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Recursion, tail recursion.

Functional Programming Recursion H. Turgut Uyar 2013-2014

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Topics 1 Functions Infix and Prefix Notations Guards Errors 2 Recursion Primitive Recursion Tail Recursion Tree Recursion Examples

Topics 1 Functions Infix and Prefix Notations Guards Errors 2 Recursion Primitive Recursion Tail Recursion Tree Recursion Examples

Infix Functions function calls can be written in infix notation within backquotes example: the mod function even1 :: Integer -> Bool even1 n = mod n 2 == 0 -- OR: even1 :: Integer -> Bool even1 n = n `mod` 2 == 0

Prefix Operators operator calls can be written in prefix notation within parentheses example: the * operator even2 :: Integer -> Bool even2 n = (n `div` 2 ) * 2 == n -- OR: even2 :: Integer -> Bool even2 n = (*) (div n 2) 2 == n -- OR: even2 :: Integer -> Bool even2 n = (==) ((*) (div n 2) 2) n

Topics 1 Functions Infix and Prefix Notations Guards Errors 2 Recursion Primitive Recursion Tail Recursion Tree Recursion Examples

Guards writing conditional expressions can become complicated guards: Boolean expressions to check cases in function definitions function result is the expression for the first valid guard name :: t1 -> t2 -> ... -> tk -> t name x1 x2 ... xk | g1 = e1 | g2 = e2 ... | otherwise = e

Guard Example maxThree :: Integer -> Integer -> Integer -> Integer maxThree x y z | x >= y && x >= z = x | y >= z = y | otherwise = z

Topics 1 Functions Infix and Prefix Notations Guards Errors 2 Recursion Primitive Recursion Tail Recursion Tree Recursion Examples

Errors an exception can be raised using error example: reciprocal (multiplicative inverse) reciprocal :: Float -> Float reciprocal x | x == 0 = error "zero does not have a reciprocal" | otherwise = 1.0 / x

Topics 1 Functions Infix and Prefix Notations Guards Errors 2 Recursion Primitive Recursion Tail Recursion Tree Recursion Examples

Recursion Examples consider two classic examples: greatest common divisor gcd’ :: Integer -> Integer -> Integer gcd’ x y = if y == 0 then x else gcd’ y (x `mod` y) factorial fact :: Integer -> Integer fact n | n < 0 = error "negative parameter" | n == 0 = 1 | otherwise = n * fact (n - 1)

Recursion Examples consider two classic examples: greatest common divisor gcd’ :: Integer -> Integer -> Integer gcd’ x y = if y == 0 then x else gcd’ y (x `mod` y) factorial fact :: Integer -> Integer fact n | n < 0 = error "negative parameter" | n == 0 = 1 | otherwise = n * fact (n - 1)

Stack Frame Example gcd’ x y = if y == 0 then x else gcd’ y (x `mod` y) gcd' 9702 945 |- gcd' 945 252 |- gcd' 252 189 |- gcd' 189 63 |- gcd' 63 0 63 63 63 63 63

Stack Frame Example gcd’ x y = if y == 0 then x else gcd’ y (x `mod` y) gcd' 9702 945 |- gcd' 945 252 |- gcd' 252 189 |- gcd' 189 63 |- gcd' 63 0 63 63 63 63 63

Stack Frame Example fact n | n < 0 = error "negative parameter" | n == 0 = 1 | otherwise = n * fact (n - 1) fact 4 |- 4 * fact 3 |- 3 * fact 2 |- 2 * fact 1 |- 1 * fact 0 1 1 2 6 24

Topics 1 Functions Infix and Prefix Notations Guards Errors 2 Recursion Primitive Recursion Tail Recursion Tree Recursion Examples

Tail Recursion if the result of the recursive call is also the result of the caller, then the function is said to be tail recursive the recursive function call is the last action: nothing left for the caller to do no need to keep the stack frame around → reuse the frame of the caller

Tail Recursion if the result of the recursive call is also the result of the caller, then the function is said to be tail recursive the recursive function call is the last action: nothing left for the caller to do no need to keep the stack frame around → reuse the frame of the caller

Stack Frame Example gcd’ x y = if y == 0 then x else gcd’ y (x `mod` y) gcd' 9702 945 gcd' 945 252 gcd' 252 189 gcd' 189 63 gcd' 63 0 63

Tail Recursion to rearrange a function to be tail recursive: define a helper function that takes an accumulator base case: return accumulator recursive case: make recursive call with new accumulator value

Tail Recursion Example factIter :: Integer -> Integer -> Integer factIter acc n | n < 0 = error "negative parameter" | n == 0 = acc | otherwise = factIter (acc * n) (n - 1) fact’ :: Integer -> Integer fact’ n = factIter 1 n

Stack Frame Example factIter acc n | n < 0 = error "negative parameter" | n == 0 = acc | otherwise = factIter (acc * n) (n - 1) fact 4 |- factIter 1 4 |- factIter 4 3 |- factIter 12 2 |- factIter 24 1 |- factIter 24 0 24 24

Tail Recursion Example the helper function doesn’t need to be visible fact’ :: Integer -> Integer fact’ n = factIter 1 n where factIter :: Integer -> Integer -> Integer factIter acc n’ | n’ < 0 = error "negative parameter" | n’ == 0 = acc | otherwise = factIter (acc * n’) (n’ - 1)

Topics 1 Functions Infix and Prefix Notations Guards Errors 2 Recursion Primitive Recursion Tail Recursion Tree Recursion Examples

Tree Recursion another classic example: the Fibonacci sequence fibn =    1 if n = 1 1 if n = 2 fibn−2 + fibn−1 if n > 2 fib :: Integer -> Integer fib n | n == 1 = 1 | n == 2 = 1 | otherwise = fib (n - 2) + fib (n - 1)

Stack Frame Example fib 5 | ------------------ | | fib 3 fib 4 | | ------------- ------------- | | | | fib 1 fib 2 fib 2 fib 3 | ------------- | | fib 1 fib 2

Topics 1 Functions Infix and Prefix Notations Guards Errors 2 Recursion Primitive Recursion Tail Recursion Tree Recursion Examples

Recursion Example exponentiation compute xy where y ∈ N pow :: Integer -> Integer -> Integer pow x y | y == 0 = 1 | otherwise = x * pow x (y - 1) let’s use the following: xy =    1 if y = 0 (xy/2) 2 if y is even x · xy−1 if y is odd

Recursion Example exponentiation compute xy where y ∈ N pow :: Integer -> Integer -> Integer pow x y | y == 0 = 1 | otherwise = x * pow x (y - 1) let’s use the following: xy =    1 if y = 0 (xy/2) 2 if y is even x · xy−1 if y is odd

Recursion Example fast exponentiation fastPow :: Integer -> Integer -> Integer fastPow x y | y == 0 = 1 | even y = sqr (fastPow x (y `div` 2)) | otherwise = x * fastPow x (y - 1) where sqr :: Integer -> Integer sqr n = n * n

Recursion Example square roots with Newton’s method start with an initial guess y (say y = 1) repeatedly improve the guess by taking the mean of y and x/y until the guess is good enough ( √ x · √ x = x) y x/y next guess 1 2 / 1 = 2 1.5 1.5 2 / 1.5 = 1.333 1.4167 1.4167 2 / 1.4167 = 1.4118 1.4142 1.4142 ... ...

Recursion Example goal: guess = √ x if guess is good enough: |guess · guess − x| < check whether the guess is good enough isGoodEnough :: Float -> Float -> Bool isGoodEnough guess x = abs (guess * guess - x) < 0.001 improve the guess improve :: Float -> Float -> Float improve guess x = (guess + (x / guess)) / 2.0

Recursion Example goal: guess = √ x if guess is good enough: |guess · guess − x| < check whether the guess is good enough isGoodEnough :: Float -> Float -> Bool isGoodEnough guess x = abs (guess * guess - x) < 0.001 improve the guess improve :: Float -> Float -> Float improve guess x = (guess + (x / guess)) / 2.0

Recursion Example goal: guess = √ x if guess is good enough: |guess · guess − x| < check whether the guess is good enough isGoodEnough :: Float -> Float -> Bool isGoodEnough guess x = abs (guess * guess - x) < 0.001 improve the guess improve :: Float -> Float -> Float improve guess x = (guess + (x / guess)) / 2.0

Recursion Example iterative computation newtonIter :: Float -> Float -> Float newtonIter guess x = if isGoodEnough guess x then guess else newtonIter (improve guess x) x newton :: Float -> Float newton x = newtonIter 1.0 x

Recursion Example newton :: Float -> Float newton x = newtonIter 1.0 x where isGoodEnough :: Float -> Float -> Bool isGoodEnough guess x’ = abs (guess * guess - x’) < 0.001 improve :: Float -> Float -> Float improve guess x’ = (guess + (x’ / guess)) / 2.0 newtonIter :: Float -> Float -> Float newtonIter guess x’ = if isGoodEnough guess x’ then guess else newtonIter (improve guess x’) x’

Recursion Example doesn’t work with too small and too large numbers (why?) isGoodEnough guess x’ = (abs (guess * guess - x’)) / x’ < 0.001

Recursion Example doesn’t work with too small and too large numbers (why?) isGoodEnough guess x’ = (abs (guess * guess - x’)) / x’ < 0.001

Recursion Example no need to pass x around, it’s already in scope newton x = newtonIter 1.0 where isGoodEnough :: Float -> Bool isGoodEnough guess = (abs (guess * guess - x)) / x < 0.001 improve :: Float -> Float improve guess = (guess + (x / guess)) / 2.0 newtonIter :: Float -> Float newtonIter guess = if isGoodEnough guess then guess else newtonIter (improve guess)

Recursion Example no need to pass x around, it’s already in scope newton x = newtonIter 1.0 where isGoodEnough :: Float -> Bool isGoodEnough guess = (abs (guess * guess - x)) / x < 0.001 improve :: Float -> Float improve guess = (guess + (x / guess)) / 2.0 newtonIter :: Float -> Float newtonIter guess = if isGoodEnough guess then guess else newtonIter (improve guess)

References Required Reading: Thompson Chapter 3: Basic types and definitions Chapter 4: Designing and writing programs

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