Frederick Douglass - Virtual Exhibit

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Information about Frederick Douglass - Virtual Exhibit
Education

Published on August 19, 2009

Author: hcclibref

Source: authorstream.com

Slide 1: Frederick Douglass The Father of the Civil Rights Movement Slide 2: Eastern Shore Talbot County, Maryland Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey was born to Harriet Bailey (a slave) and a white father. Until he was 6, he lived with his Grandmother (a slave) and Grandfather Bailey (a freeman). At the age of six he was taken to be a slave at Lloyd Plantation in Wye River, Maryland. While at the plantation he was spared the cruel physical abuse endured by other slaves, but endured the hardships of slave life. Ball and Chain, Curtain Tiebacks, 1885-1890. “Douglass never forgot that he was once a slave. He became a leading spokesman for the abolition of slavery and for racial equality.” FRDO 650. Frederick Douglass National Historic Site. National Park Service, Museum Management Program, Carol M. Highsmith, photographer. Slide 3: Baltimore, Maryland In 1826 Frederick Douglass was sent to Fells Point to be the slave of the Auld family. During his time in Baltimore, Mrs. Auld started to teach Frederick Douglass how to read but stopped after her husband objected. However, Frederick Douglass found ways to continue to learn to read and write. For a brief time he was sent to the Eastern Shore but eventually returned to the Auld family in Baltimore. On September 3, 1838 Frederick Douglas escaped and fled to the north settling in New Bedford, Massachusetts. Columbian Orator, 1817 by Caleb Bingham. “As a young boy, Douglass purchased this book, in Baltimore, for .50 cents. This book increased his awareness of the need for personal liberty and that slavery was wrong. Douglass studied the text to hone his oratory skills.” FRDO 650. Frederick Douglass National Historic Site. National Park Service, Museum Management Program, Carol M. Highsmith, photographer Slide 4: Abolitionist, Lecturer, Freedom Fighter While living in Massachusetts, he changed his last name from Bailey to Douglass. During this time he joined the Abolitionist Movement and became known for his talent as a speaker. After publishing his biography, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave, he went to England. While in England, his supporters raised the money needed for his freedom and on December 12, 1846 Frederick Douglass became a freeman. In 1847, he started his own newspaper, The North Star, which later became known as the Douglass’ Monthly. Frederick Douglass also attended the Women’s Rights Convention in 1848 and became a lifelong supporter of women’s rights. The North Star, 1847-1850. “Frederick Douglass founded the North Star, an abolitionist newspaper. Douglass gained a circulation of over 4,000 in the U.S., Europe, and the Caribbean.” FRDO3219. Frederick Douglass National Historic Site. National Park Service, Museum Management Program, Carol M. Highsmith, photographer. Slide 5: The Civil War and Politics Frederick Douglass was very active in politics. He became involved in the Liberty Party but later joined the newly formed Republican Party. In 1852 he was chosen to be the Vice-President of the Liberty Party’s convention and in 1855 was nominated to be the Secretary of State of New York. When the Civil War started he called for the formation of black troops into the Union Army and was appointed as an U.S. agent for the recruitment of black troops. During the Civil War he met President Lincoln. He first met Lincoln in 1863 to discuss the discrimination against black troops in the army. Frederick Douglass was invited to the White House in 1864 to discuss President Lincoln’s re-election campaign and in 1865 as a guest at President’s Lincoln’s inaugural ball. Charge of the 54th Massachusetts Colored Regiment July 18th, 1863. FRDO120. Frederick Douglass National Historic Site. National Park Service, Museum Management Program, Carol M. Highsmith, photographer. Slide 6: Later Years After the Civil war, he continued his career as a speaker and held many other jobs in the private and political sector. In 1872 , he was nominated to be the Vice President of the United States of America by the Equal Rights party but turned down the nomination and campaigned for President Grant. He also served as the United States Marshal for the District of Columbia in 1877 and in 1881 became the Recorder of Deeds for the District of Columbia. President Benjamin Harrison, appointed him as the Minister Resident and Consul General to Haiti and the Charge’d’Affaires for Santo Domingo in 1891. Frederick Douglass died on February 20, 1895 at his home, Cedar Hill, in Washington D.C. and is buried in Mount Hope Cemetery in Rochester New York. Frederick Douglass and his desk in Haiti. FRDO3899. Frederick Douglass National Historic Site. National Park Service, Museum Management Program, Carol M. Highsmith, photographer. Slide 7: You’re Invited Frederick Douglass: A Living History Presentation Featuring: Bill Grimmette When: Thursday, September 17, 2009 Where: Edgewood Hall, Room 132 Time: 6:00 P.M. Slide 8: To find out more information: Ask our Librarians http://www.harford.edu/library Frederick Douglass National Historic Site http://www.nps.gov/frdo Frederick Douglass Museum http://www.nahc.org/fd/index.html The Frederick Douglass Papers at the Library of Congress http://memory.loc.gov/ammem/doughtml/doughome.html Harpers Ferry National Historic Park http://www.nps.gov/hafe Women’s Rights National Historic Park http://www.nps.gov/wori Slide 9: Books by Frederick Douglass: Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave My Bondage and My Freedom Life and Times of Frederick Douglass To Find These Books Search Our Catalog: http://www.harford.edu/library Slide 10: Information for this presentation came from: Frederick Douglass National Historic Site http://www.nps.gov/frdo http://www.nps.gov/frdo/historyculture/chronology/html Photographs came from: Frederick Douglass National Historic Site http://www. nps.gov/frdo/photosmultimedia/index.htm and Frederick Douglass Virtual Exhibit http://www.nps.gov/frdo/history/museum/exhibits

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