Foxfire High School Presentation

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Published on January 22, 2008

Author: wpaisley

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Foxfire High School: Foxfire High School Meeting Kids’ Needs HELPING STUDENTS GRADUATE Strategies and Tools To Help At-Risk Learners Graduate Franklin Schargel: Foxfire High School Meeting Kids’ Needs HELPING STUDENTS GRADUATEStrategies and Tools To Help At-Risk Learners Graduate Franklin Schargel Every School Day: Foxfire High School Meeting Kids’ Needs HELPING STUDENTS GRADUATEStrategies and Tools To Help At-Risk Learners Graduate Franklin Schargel Every School Day Every school day 181 school buses loaded with children leave school never to return. That is the number of students who drop out EVERY SCHOOL DAY What Is “At-Risk”?: Foxfire High School Meeting Kids’ Needs HELPING STUDENTS GRADUATEStrategies and Tools To Help At-Risk Learners Graduate Franklin Schargel Every School Day Every school day 181 school buses loaded with children leave school never to return. That is the number of students who drop out EVERY SCHOOL DAY What Is “At-Risk”? An at-risk student is “someone who is unlikely to graduate on schedule with both the skills and the self-esteem necessary to exercise meaningful options in the areas of work, leisure, culture, civic affairs, and inter/intrapersonal relationships”. Richard Sagor At-Risk of What?: Foxfire High School Meeting Kids’ Needs HELPING STUDENTS GRADUATEStrategies and Tools To Help At-Risk Learners Graduate Franklin Schargel Every School Day Every school day 181 school buses loaded with children leave school never to return. That is the number of students who drop out EVERY SCHOOL DAY What Is “At-Risk”? An at-risk student is “someone who is unlikely to graduate on schedule with both the skills and the self-esteem necessary to exercise meaningful options in the areas of work, leisure, culture, civic affairs, and inter/intrapersonal relationships”. Richard Sagor At-Risk of What? Failing subjects Going into poverty Being held back Becoming pregnant Losing self-esteem Joining a gang Being frustrated At-Risk of What?: Foxfire High School Meeting Kids’ Needs HELPING STUDENTS GRADUATEStrategies and Tools To Help At-Risk Learners Graduate Franklin Schargel Every School Day Every school day 181 school buses loaded with children leave school never to return. That is the number of students who drop out EVERY SCHOOL DAY What Is “At-Risk”? An at-risk student is “someone who is unlikely to graduate on schedule with both the skills and the self-esteem necessary to exercise meaningful options in the areas of work, leisure, culture, civic affairs, and inter/intrapersonal relationships”. Richard Sagor At-Risk of What? Failing subjects Going into poverty Being held back Becoming pregnant Losing self-esteem Joining a gang Being frustrated At-Risk of What? Marrying someone at-risk Dropping out Raising at-risk children Not getting a job Not able to thrive in the 21st century Getting a low-paying job Using alcohol/drugs Who is Most “At-Risk”?: Foxfire High School Meeting Kids’ Needs HELPING STUDENTS GRADUATEStrategies and Tools To Help At-Risk Learners Graduate Franklin Schargel Every School Day Every school day 181 school buses loaded with children leave school never to return. That is the number of students who drop out EVERY SCHOOL DAY What Is “At-Risk”? An at-risk student is “someone who is unlikely to graduate on schedule with both the skills and the self-esteem necessary to exercise meaningful options in the areas of work, leisure, culture, civic affairs, and inter/intrapersonal relationships”. Richard Sagor At-Risk of What? Failing subjects Going into poverty Being held back Becoming pregnant Losing self-esteem Joining a gang Being frustrated At-Risk of What? Marrying someone at-risk Dropping out Raising at-risk children Not getting a job Not able to thrive in the 21st century Getting a low-paying job Using alcohol/drugs Who is Most “At-Risk”? T hose with irregular attendance. Those who are two years or more below grade level. Those who show a disinterest in school. Those who come from families with either a low or high income. Those who are overage for their grade. Those who are discipline problems. Those with a language deficit. Those who are teen parents. What Places Students At-Risk Student-Related Factors: Foxfire High School Meeting Kids’ Needs HELPING STUDENTS GRADUATEStrategies and Tools To Help At-Risk Learners Graduate Franklin Schargel Every School Day Every school day 181 school buses loaded with children leave school never to return. That is the number of students who drop out EVERY SCHOOL DAY What Is “At-Risk”? An at-risk student is “someone who is unlikely to graduate on schedule with both the skills and the self-esteem necessary to exercise meaningful options in the areas of work, leisure, culture, civic affairs, and inter/intrapersonal relationships”. Richard Sagor At-Risk of What? Failing subjects Going into poverty Being held back Becoming pregnant Losing self-esteem Joining a gang Being frustrated At-Risk of What? Marrying someone at-risk Dropping out Raising at-risk children Not getting a job Not able to thrive in the 21st century Getting a low-paying job Using alcohol/drugs Who is Most “At-Risk”? T hose with irregular attendance. Those who are two years or more below grade level. Those who show a disinterest in school. Those who come from families with either a low or high income. Those who are overage for their grade. Those who are discipline problems. Those with a language deficit. Those who are teen parents. What Places Students At-RiskStudent-Related Factors Poor school attitude Low ability level Attendance/truancy Behavior /discipline problems Pregnancy Drug abuse Poor peer relationships Nonparticipation Friends have dropped out Illness/disability Low self-esteem What Places Students At-Risk? Family-Related Factors: Foxfire High School Meeting Kids’ Needs HELPING STUDENTS GRADUATEStrategies and Tools To Help At-Risk Learners Graduate Franklin Schargel Every School Day Every school day 181 school buses loaded with children leave school never to return. That is the number of students who drop out EVERY SCHOOL DAY What Is “At-Risk”? An at-risk student is “someone who is unlikely to graduate on schedule with both the skills and the self-esteem necessary to exercise meaningful options in the areas of work, leisure, culture, civic affairs, and inter/intrapersonal relationships”. Richard Sagor At-Risk of What? Failing subjects Going into poverty Being held back Becoming pregnant Losing self-esteem Joining a gang Being frustrated At-Risk of What? Marrying someone at-risk Dropping out Raising at-risk children Not getting a job Not able to thrive in the 21st century Getting a low-paying job Using alcohol/drugs Who is Most “At-Risk”? T hose with irregular attendance. Those who are two years or more below grade level. Those who show a disinterest in school. Those who come from families with either a low or high income. Those who are overage for their grade. Those who are discipline problems. Those with a language deficit. Those who are teen parents. What Places Students At-RiskStudent-Related Factors Poor school attitude Low ability level Attendance/truancy Behavior /discipline problems Pregnancy Drug abuse Poor peer relationships Nonparticipation Friends have dropped out Illness/disability Low self-esteem What Places Students At-Risk?Family-Related Factors Low SES Non-English-speaking home Ineffective parenting/abuse Low parental expectations Dysfunctional home life No parent involvement High mobility Low educational level What Places Students At-Risk? School-Related Factors: Foxfire High School Meeting Kids’ Needs HELPING STUDENTS GRADUATEStrategies and Tools To Help At-Risk Learners Graduate Franklin Schargel Every School Day Every school day 181 school buses loaded with children leave school never to return. That is the number of students who drop out EVERY SCHOOL DAY What Is “At-Risk”? An at-risk student is “someone who is unlikely to graduate on schedule with both the skills and the self-esteem necessary to exercise meaningful options in the areas of work, leisure, culture, civic affairs, and inter/intrapersonal relationships”. Richard Sagor At-Risk of What? Failing subjects Going into poverty Being held back Becoming pregnant Losing self-esteem Joining a gang Being frustrated At-Risk of What? Marrying someone at-risk Dropping out Raising at-risk children Not getting a job Not able to thrive in the 21st century Getting a low-paying job Using alcohol/drugs Who is Most “At-Risk”? T hose with irregular attendance. Those who are two years or more below grade level. Those who show a disinterest in school. Those who come from families with either a low or high income. Those who are overage for their grade. Those who are discipline problems. Those with a language deficit. Those who are teen parents. What Places Students At-RiskStudent-Related Factors Poor school attitude Low ability level Attendance/truancy Behavior /discipline problems Pregnancy Drug abuse Poor peer relationships Nonparticipation Friends have dropped out Illness/disability Low self-esteem What Places Students At-Risk?Family-Related Factors Low SES Non-English-speaking home Ineffective parenting/abuse Low parental expectations Dysfunctional home life No parent involvement High mobility Low educational level What Places Students At-Risk?School-Related Factors Conflict between home/school culture Ineffective discipline system Lack of adequate counseling Negative school climate Retentions/Suspensions What Places Students At-Risk? School-Related Factors: Foxfire High School Meeting Kids’ Needs HELPING STUDENTS GRADUATEStrategies and Tools To Help At-Risk Learners Graduate Franklin Schargel Every School Day Every school day 181 school buses loaded with children leave school never to return. That is the number of students who drop out EVERY SCHOOL DAY What Is “At-Risk”? An at-risk student is “someone who is unlikely to graduate on schedule with both the skills and the self-esteem necessary to exercise meaningful options in the areas of work, leisure, culture, civic affairs, and inter/intrapersonal relationships”. Richard Sagor At-Risk of What? Failing subjects Going into poverty Being held back Becoming pregnant Losing self-esteem Joining a gang Being frustrated At-Risk of What? Marrying someone at-risk Dropping out Raising at-risk children Not getting a job Not able to thrive in the 21st century Getting a low-paying job Using alcohol/drugs Who is Most “At-Risk”? T hose with irregular attendance. Those who are two years or more below grade level. Those who show a disinterest in school. Those who come from families with either a low or high income. Those who are overage for their grade. Those who are discipline problems. Those with a language deficit. Those who are teen parents. What Places Students At-RiskStudent-Related Factors Poor school attitude Low ability level Attendance/truancy Behavior /discipline problems Pregnancy Drug abuse Poor peer relationships Nonparticipation Friends have dropped out Illness/disability Low self-esteem What Places Students At-Risk?Family-Related Factors Low SES Non-English-speaking home Ineffective parenting/abuse Low parental expectations Dysfunctional home life No parent involvement High mobility Low educational level What Places Students At-Risk?School-Related Factors Conflict between home/school culture Ineffective discipline system Lack of adequate counseling Negative school climate Retentions/Suspensions What Places Students At-Risk?School-Related Factors Disregard of student learning styles Inappropriate use of technology Passive instructional strategies Lack of language instruction Lack of relevant curriculum Low expectations What Places Students At-Risk? Community-Related Factors: Foxfire High School Meeting Kids’ Needs HELPING STUDENTS GRADUATEStrategies and Tools To Help At-Risk Learners Graduate Franklin Schargel Every School Day Every school day 181 school buses loaded with children leave school never to return. That is the number of students who drop out EVERY SCHOOL DAY What Is “At-Risk”? An at-risk student is “someone who is unlikely to graduate on schedule with both the skills and the self-esteem necessary to exercise meaningful options in the areas of work, leisure, culture, civic affairs, and inter/intrapersonal relationships”. Richard Sagor At-Risk of What? Failing subjects Going into poverty Being held back Becoming pregnant Losing self-esteem Joining a gang Being frustrated At-Risk of What? Marrying someone at-risk Dropping out Raising at-risk children Not getting a job Not able to thrive in the 21st century Getting a low-paying job Using alcohol/drugs Who is Most “At-Risk”? T hose with irregular attendance. Those who are two years or more below grade level. Those who show a disinterest in school. Those who come from families with either a low or high income. Those who are overage for their grade. Those who are discipline problems. Those with a language deficit. Those who are teen parents. What Places Students At-RiskStudent-Related Factors Poor school attitude Low ability level Attendance/truancy Behavior /discipline problems Pregnancy Drug abuse Poor peer relationships Nonparticipation Friends have dropped out Illness/disability Low self-esteem What Places Students At-Risk?Family-Related Factors Low SES Non-English-speaking home Ineffective parenting/abuse Low parental expectations Dysfunctional home life No parent involvement High mobility Low educational level What Places Students At-Risk?School-Related Factors Conflict between home/school culture Ineffective discipline system Lack of adequate counseling Negative school climate Retentions/Suspensions What Places Students At-Risk?School-Related Factors Disregard of student learning styles Inappropriate use of technology Passive instructional strategies Lack of language instruction Lack of relevant curriculum Low expectations What Places Students At-Risk?Community-Related Factors Lack of community support services Lack of community support for schools Lack of recreational activities High incidences of criminal activities Lack of school/community linkages High poverty Alternative Schooling Types:: Foxfire High School Meeting Kids’ Needs HELPING STUDENTS GRADUATEStrategies and Tools To Help At-Risk Learners Graduate Franklin Schargel Every School Day Every school day 181 school buses loaded with children leave school never to return. That is the number of students who drop out EVERY SCHOOL DAY What Is “At-Risk”? An at-risk student is “someone who is unlikely to graduate on schedule with both the skills and the self-esteem necessary to exercise meaningful options in the areas of work, leisure, culture, civic affairs, and inter/intrapersonal relationships”. Richard Sagor At-Risk of What? Failing subjects Going into poverty Being held back Becoming pregnant Losing self-esteem Joining a gang Being frustrated At-Risk of What? Marrying someone at-risk Dropping out Raising at-risk children Not getting a job Not able to thrive in the 21st century Getting a low-paying job Using alcohol/drugs Who is Most “At-Risk”? T hose with irregular attendance. Those who are two years or more below grade level. Those who show a disinterest in school. Those who come from families with either a low or high income. Those who are overage for their grade. Those who are discipline problems. Those with a language deficit. Those who are teen parents. What Places Students At-RiskStudent-Related Factors Poor school attitude Low ability level Attendance/truancy Behavior /discipline problems Pregnancy Drug abuse Poor peer relationships Nonparticipation Friends have dropped out Illness/disability Low self-esteem What Places Students At-Risk?Family-Related Factors Low SES Non-English-speaking home Ineffective parenting/abuse Low parental expectations Dysfunctional home life No parent involvement High mobility Low educational level What Places Students At-Risk?School-Related Factors Conflict between home/school culture Ineffective discipline system Lack of adequate counseling Negative school climate Retentions/Suspensions What Places Students At-Risk?School-Related Factors Disregard of student learning styles Inappropriate use of technology Passive instructional strategies Lack of language instruction Lack of relevant curriculum Low expectations What Places Students At-Risk?Community-Related Factors Lack of community support services Lack of community support for schools Lack of recreational activities High incidences of criminal activities Lack of school/community linkages High poverty Alternative SchoolingTypes: School-Within-A-School Residential Separate Alternative College-Based Magnet Charter Effective Strategies : Foxfire High School Meeting Kids’ Needs HELPING STUDENTS GRADUATEStrategies and Tools To Help At-Risk Learners Graduate Franklin Schargel Every School Day Every school day 181 school buses loaded with children leave school never to return. That is the number of students who drop out EVERY SCHOOL DAY What Is “At-Risk”? An at-risk student is “someone who is unlikely to graduate on schedule with both the skills and the self-esteem necessary to exercise meaningful options in the areas of work, leisure, culture, civic affairs, and inter/intrapersonal relationships”. Richard Sagor At-Risk of What? Failing subjects Going into poverty Being held back Becoming pregnant Losing self-esteem Joining a gang Being frustrated At-Risk of What? Marrying someone at-risk Dropping out Raising at-risk children Not getting a job Not able to thrive in the 21st century Getting a low-paying job Using alcohol/drugs Who is Most “At-Risk”? T hose with irregular attendance. Those who are two years or more below grade level. Those who show a disinterest in school. Those who come from families with either a low or high income. Those who are overage for their grade. Those who are discipline problems. Those with a language deficit. Those who are teen parents. What Places Students At-RiskStudent-Related Factors Poor school attitude Low ability level Attendance/truancy Behavior /discipline problems Pregnancy Drug abuse Poor peer relationships Nonparticipation Friends have dropped out Illness/disability Low self-esteem What Places Students At-Risk?Family-Related Factors Low SES Non-English-speaking home Ineffective parenting/abuse Low parental expectations Dysfunctional home life No parent involvement High mobility Low educational level What Places Students At-Risk?School-Related Factors Conflict between home/school culture Ineffective discipline system Lack of adequate counseling Negative school climate Retentions/Suspensions What Places Students At-Risk?School-Related Factors Disregard of student learning styles Inappropriate use of technology Passive instructional strategies Lack of language instruction Lack of relevant curriculum Low expectations What Places Students At-Risk?Community-Related Factors Lack of community support services Lack of community support for schools Lack of recreational activities High incidences of criminal activities Lack of school/community linkages High poverty Alternative SchoolingTypes: School-Within-A-School Residential Separate Alternative College-Based Magnet Charter Effective Strategies Early Interventions Basic Core Strategies Instructional Practices Making the Most of Community Resources Early Interventions: Foxfire High School Meeting Kids’ Needs HELPING STUDENTS GRADUATEStrategies and Tools To Help At-Risk Learners Graduate Franklin Schargel Every School Day Every school day 181 school buses loaded with children leave school never to return. That is the number of students who drop out EVERY SCHOOL DAY What Is “At-Risk”? An at-risk student is “someone who is unlikely to graduate on schedule with both the skills and the self-esteem necessary to exercise meaningful options in the areas of work, leisure, culture, civic affairs, and inter/intrapersonal relationships”. Richard Sagor At-Risk of What? Failing subjects Going into poverty Being held back Becoming pregnant Losing self-esteem Joining a gang Being frustrated At-Risk of What? Marrying someone at-risk Dropping out Raising at-risk children Not getting a job Not able to thrive in the 21st century Getting a low-paying job Using alcohol/drugs Who is Most “At-Risk”? T hose with irregular attendance. Those who are two years or more below grade level. Those who show a disinterest in school. Those who come from families with either a low or high income. Those who are overage for their grade. Those who are discipline problems. Those with a language deficit. Those who are teen parents. What Places Students At-RiskStudent-Related Factors Poor school attitude Low ability level Attendance/truancy Behavior /discipline problems Pregnancy Drug abuse Poor peer relationships Nonparticipation Friends have dropped out Illness/disability Low self-esteem What Places Students At-Risk?Family-Related Factors Low SES Non-English-speaking home Ineffective parenting/abuse Low parental expectations Dysfunctional home life No parent involvement High mobility Low educational level What Places Students At-Risk?School-Related Factors Conflict between home/school culture Ineffective discipline system Lack of adequate counseling Negative school climate Retentions/Suspensions What Places Students At-Risk?School-Related Factors Disregard of student learning styles Inappropriate use of technology Passive instructional strategies Lack of language instruction Lack of relevant curriculum Low expectations What Places Students At-Risk?Community-Related Factors Lack of community support services Lack of community support for schools Lack of recreational activities High incidences of criminal activities Lack of school/community linkages High poverty Alternative SchoolingTypes: School-Within-A-School Residential Separate Alternative College-Based Magnet Charter Effective Strategies Early Interventions Basic Core Strategies Instructional Practices Making the Most of Community Resources Early Interventions “Family Involvement” Effective Programs Use a Wide-Angle Approach With Children At-Risk Family members Employers Community agencies Educational System Obstacles to Family Involvement: Foxfire High School Meeting Kids’ Needs HELPING STUDENTS GRADUATEStrategies and Tools To Help At-Risk Learners Graduate Franklin Schargel Every School Day Every school day 181 school buses loaded with children leave school never to return. That is the number of students who drop out EVERY SCHOOL DAY What Is “At-Risk”? An at-risk student is “someone who is unlikely to graduate on schedule with both the skills and the self-esteem necessary to exercise meaningful options in the areas of work, leisure, culture, civic affairs, and inter/intrapersonal relationships”. Richard Sagor At-Risk of What? Failing subjects Going into poverty Being held back Becoming pregnant Losing self-esteem Joining a gang Being frustrated At-Risk of What? Marrying someone at-risk Dropping out Raising at-risk children Not getting a job Not able to thrive in the 21st century Getting a low-paying job Using alcohol/drugs Who is Most “At-Risk”? T hose with irregular attendance. Those who are two years or more below grade level. Those who show a disinterest in school. Those who come from families with either a low or high income. Those who are overage for their grade. Those who are discipline problems. Those with a language deficit. Those who are teen parents. What Places Students At-RiskStudent-Related Factors Poor school attitude Low ability level Attendance/truancy Behavior /discipline problems Pregnancy Drug abuse Poor peer relationships Nonparticipation Friends have dropped out Illness/disability Low self-esteem What Places Students At-Risk?Family-Related Factors Low SES Non-English-speaking home Ineffective parenting/abuse Low parental expectations Dysfunctional home life No parent involvement High mobility Low educational level What Places Students At-Risk?School-Related Factors Conflict between home/school culture Ineffective discipline system Lack of adequate counseling Negative school climate Retentions/Suspensions What Places Students At-Risk?School-Related Factors Disregard of student learning styles Inappropriate use of technology Passive instructional strategies Lack of language instruction Lack of relevant curriculum Low expectations What Places Students At-Risk?Community-Related Factors Lack of community support services Lack of community support for schools Lack of recreational activities High incidences of criminal activities Lack of school/community linkages High poverty Alternative SchoolingTypes: School-Within-A-School Residential Separate Alternative College-Based Magnet Charter Effective Strategies Early Interventions Basic Core Strategies Instructional Practices Making the Most of Community Resources Early Interventions “Family Involvement” Effective Programs Use a Wide-Angle Approach With Children At-Risk Family members Employers Community agencies Educational System Obstacles to Family Involvement Language barrier Negative School History Transportation Difficulties Lack of Time Lack of teacher training in how to get parents involved Lack of Stamina Other priorities Schools are closed when parents can come Take care of other children Disruption of normal routine Parents work schedule Reading and Writing Programs : Foxfire High School Meeting Kids’ Needs HELPING STUDENTS GRADUATEStrategies and Tools To Help At-Risk Learners Graduate Franklin Schargel Every School Day Every school day 181 school buses loaded with children leave school never to return. That is the number of students who drop out EVERY SCHOOL DAY What Is “At-Risk”? An at-risk student is “someone who is unlikely to graduate on schedule with both the skills and the self-esteem necessary to exercise meaningful options in the areas of work, leisure, culture, civic affairs, and inter/intrapersonal relationships”. Richard Sagor At-Risk of What? Failing subjects Going into poverty Being held back Becoming pregnant Losing self-esteem Joining a gang Being frustrated At-Risk of What? Marrying someone at-risk Dropping out Raising at-risk children Not getting a job Not able to thrive in the 21st century Getting a low-paying job Using alcohol/drugs Who is Most “At-Risk”? T hose with irregular attendance. Those who are two years or more below grade level. Those who show a disinterest in school. Those who come from families with either a low or high income. Those who are overage for their grade. Those who are discipline problems. Those with a language deficit. Those who are teen parents. What Places Students At-RiskStudent-Related Factors Poor school attitude Low ability level Attendance/truancy Behavior /discipline problems Pregnancy Drug abuse Poor peer relationships Nonparticipation Friends have dropped out Illness/disability Low self-esteem What Places Students At-Risk?Family-Related Factors Low SES Non-English-speaking home Ineffective parenting/abuse Low parental expectations Dysfunctional home life No parent involvement High mobility Low educational level What Places Students At-Risk?School-Related Factors Conflict between home/school culture Ineffective discipline system Lack of adequate counseling Negative school climate Retentions/Suspensions What Places Students At-Risk?School-Related Factors Disregard of student learning styles Inappropriate use of technology Passive instructional strategies Lack of language instruction Lack of relevant curriculum Low expectations What Places Students At-Risk?Community-Related Factors Lack of community support services Lack of community support for schools Lack of recreational activities High incidences of criminal activities Lack of school/community linkages High poverty Alternative SchoolingTypes: School-Within-A-School Residential Separate Alternative College-Based Magnet Charter Effective Strategies Early Interventions Basic Core Strategies Instructional Practices Making the Most of Community Resources Early Interventions “Family Involvement” Effective Programs Use a Wide-Angle Approach With Children At-Risk Family members Employers Community agencies Educational System Obstacles to Family Involvement Language barrier Negative School History Transportation Difficulties Lack of Time Lack of teacher training in how to get parents involved Lack of Stamina Other priorities Schools are closed when parents can come Take care of other children Disruption of normal routine Parents work schedule Reading and Writing Programs Most Successful Programs Have a real-world application Develop communication skills Foster a love of reading Include computer skills Include math skills Mentoring and Tutoring : Foxfire High School Meeting Kids’ Needs HELPING STUDENTS GRADUATEStrategies and Tools To Help At-Risk Learners Graduate Franklin Schargel Every School Day Every school day 181 school buses loaded with children leave school never to return. That is the number of students who drop out EVERY SCHOOL DAY What Is “At-Risk”? An at-risk student is “someone who is unlikely to graduate on schedule with both the skills and the self-esteem necessary to exercise meaningful options in the areas of work, leisure, culture, civic affairs, and inter/intrapersonal relationships”. Richard Sagor At-Risk of What? Failing subjects Going into poverty Being held back Becoming pregnant Losing self-esteem Joining a gang Being frustrated At-Risk of What? Marrying someone at-risk Dropping out Raising at-risk children Not getting a job Not able to thrive in the 21st century Getting a low-paying job Using alcohol/drugs Who is Most “At-Risk”? T hose with irregular attendance. Those who are two years or more below grade level. Those who show a disinterest in school. Those who come from families with either a low or high income. Those who are overage for their grade. Those who are discipline problems. Those with a language deficit. Those who are teen parents. What Places Students At-RiskStudent-Related Factors Poor school attitude Low ability level Attendance/truancy Behavior /discipline problems Pregnancy Drug abuse Poor peer relationships Nonparticipation Friends have dropped out Illness/disability Low self-esteem What Places Students At-Risk?Family-Related Factors Low SES Non-English-speaking home Ineffective parenting/abuse Low parental expectations Dysfunctional home life No parent involvement High mobility Low educational level What Places Students At-Risk?School-Related Factors Conflict between home/school culture Ineffective discipline system Lack of adequate counseling Negative school climate Retentions/Suspensions What Places Students At-Risk?School-Related Factors Disregard of student learning styles Inappropriate use of technology Passive instructional strategies Lack of language instruction Lack of relevant curriculum Low expectations What Places Students At-Risk?Community-Related Factors Lack of community support services Lack of community support for schools Lack of recreational activities High incidences of criminal activities Lack of school/community linkages High poverty Alternative SchoolingTypes: School-Within-A-School Residential Separate Alternative College-Based Magnet Charter Effective Strategies Early Interventions Basic Core Strategies Instructional Practices Making the Most of Community Resources Early Interventions “Family Involvement” Effective Programs Use a Wide-Angle Approach With Children At-Risk Family members Employers Community agencies Educational System Obstacles to Family Involvement Language barrier Negative School History Transportation Difficulties Lack of Time Lack of teacher training in how to get parents involved Lack of Stamina Other priorities Schools are closed when parents can come Take care of other children Disruption of normal routine Parents work schedule Reading and Writing Programs Most Successful Programs Have a real-world application Develop communication skills Foster a love of reading Include computer skills Include math skills Mentoring and Tutoring Major Goals Academic achievement Career preparation Behavior modification Parenting skills Social enrichment Service-Learning : Foxfire High School Meeting Kids’ Needs HELPING STUDENTS GRADUATEStrategies and Tools To Help At-Risk Learners Graduate Franklin Schargel Every School Day Every school day 181 school buses loaded with children leave school never to return. That is the number of students who drop out EVERY SCHOOL DAY What Is “At-Risk”? An at-risk student is “someone who is unlikely to graduate on schedule with both the skills and the self-esteem necessary to exercise meaningful options in the areas of work, leisure, culture, civic affairs, and inter/intrapersonal relationships”. Richard Sagor At-Risk of What? Failing subjects Going into poverty Being held back Becoming pregnant Losing self-esteem Joining a gang Being frustrated At-Risk of What? Marrying someone at-risk Dropping out Raising at-risk children Not getting a job Not able to thrive in the 21st century Getting a low-paying job Using alcohol/drugs Who is Most “At-Risk”? T hose with irregular attendance. Those who are two years or more below grade level. Those who show a disinterest in school. Those who come from families with either a low or high income. Those who are overage for their grade. Those who are discipline problems. Those with a language deficit. Those who are teen parents. What Places Students At-RiskStudent-Related Factors Poor school attitude Low ability level Attendance/truancy Behavior /discipline problems Pregnancy Drug abuse Poor peer relationships Nonparticipation Friends have dropped out Illness/disability Low self-esteem What Places Students At-Risk?Family-Related Factors Low SES Non-English-speaking home Ineffective parenting/abuse Low parental expectations Dysfunctional home life No parent involvement High mobility Low educational level What Places Students At-Risk?School-Related Factors Conflict between home/school culture Ineffective discipline system Lack of adequate counseling Negative school climate Retentions/Suspensions What Places Students At-Risk?School-Related Factors Disregard of student learning styles Inappropriate use of technology Passive instructional strategies Lack of language instruction Lack of relevant curriculum Low expectations What Places Students At-Risk?Community-Related Factors Lack of community support services Lack of community support for schools Lack of recreational activities High incidences of criminal activities Lack of school/community linkages High poverty Alternative SchoolingTypes: School-Within-A-School Residential Separate Alternative College-Based Magnet Charter Effective Strategies Early Interventions Basic Core Strategies Instructional Practices Making the Most of Community Resources Early Interventions “Family Involvement” Effective Programs Use a Wide-Angle Approach With Children At-Risk Family members Employers Community agencies Educational System Obstacles to Family Involvement Language barrier Negative School History Transportation Difficulties Lack of Time Lack of teacher training in how to get parents involved Lack of Stamina Other priorities Schools are closed when parents can come Take care of other children Disruption of normal routine Parents work schedule Reading and Writing Programs Most Successful Programs Have a real-world application Develop communication skills Foster a love of reading Include computer skills Include math skills Mentoring and Tutoring Major Goals Academic achievement Career preparation Behavior modification Parenting skills Social enrichment Service-Learning Importance Facilitates teaching and learning Integrates learning and service Requires collaboration with community Connects learning to life Develops sense of caring Fosters respect for self and others Professional Development: Foxfire High School Meeting Kids’ Needs HELPING STUDENTS GRADUATEStrategies and Tools To Help At-Risk Learners Graduate Franklin Schargel Every School Day Every school day 181 school buses loaded with children leave school never to return. That is the number of students who drop out EVERY SCHOOL DAY What Is “At-Risk”? An at-risk student is “someone who is unlikely to graduate on schedule with both the skills and the self-esteem necessary to exercise meaningful options in the areas of work, leisure, culture, civic affairs, and inter/intrapersonal relationships”. Richard Sagor At-Risk of What? Failing subjects Going into poverty Being held back Becoming pregnant Losing self-esteem Joining a gang Being frustrated At-Risk of What? Marrying someone at-risk Dropping out Raising at-risk children Not getting a job Not able to thrive in the 21st century Getting a low-paying job Using alcohol/drugs Who is Most “At-Risk”? T hose with irregular attendance. Those who are two years or more below grade level. Those who show a disinterest in school. Those who come from families with either a low or high income. Those who are overage for their grade. Those who are discipline problems. Those with a language deficit. Those who are teen parents. What Places Students At-RiskStudent-Related Factors Poor school attitude Low ability level Attendance/truancy Behavior /discipline problems Pregnancy Drug abuse Poor peer relationships Nonparticipation Friends have dropped out Illness/disability Low self-esteem What Places Students At-Risk?Family-Related Factors Low SES Non-English-speaking home Ineffective parenting/abuse Low parental expectations Dysfunctional home life No parent involvement High mobility Low educational level What Places Students At-Risk?School-Related Factors Conflict between home/school culture Ineffective discipline system Lack of adequate counseling Negative school climate Retentions/Suspensions What Places Students At-Risk?School-Related Factors Disregard of student learning styles Inappropriate use of technology Passive instructional strategies Lack of language instruction Lack of relevant curriculum Low expectations What Places Students At-Risk?Community-Related Factors Lack of community support services Lack of community support for schools Lack of recreational activities High incidences of criminal activities Lack of school/community linkages High poverty Alternative SchoolingTypes: School-Within-A-School Residential Separate Alternative College-Based Magnet Charter Effective Strategies Early Interventions Basic Core Strategies Instructional Practices Making the Most of Community Resources Early Interventions “Family Involvement” Effective Programs Use a Wide-Angle Approach With Children At-Risk Family members Employers Community agencies Educational System Obstacles to Family Involvement Language barrier Negative School History Transportation Difficulties Lack of Time Lack of teacher training in how to get parents involved Lack of Stamina Other priorities Schools are closed when parents can come Take care of other children Disruption of normal routine Parents work schedule Reading and Writing Programs Most Successful Programs Have a real-world application Develop communication skills Foster a love of reading Include computer skills Include math skills Mentoring and Tutoring Major Goals Academic achievement Career preparation Behavior modification Parenting skills Social enrichment Service-Learning Importance Facilitates teaching and learning Integrates learning and service Requires collaboration with community Connects learning to life Develops sense of caring Fosters respect for self and others Professional Development Effective Programs Long-term, school-based Include demonstration, practice, and feedback Comprehensive staff involvement Sufficient time and resources Active Learning: Foxfire High School Meeting Kids’ Needs HELPING STUDENTS GRADUATEStrategies and Tools To Help At-Risk Learners Graduate Franklin Schargel Every School Day Every school day 181 school buses loaded with children leave school never to return. That is the number of students who drop out EVERY SCHOOL DAY What Is “At-Risk”? An at-risk student is “someone who is unlikely to graduate on schedule with both the skills and the self-esteem necessary to exercise meaningful options in the areas of work, leisure, culture, civic affairs, and inter/intrapersonal relationships”. Richard Sagor At-Risk of What? Failing subjects Going into poverty Being held back Becoming pregnant Losing self-esteem Joining a gang Being frustrated At-Risk of What? Marrying someone at-risk Dropping out Raising at-risk children Not getting a job Not able to thrive in the 21st century Getting a low-paying job Using alcohol/drugs Who is Most “At-Risk”? T hose with irregular attendance. Those who are two years or more below grade level. Those who show a disinterest in school. Those who come from families with either a low or high income. Those who are overage for their grade. Those who are discipline problems. Those with a language deficit. Those who are teen parents. What Places Students At-RiskStudent-Related Factors Poor school attitude Low ability level Attendance/truancy Behavior /discipline problems Pregnancy Drug abuse Poor peer relationships Nonparticipation Friends have dropped out Illness/disability Low self-esteem What Places Students At-Risk?Family-Related Factors Low SES Non-English-speaking home Ineffective parenting/abuse Low parental expectations Dysfunctional home life No parent involvement High mobility Low educational level What Places Students At-Risk?School-Related Factors Conflict between home/school culture Ineffective discipline system Lack of adequate counseling Negative school climate Retentions/Suspensions What Places Students At-Risk?School-Related Factors Disregard of student learning styles Inappropriate use of technology Passive instructional strategies Lack of language instruction Lack of relevant curriculum Low expectations What Places Students At-Risk?Community-Related Factors Lack of community support services Lack of community support for schools Lack of recreational activities High incidences of criminal activities Lack of school/community linkages High poverty Alternative SchoolingTypes: School-Within-A-School Residential Separate Alternative College-Based Magnet Charter Effective Strategies Early Interventions Basic Core Strategies Instructional Practices Making the Most of Community Resources Early Interventions “Family Involvement” Effective Programs Use a Wide-Angle Approach With Children At-Risk Family members Employers Community agencies Educational System Obstacles to Family Involvement Language barrier Negative School History Transportation Difficulties Lack of Time Lack of teacher training in how to get parents involved Lack of Stamina Other priorities Schools are closed when parents can come Take care of other children Disruption of normal routine Parents work schedule Reading and Writing Programs Most Successful Programs Have a real-world application Develop communication skills Foster a love of reading Include computer skills Include math skills Mentoring and Tutoring Major Goals Academic achievement Career preparation Behavior modification Parenting skills Social enrichment Service-Learning Importance Facilitates teaching and learning Integrates learning and service Requires collaboration with community Connects learning to life Develops sense of caring Fosters respect for self and others Professional Development Effective Programs Long-term, school-based Include demonstration, practice, and feedback Comprehensive staff involvement Sufficient time and resources Active Learning Basic Ideas of Learning Styles Multiple Intelligence - Nine Intelligences Different processes of learning Students’ preferred learning style Require different teaching methods Instructional Technologies: Foxfire High School Meeting Kids’ Needs HELPING STUDENTS GRADUATEStrategies and Tools To Help At-Risk Learners Graduate Franklin Schargel Every School Day Every school day 181 school buses loaded with children leave school never to return. That is the number of students who drop out EVERY SCHOOL DAY What Is “At-Risk”? An at-risk student is “someone who is unlikely to graduate on schedule with both the skills and the self-esteem necessary to exercise meaningful options in the areas of work, leisure, culture, civic affairs, and inter/intrapersonal relationships”. Richard Sagor At-Risk of What? Failing subjects Going into poverty Being held back Becoming pregnant Losing self-esteem Joining a gang Being frustrated At-Risk of What? Marrying someone at-risk Dropping out Raising at-risk children Not getting a job Not able to thrive in the 21st century Getting a low-paying job Using alcohol/drugs Who is Most “At-Risk”? T hose with irregular attendance. Those who are two years or more below grade level. Those who show a disinterest in school. Those who come from families with either a low or high income. Those who are overage for their grade. Those who are discipline problems. Those with a language deficit. Those who are teen parents. What Places Students At-RiskStudent-Related Factors Poor school attitude Low ability level Attendance/truancy Behavior /discipline problems Pregnancy Drug abuse Poor peer relationships Nonparticipation Friends have dropped out Illness/disability Low self-esteem What Places Students At-Risk?Family-Related Factors Low SES Non-English-speaking home Ineffective parenting/abuse Low parental expectations Dysfunctional home life No parent involvement High mobility Low educational level What Places Students At-Risk?School-Related Factors Conflict between home/school culture Ineffective discipline system Lack of adequate counseling Negative school climate Retentions/Suspensions What Places Students At-Risk?School-Related Factors Disregard of student learning styles Inappropriate use of technology Passive instructional strategies Lack of language instruction Lack of relevant curriculum Low expectations What Places Students At-Risk?Community-Related Factors Lack of community support services Lack of community support for schools Lack of recreational activities High incidences of criminal activities Lack of school/community linkages High poverty Alternative SchoolingTypes: School-Within-A-School Residential Separate Alternative College-Based Magnet Charter Effective Strategies Early Interventions Basic Core Strategies Instructional Practices Making the Most of Community Resources Early Interventions “Family Involvement” Effective Programs Use a Wide-Angle Approach With Children At-Risk Family members Employers Community agencies Educational System Obstacles to Family Involvement Language barrier Negative School History Transportation Difficulties Lack of Time Lack of teacher training in how to get parents involved Lack of Stamina Other priorities Schools are closed when parents can come Take care of other children Disruption of normal routine Parents work schedule Reading and Writing Programs Most Successful Programs Have a real-world application Develop communication skills Foster a love of reading Include computer skills Include math skills Mentoring and Tutoring Major Goals Academic achievement Career preparation Behavior modification Parenting skills Social enrichment Service-Learning Importance Facilitates teaching and learning Integrates learning and service Requires collaboration with community Connects learning to life Develops sense of caring Fosters respect for self and others Professional Development Effective Programs Long-term, school-based Include demonstration, practice, and feedback Comprehensive staff involvement Sufficient time and resources Active Learning Basic Ideas of Learning Styles Multiple Intelligence - Nine Intelligences Different processes of learning Students’ preferred learning style Require different teaching methods Instructional Technologies Benefits Address individual learning styles Provide active learning opportunities Promote collaborative learning Improve students’ attitudes Engage student interest Reduce inequities Individualized Instruction: Foxfire High School Meeting Kids’ Needs HELPING STUDENTS GRADUATEStrategies and Tools To Help At-Risk Learners Graduate Franklin Schargel Every School Day Every school day 181 school buses loaded with children leave school never to return. That is the number of students who drop out EVERY SCHOOL DAY What Is “At-Risk”? An at-risk student is “someone who is unlikely to graduate on schedule with both the skills and the self-esteem necessary to exercise meaningful options in the areas of work, leisure, culture, civic affairs, and inter/intrapersonal relationships”. Richard Sagor At-Risk of What? Failing subjects Going into poverty Being held back Becoming pregnant Losing self-esteem Joining a gang Being frustrated At-Risk of What? Marrying someone at-risk Dropping out Raising at-risk children Not getting a job Not able to thrive in the 21st century Getting a low-paying job Using alcohol/drugs Who is Most “At-Risk”? T hose with irregular attendance. Those who are two years or more below grade level. Those who show a disinterest in school. Those who come from families with either a low or high income. Those who are overage for their grade. Those who are discipline problems. Those with a language deficit. Those who are teen parents. What Places Students At-RiskStudent-Related Factors Poor school attitude Low ability level Attendance/truancy Behavior /discipline problems Pregnancy Drug abuse Poor peer relationships Nonparticipation Friends have dropped out Illness/disability Low self-esteem What Places Students At-Risk?Family-Related Factors Low SES Non-English-speaking home Ineffective parenting/abuse Low parental expectations Dysfunctional home life No parent involvement High mobility Low educational level What Places Students At-Risk?School-Related Factors Conflict between home/school culture Ineffective discipline system Lack of adequate counseling Negative school climate Retentions/Suspensions What Places Students At-Risk?School-Related Factors Disregard of student learning styles Inappropriate use of technology Passive instructional strategies Lack of language instruction Lack of relevant curriculum Low expectations What Places Students At-Risk?Community-Related Factors Lack of community support services Lack of community support for schools Lack of recreational activities High incidences of criminal activities Lack of school/community linkages High poverty Alternative SchoolingTypes: School-Within-A-School Residential Separate Alternative College-Based Magnet Charter Effective Strategies Early Interventions Basic Core Strategies Instructional Practices Making the Most of Community Resources Early Interventions “Family Involvement” Effective Programs Use a Wide-Angle Approach With Children At-Risk Family members Employers Community agencies Educational System Obstacles to Family Involvement Language barrier Negative School History Transportation Difficulties Lack of Time Lack of teacher training in how to get parents involved Lack of Stamina Other priorities Schools are closed when parents can come Take care of other children Disruption of normal routine Parents work schedule Reading and Writing Programs Most Successful Programs Have a real-world application Develop communication skills Foster a love of reading Include computer skills Include math skills Mentoring and Tutoring Major Goals Academic achievement Career preparation Behavior modification Parenting skills Social enrichment Service-Learning Importance Facilitates teaching and learning Integrates learning and service Requires collaboration with community Connects learning to life Develops sense of caring Fosters respect for self and others Professional Development Effective Programs Long-term, school-based Include demonstration, practice, and feedback Comprehensive staff involvement Sufficient time and resources Active Learning Basic Ideas of Learning Styles Multiple Intelligence - Nine Intelligences Different processes of learning Students’ preferred learning style Require different teaching methods Instructional Technologies Benefits Address individual learning styles Provide active learning opportunities Promote collaborative learning Improve students’ attitudes Engage student interest Reduce inequities Individualized Instruction Individualize Instruction for All Students Modified case management—counseling and social services Mentoring and tutoring Instructional technology Learning styles Alternative schools Community Collaboration: Foxfire High School Meeting Kids’ Needs HELPING STUDENTS GRADUATEStrategies and Tools To Help At-Risk Learners Graduate Franklin Schargel Every School Day Every school day 181 school buses loaded with children leave school never to return. That is the number of students who drop out EVERY SCHOOL DAY What Is “At-Risk”? An at-risk student is “someone who is unlikely to graduate on schedule with both the skills and the self-esteem necessary to exercise meaningful options in the areas of work, leisure, culture, civic affairs, and inter/intrapersonal relationships”. Richard Sagor At-Risk of What? Failing subjects Going into poverty Being held back Becoming pregnant Losing self-esteem Joining a gang Being frustrated At-Risk of What? Marrying someone at-risk Dropping out Raising at-risk children Not getting a job Not able to thrive in the 21st century Getting a low-paying job Using alcohol/drugs Who is Most “At-Risk”? T hose with irregular attendance. Those who are two years or more below grade level. Those who show a disinterest in school. Those who come from families with either a low or high income. Those who are overage for their grade. Those who are discipline problems. Those with a language deficit. Those who are teen parents. What Places Students At-RiskStudent-Related Factors Poor school attitude Low ability level Attendance/truancy Behavior /discipline problems Pregnancy Drug abuse Poor peer relationships Nonparticipation Friends have dropped out Illness/disability Low self-esteem What Places Students At-Risk?Family-Related Factors Low SES Non-English-speaking home Ineffective parenting/abuse Low parental expectations Dysfunctional home life No parent involvement High mobility Low educational level What Places Students At-Risk?School-Related Factors Conflict between home/school culture Ineffective discipline system Lack of adequate counseling Negative school climate Retentions/Suspensions What Places Students At-Risk?School-Related Factors Disregard of student learning styles Inappropriate use of technology Passive instructional strategies Lack of language instruction Lack of relevant curriculum Low expectations What Places Students At-Risk?Community-Related Factors Lack of community support services Lack of community support for schools Lack of recreational activities High incidences of criminal activities Lack of school/community linkages High poverty Alternative SchoolingTypes: School-Within-A-School Residential Separate Alternative College-Based Magnet Charter Effective Strategies Early Interventions Basic Core Strategies Instructional Practices Making the Most of Community Resources Early Interventions “Family Involvement” Effective Programs Use a Wide-Angle Approach With Children At-Risk Family members Employers Community agencies Educational System Obstacles to Family Involvement Language barrier Negative School History Transportation Difficulties Lack of Time Lack of teacher training in how to get parents involved Lack of Stamina Other priorities Schools are closed when parents can come Take care of other children Disruption of normal routine Parents work schedule Reading and Writing Programs Most Successful Programs Have a real-world application Develop communication skills Foster a love of reading Include computer skills Include math skills Mentoring and Tutoring Major Goals Academic achievement Career preparation Behavior modification Parenting skills Social enrichment Service-Learning Importance Facilitates teaching and learning Integrates learning and service Requires collaboration with community Connects learning to life Develops sense of caring Fosters respect for self and others Professional Development Effective Programs Long-term, school-based Include demonstration, practice, and feedback Comprehensive staff involvement Sufficient time and resources Active Learning Basic Ideas of Learning Styles Multiple Intelligence - Nine Intelligences Different processes of learning Students’ preferred learning style Require different teaching methods Instructional Technologies Benefits Address individual learning styles Provide active learning opportunities Promote collaborative learning Improve students’ attitudes Engage student interest Reduce inequities Individualized Instruction Individualize Instruction for All Students Modified case management—counseling and social services Mentoring and tutoring Instructional technology Learning styles Alternative schools Community Collaboration Schools Cannot Do It Alone Community agencies Faith-based community Business/Industry Volunteers Parents Workforce Readiness Career Education: Foxfire High School Meeting Kids’ Needs HELPING STUDENTS GRADUATEStrategies and Tools To Help At-Risk Learners Graduate Franklin Schargel Every School Day Every school day 181 school buses loaded with children leave school never to return. That is the number of students who drop out EVERY SCHOOL DAY What Is “At-Risk”? An at-risk student is “someone who is unlikely to graduate on schedule with both the skills and the self-esteem necessary to exercise meaningful options in the areas of work, leisure, culture, civic affairs, and inter/intrapersonal relationships”. Richard Sagor At-Risk of What? Failing subjects Going into poverty Being held back Becoming pregnant Losing self-esteem Joining a gang Being frustrated At-Risk of What? Marrying someone at-risk Dropping out Raising at-risk children Not getting a job Not able to thrive in the 21st century Getting a low-paying job Using alcohol/drugs Who is Most “At-Risk”? T hose with irregular attendance. Those who are two years or more below grade level. Those who show a disinterest in school. Those who come from families with either a low or high income. Those who are overage for their grade. Those who are discipline problems. Those with a language deficit. Those who are teen parents. What Places Students At-RiskStudent-Related Factors Poor school attitude Low ability level Attendance/truancy Behavior /discipline problems Pregnancy Drug abuse Poor peer relationships Nonparticipation Friends have dropped out Illness/disability Low self-esteem What Places Students At-Risk?Family-Related Factors Low SES Non-English-speaking home Ineffective parenting/abuse Low parental expectations Dysfunctional home life No parent involvement High mobility Low educational level What Places Students At-Risk?School-Related Factors Conflict between home/school culture Ineffective discipline system Lack of adequate counseling Negative school climate Retentions/Suspensions What Places Students At-Risk?School-Related Factors Disregard of student learning styles Inappropriate use of technology Passive instructional strategies Lack of language instruction Lack of relevant curriculum Low expectations What Places Students At-Risk?Community-Related Factors Lack of community support services Lack of community support for schools Lack of recreational activities High incidences of criminal activities Lack of school/community linkages High poverty Alternative SchoolingTypes: School-Within-A-School Residential Separate Alternative College-Based Magnet Charter Effective Strategies Early Interventions Basic Core Strategies Instructional Practices Making the Most of Community Resources Early Interventions “Family Involvement” Effective Programs Use a Wide-Angle Approach With Children At-Risk Family members Employers Community agencies Educational System Obstacles to Family Involvement Language barrier Negative School History Transportation Difficulties Lack of Time Lack of teacher training in how to get parents involved Lack of Stamina Other priorities Schools are closed when parents can come Take care of other children Disruption of normal routine Parents work schedule Reading and Writing Programs Most Successful Programs Have a real-world application Develop communication skills Foster a love of reading Include computer skills Include math skills Mentoring and Tutoring Major Goals Academic achievement Career preparation Behavior modification Parenting skills Social enrichment Service-Learning Importance Facilitates teaching and learning Integrates learning and service Requires collaboration with community Connects learning to life Develops sense of caring Fosters respect for self and others Professional Development Effective Programs Long-term, school-based Include demonstration, practice, and feedback Comprehensive staff involvement Sufficient time and resources Active Learning Basic Ideas of Learning Styles Multiple Intelligence - Nine Intelligences Different processes of learning Students’ preferred learning style Require different teaching methods Instructional Technologies Benefits Address individual learning styles Provide active learning opportunities Promote collaborative learning Improve students’ attitudes Engage student interest Reduce inequities Individualized Instruction Individualize Instruction for All Students Modified case management—counseling and social services Mentoring and tutoring Instructional technology Learning styles Alternative schools Community Collaboration Schools Cannot Do It Alone Community agencies Faith-based community Business/Industry Volunteers Parents Workforce Readiness Career Education For All Students K-12 Is supportive, goal-oriented Creates awareness of possibilities Provides needed experiences Develops work-place skills Encourages positive habits Violence Prevention: Foxfire High School Meeting Kids’ Needs HELPING STUDENTS GRADUATEStrategies and Tools To Help At-Risk Learners Graduate Franklin Schargel Every School Day Every school day 181 school buses loaded with children leave school never to return. That is the number of students who drop out EVERY SCHOOL DAY What Is “At-Risk”? An at-risk student is “someone who is unlikely to graduate on schedule with both the skills and the self-esteem necessary to exercise meaningful options in the areas of work, leisure, culture, civic affairs, and inter/intrapersonal relationships”. Richard Sagor At-Risk of What? Failing subjects Going into poverty Being held back Becoming pregnant Losing self-esteem Joining a gang Being frustrated At-Risk of What? Marrying someone at-risk Dropping out Raising at-risk children Not getting a job Not able to thrive in the 21st century Getting a low-paying job Using alcohol/drugs Who is Most “At-Risk”? T hose with irregular attendance. Those who are two years or more below grade level. Those who show a disinterest in school. Those who come from families with either a low or high income. Those who are overage for their grade. Those who are discipline problems. Those with a language deficit. Those who are teen parents. What Places Students At-RiskStudent-Related Factors Poor school attitude Low ability level Attendance/truancy Behavior /discipline problems Pregnancy Drug abuse Poor peer relationships Nonparticipation Friends have dropped out Illness/disability Low self-esteem What Places Students At-Risk?Family-Related Factors Low SES Non-English-speaking home Ineffective parenting/abuse Low parental expectations Dysfunctional home life No parent involvement High mobility Low educational level What Places Students At-Risk?School-Related Factors Conflict between home/school culture Ineffective discipline system Lack of adequate counseling Negative school climate Retentions/Suspensions What Places Students At-Risk?School-Related Factors Disregard of student learning styles Inappropriate use of technology Passive instructional strategies Lack of language instruction Lack of relevant curriculum Low expectations What Places Students At-Risk?Community-Related Factors Lac

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