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final mccc yougov report

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Information about final mccc yougov report
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Published on December 30, 2007

Author: UpBeat

Source: authorstream.com

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Views about dying at home: Survey of the UK general public:  Views about dying at home: Survey of the UK general public February 2004 Contents:  Contents Methodology Executive Summary Where people would prefer to die Experiences of people who have lost friends/family members to cancer Choosing to die at home: awareness Choosing to die at home: practical concerns Choosing to die at home: emotional concerns Adopting the carer role Social context of the debate Impact of information on choosing to die at home Methodology:  Methodology KRC Research was commissioned by Marie Curie to conduct an online survey of the general public across the UK. In Great Britain, a total of 2543 respondents from YouGov’s internet panel completed online questionnaires, and YouGov’s weighting system was applied to achieve data that was nationally representative. In Northern Ireland, a sample of 287 people who were representative of the region in terms of age and gender were surveyed using online questionnaires. Because of the different methodology, data for Northern Ireland are presented separately from the other regions of the UK. The overall margin of error for the data from Great Britain is plus or minus 2% at the 95% confidence level. Results for subsets of the data will have larger margins of error (for Northern Ireland, the margin of error is 6%). Unless otherwise indicated, results are for the entire sample. Some percentages do not total 100% as the “don’t know/no response” options are not always shown, and due to rounding. Executive Summary:  Executive Summary Where people would prefer to die Only 4% of Britons would prefer to die in hospital. The majority (64%) would prefer to die in their own home whilst just under a quarter (23%) would prefer to die in a hospice. Figures in Northern Ireland were remarkably similar. Experiences of people who have lost friends/family members to cancer Nearly seven in ten (69% in Britain and 68% in Northern Ireland) say a friend or family member has died of cancer. The most common place for the loved one to have died was a hospital, followed by home deaths. People are much more likely to express regret about where their friend/family member died if that person died in a hospital than at home. A majority (63% in Britain, 71% N. Ireland) of those with regret about where their friend/family member died wish the death had been at home. Half (52% Britain, 58% N. Ireland) of those without regrets say the same. Choosing to die at home: awareness of options The majority of respondents (58% Britain, 66% N. Ireland) are aware that cancer patients can choose to die at home, including 26% who say they are “very aware”. Executive Summary:  Executive Summary Choosing to die at home: practical and emotional concerns The most highly-rated reason for dying at home in Britain is to be close to friends, family and pets. The biggest perceived practical obstacle to dying at home is the constraints of time and physical effort it would put on friends and family. The biggest emotional concern is that it would be too much for family and friends to manage emotionally. Those in Northern Ireland give the same pattern of rankings for reasons, practical obstacles and emotional concerns. Adopting the carer role Access to an experienced cancer care nurse is rated more important than any other type of outside support for people taking on the role of caring for a dying person. Access to a GP is rated next most important. Most respondents in Britain and Northern Ireland say that, theoretically, they would be likely to support the choice of someone they knew to die at home. In contrast, when asked to say realistically whether they feel capable of supporting a dying friend or relative, less than half say they do. Women and older respondents feel more able to provide this care. Executive Summary:  Executive Summary Social context of the debate Three-quarters (76% in Great Britain, 87% in N. Ireland) believe the government is the most appropriate source of funding for the resources that terminally ill patients need to die at home. Less than 5% believe charities is an appropriate source. Just under eight in ten Britons (79%) believe that death is a taboo subject, with a similar proportion sharing this perception in Northern Ireland (72%). The older the respondent the more likely it is for them to say so. Impact of information on choosing to die at home After being informed about Marie Curie and the free nursing support it offers for terminally ill cancer patients wishing to die at home, there was a 8% shift from 64% to 72% in the number of British respondents who say they would prefer to die at home. The biggest shift was amongst those who had originally opted for a hospice (581 respondents), where 28% now said they would prefer to die at home In Northern Ireland, the shift towards preference for a home death was smaller. Where people would prefer to die:  Where people would prefer to die Overall, when asked where they would like to die, the majority of Britons (64%) would prefer to die in their own home If you were terminally ill, in which of the following places would you most want to die? (N=2542) Overall - Great Britain Where people would prefer to die:  Where people would prefer to die With increasing age, people seem more likely to prefer a hospice, and less likely to prefer a death at home. The 18-29 age group is the most likely to prefer to die at home (77%), followed by 30-50 year olds (67%), and only a little more than half of the over-50s (55%). A hospice is the preferred location for 35% of the over-50s, compared with 19% of 30-50 year olds and just 5% of 18-29 year olds. Women are more likely to say they would prefer a hospice death (26%) than men (19%). Overall, respondents from the West Midlands are the most likely to prefer to die at home (75%), and respondents from Wales are the least likely to want to die at home (55%). Demographic differences in Great Britain Where people would prefer to die:  Where people would prefer to die Mirroring the British data, when asked where they would like to die, the majority of people in Northern Ireland (65%) would prefer to die in their own home If you were terminally ill, in which of the following places would you most want to die? (N=287) Overall – Northern Ireland Experiences of people who have lost friends/family members to cancer:  Experiences of people who have lost friends/family members to cancer Nearly seven in ten Britons (69%) say a friend or family member has died of cancer Have you experienced a friend or family member dying of cancer? (N=2542) Overall – Great Britain Experiences of people who have lost friends/family members to cancer:  Experiences of people who have lost friends/family members to cancer As in Britain, nearly seven in ten people in Northern Ireland (68%) say a friend or family member has died of cancer Have you experienced a friend or family member dying of cancer? (N=2542) Overall – Northern Ireland Experiences of people who have lost friends/family members to cancer:  Experiences of people who have lost friends/family members to cancer Of those Britons who have experienced a friend or family member dying of cancer, half (49%) say the death happened in hospital, about a third (32%) in the person’s own home or the home of a family member, and about one in six (16%) in a hospice. [If you have experienced a friend or family member dying of cancer] Where did they die? (N=1751) Overall – Great Britain Experiences of people who have lost friends/family members to cancer:  Experiences of people who have lost friends/family members to cancer Respondents in the Trent region (44%) are the most likely to have a friend or family member who died at home. In contrast, respondents in London (19%) are the least likely to have a friend or family member who died at home. Demographic differences in Great Britain Experiences of people who have lost friends/family members to cancer:  Experiences of people who have lost friends/family members to cancer Of those in Northern Ireland who have experienced a friend or family member dying of cancer, four in ten (42%) say the death happened in hospital, about a third (34%) in the person’s own home, and about one in five (21%) in a hospice. This is a similar picture to that found in Great Britain. Overall – Northern Ireland [If you have experienced a friend or family member dying of cancer] Where did they die? (N=193) Experiences of people who have lost friends/family members to cancer:  Experiences of people who have lost friends/family members to cancer [if you have experienced a friend or family member dying of cancer] do you regret where they died? (N=1751) Britons who have lost someone to cancer are reluctant to express regrets about where the person died (69% expressing no regrets). However, Britons are much more likely to express regret if that person died in a hospital than at home. Overall – Great Britain % expressing “some” or “a great deal” of regret if the person died in a hospital, in a hospice, or at home Experiences of people who have lost friends/family members to cancer:  Experiences of people who have lost friends/family members to cancer Demographic differences in Great Britain Women express more regret than men. Almost a third of women (32%) express some or a great deal of regret about where their friend or family member died, compared to 24% of men. The sex difference was most dramatic among those whose friend or relative died at hospital: only 36% of men expressed regrets, compared with 54% of women. For home deaths, the level of regret was essentially the same for men (10%) as for women (8%). Those in the West Midlands are the least likely to have regrets (20%), and those in London and in North Eastern England and Yorkshire are the most likely to have regrets (31% each). Experiences of people who have lost friends/family members to cancer:  Experiences of people who have lost friends/family members to cancer [if you have experienced a friend or family member dying of cancer] do you regret where they died? (N=193) People in Northern Ireland were even more reluctant to admit regrets about where their loved one died (77% expressed no regrets). Once again, however, regrets were much more likely about a death that had occurred in hospital, versus at home Overall – Northern Ireland % expressing “some” or “a great deal” of regret if the person died in a hospital, in a hospice, or at home Experiences of people who have lost friends/family members to cancer:  Experiences of people who have lost friends/family members to cancer Fitting with the finding that regret was most likely following a hospital death, and least likely following a home death, a majority of Britons with regrets indicate that they would have preferred their loved one to have died at home (63%). Even among those without regrets, about half (52%) express preference for their friend or family member to have died at home. [if you have experienced a friend or family member dying of cancer and you regret where they died] where would you have preferred they die? (N=1749) Overall – Great Britain Experiences of people who have lost friends/family members to cancer:  Experiences of people who have lost friends/family members to cancer Demographic differences – Great Britain Among those who lost someone to cancer, men are more likely to prefer that their loved ones die in hospital (5%) than women (1%). Women are slightly more likely to prefer a home death (64%) for a dying friend or relative, compared to men (61%). Younger people are far more likely to prefer a home death for their friends and relatives, with 76% of 18-29 year olds preferring a home death, compared to just 63% of 30-50 year olds and only 57% of the over-50s. Conversely, the youngest group was much less likely to prefer a hospice death (15%) than was the case for 30-50 year olds (28%) or the over-50s (39%). Preferences for a home death for loved ones was highest in Scotland (81%), where hospices were least popular (16%), and lowest in the West Midlands (43%), where hospices were most popular (46%). Preferences for a hospital death were highest in the Trent region (7%), and actually 0% in South Eastern England. Experiences of people who have lost friends/family members to cancer:  Experiences of people who have lost friends/family members to cancer In Northern Ireland, there was an even stronger preference for loved ones to have had a home death, even among those people who had no regrets (58%) as well as those who did express regrets (71%) [if you have experienced a friend or family member dying of cancer and you regret where they died] where would you have preferred they die? (N=195) Overall – Northern Ireland Choosing to die at home: awareness:  Choosing to die at home: awareness It is possible for terminally ill cancer patients to die at home. How aware were you that this choice was possible? (N=2543) A majority of respondents (58%) are aware that cancer patients can choose to die at home including 26% who say they are “very aware”. Overall – Great Britain Somewhat surprisingly, awareness was similar for those who had lost a friend or relative to cancer (60%) as for those who had not (58%). Choosing to die at home: awareness:  Choosing to die at home: awareness Demographic differences – Great Britain Awareness is lower among the youngest group (51% of 18-29 year olds were somewhat or very aware), than the oldest age group (64% of over-50s were somewhat or very aware), with the 30-50 age group falling in between (58% somewhat or very aware). Respondents in Wales (70%) are the most likely to be aware about the choice of terminally ill patients to die at home, whereas North Western (55%) and South Eastern England (55%) are the least likely to be aware. Choosing to die at home: awareness:  Choosing to die at home: awareness It is possible for terminally ill cancer patients to die at home. How aware were you that this choice was possible? (N=287) Awareness that cancer patients can choose to die at home was slightly higher in Northern Ireland (66%), with 31% saying they are “very aware” Overall – Northern Ireland Again, awareness was surprisingly similar for those who had lost a friend or relative to cancer (66%) as for those who had not (64%). Choosing to die at home: reasons for choosing home:  Choosing to die at home: reasons for choosing home If you chose to die at home, how important would the following factors be in making that choice? (N=2542) In Britain, the most highly-rated reason for choosing to die at home is closeness to friends, family and pets (rated 4.6 on average on a scale from 1 = not at all important, to 5 =very important). Next most important is being in familiar surroundings (4.4), followed by having more privacy and dignity at home (4.2) and family wanting you at home (4.1). Least important of all is not liking the idea of dying in hospitals (3.5) Overall – Great Britain Choosing to die at home: reasons for choosing home:  Choosing to die at home: reasons for choosing home Demographic differences in Great Britain The rank ordering of the choices was remarkably consistent across demographic factors: men and women had identical rankings, as did the different age groups. Trent, the smallest regional group, is the only region to deviate substantially from the overall pattern. “Because your family wants you at home”, which overall is ranked only fourth, is rated by this group in joint first place (4.3), alongside closeness to family, friends and pets (4.3) and having more privacy and dignity (4.3). Familiarity of surroundings falls to fourth place in this group (4.2). Choosing to die at home: reasons for choosing home:  Choosing to die at home: reasons for choosing home If you chose to die at home, how important would the following factors be in making that choice? (N=287) Reasons why people would choose a home death were also remarkably similar in Northern Ireland. The most highly-rated reason for choosing to die at home is again, closeness to friends, family and pets (rated 4.5). Next most important is being in familiar surroundings (4.4), followed by two factors rated equally important: family wanting you at home (4.2) and having more privacy and dignity at home (4.2). Least important of all is not liking the idea of dying in hospitals (3.4) Overall – Northern Ireland Choosing to die at home: practical concerns:  Choosing to die at home: practical concerns How important would the following practical obstacles be to you, if you faced the choice of whether to die at home? (N=2542) The biggest practical obstacle people see to dying at home is the constraints of time and physical effort it would put on family and friends (rated on average 4.4 on a 5-point scale). Three obstacles came in joint second place: not having the necessary medical facilities at home (3.9), lack of available nursing care (3.9) and the fear that there would not be anyone who could look after you (3.9). Less important is not having access to a medical professional 24 hours a day (3.7) Overall – Great Britain Again, demographic status made little difference to the overall ranking of these factors. Choosing to die at home: practical concerns:  Choosing to die at home: practical concerns Again, demographic status made little difference to the overall ranking of these factors, although women, older respondents and those in Wales expressed the highest levels of concern overall. Demographic differences in Great Britain Choosing to die at home: practical concerns:  Choosing to die at home: practical concerns How important would the following practical obstacles be to you, if you faced the choice of whether to die at home? (N=287) People in Northern Ireland have very similar practical concerns to Britons. Constraints of time and physical effort are the top concern, with the remaining factors being also given high ratings. Worry about not having access to a medical professional 24 hours a day was a greater concern in Northern Ireland than Britain Overall – Northern Ireland Choosing to die at home: emotional concerns:  Choosing to die at home: emotional concerns How important would the following emotional concerns be to you, if you faced the choice of whether to die at home? (N=2542) Britons were more worried about the emotional impact on family and friends (rated 4.3 on average), than their own pain and symptoms being harder to manage at home (rated 3.9 on average). Overall – Great Britain Choosing to die at home: emotional concerns:  Choosing to die at home: emotional concerns Demographic differences in Great Britain The rank ordering of the two factors did not differ across sex, age or regional groups, although women and older people express generally higher levels of concern. Welsh people were the most concerned about both pain and symptoms (4.1) and impact on friends and family (4.4). Conversely, levels of concern were lowest in North Western England, which scored lowest both on concern about pain and symptoms (3.7) and impact on friends and family (4.1). Choosing to die at home: emotional concerns:  Choosing to die at home: emotional concerns How important would the following emotional concerns be to you, if you faced the choice of whether to die at home? (N=287) Those in Northern Ireland share Britons’ emotional concerns, giving the highest rating to the emotional impact on family and friends (4.3), but also a reasonably high rating to the difficulty of managing pain and symptoms at home (4.0). Overall – Northern Ireland Adopting the carer role:  Adopting the carer role Theoretically, if someone you knew chose to die at home, how likely would you be to support that choice – very unlikely, somewhat unlikely, or very likely? (N=2543) Most British respondents (89%) say that, in theory, they would be likely to support the choice of someone they knew to die at home, including 70% who say they would be “very likely” to be supportive Overall – Great Britain Adopting the carer role:  Adopting the carer role Women (90%) are slightly more likely than men (87%) to say they would theoretically support the choice of a friend/family member to die at home. Respondents over the age of 50 (85%) are less likely than younger respondents to agree. In terms of regions, those from the North West of England (92%) are the most likely to offer theoretical support, whereas those from the West Midlands (81%) are the least likely to do. Demographic differences in Great Britain Adopting the carer role:  Adopting the carer role Theoretically, if someone you knew chose to die at home, how likely would you be to support that choice – very unlikely, somewhat unlikely, or very likely? (N=287) As in Britain, more than 8 in 10 people in Northern Ireland (85%) would support the choice of someone they knew to die at home, in theory. Again, about 7 in 10 (71%) even say they would be “very likely” to support the choice Overall – Northern Ireland Adopting the carer role:  Adopting the carer role Realistically, do you feel you would be capable of supporting a dying friend or relative in a care capacity? (N=2543) However, when asked to say realistically whether they feel capable of supporting a dying friend or relative in a care capacity, only 44% say that they feel capable of such a responsibility. A quarter (25%) do not feel capable, and the remaining third (32%) are unsure Overall – Great Britain Adopting the carer role:  Adopting the carer role Realistically, do you feel you would be capable of supporting a dying friend or relative in a care capacity? (N=2543) There are few demographic differences with respect to theoretically supporting the choice to die at home. However, when it comes to supporting a dying friend or relative in a care capacity, women and older respondents are much more likely to feel that they could realistically offer such support. In realistic terms, respondents from the West Midlands (34%) are least likely to agree that they feel that they are capable of supporting a friend/family member in dying at home. In contrast, half (50%) of the respondents from the South West still maintain that they would feel capable, making them the most likely to do so, out of all ten regions. Demographic differences in Great Britain Adopting the carer role:  Adopting the carer role Realistically, do you feel you would be capable of supporting a dying friend or relative in a care capacity? (N=287) Just as in Britain, theory and reality are quite different in Northern Ireland. Only 43% - the same proportion as in Britain - say that they feel capable of taking on the responsibility for caring for a dying friend or relative. Nearly a quarter (23%) feel they could not do so, and about a third (34%) don’t know Overall – Northern Ireland Adopting the carer role:  Adopting the carer role How important would the following kinds of outside support be to you, if you were supporting in a care capacity a friend or a relative who wanted to die at home? (N=2542) Access to an experienced cancer care nurse was the top priority for Britons in terms of outside support if they found themselves caring for a dying friend or relative. Counselling for themselves was least important Overall – Great Britain Choosing to die at home: reasons for choosing home:  Choosing to die at home: reasons for choosing home Demographic differences in Great Britain Rank orders of the four sources of support were essentially the same across sex, age and regional groups Overall, access to an experienced cancer care nurse (the top priority in all groups) is highest for women (4.7), the over-50s (4.8) and Welsh people (4.8). Adopting the carer role:  Adopting the carer role How important would the following kinds of outside support be to you, if you were supporting in a care capacity a friend or a relative who wanted to die at home? (N=287) Overall – Northern Ireland Access to an experienced cancer care nurse is also the top priority for those in Northern Ireland contemplating caring for a dying friend or relative. Again, counselling is rated least important, although it is rated slightly higher in Northern Ireland than in Britain Social context of the debate:  Social context of the debate Who among the following do you feel should be primarily responsible for paying for the resources to enable terminally ill cancer patients to choose to die at home? Most Britons believe the government should pay to allow terminally ill patients to die at home. About three-quarters (76%) of respondents choose the government as the most appropriate source of funding for the resources needed to allow terminally ill cancer patients to opt to die at home, with only 10% selecting family and friends, and even fewer (4%) choosing charities Overall – Great Britain Social context of the debate:  Social context of the debate Who among the following do you feel should be primarily responsible for paying for the resources to enable terminally ill cancer patients to choose to die at home? Respondents aged 18 to 29 years (7%) are more than twice as likely than respondents aged 30 to 50 years (3%) and those over 50 years (3%) to feel that charities should be responsible. The older the respondent the more likely they are to name the government as primary provider of resources. Demographic differences in Great Britain Social context of the debate:  Social context of the debate Who among the following do you feel should be primarily responsible for paying for the resources to enable terminally ill cancer patients to choose to die at home? (N=287) Even more people in Northern Ireland than in Great Britain believe that the government should be the one to pay to allow terminally ill patients to die at home, with 87% expressing this opinion Overall – Northern Ireland Social context of the debate:  Social context of the debate Do you think death is a taboo subject for the majority of people in the UK? (N=2543) Most respondents (79%) agree death is a taboo subject for the majority of people in Britain Overall – Great Britain Social context of the debate:  Social context of the debate Older age groups are more likely to perceive a taboo (81% of 30-50 year olds and 79% of over-50s) than younger respondents (73% of 18-29 year olds). Respondents from Eastern England (83%) are the most likely to say that death is a taboo subject whilst Welsh respondents (68%) are the least likely to agree. Demographic differences – Great Britain Social context of the debate:  Social context of the debate Do you think death is a taboo subject for the majority of people in the UK? (N=287) Although death is perceived to be a taboo by the majority of people in Northern Ireland (72%), the figure is slightly lower than that in Britain (79%) Overall – Northern Ireland Impact of information on choosing to die at home:  Impact of information on choosing to die at home “Marie Curie Cancer Care provides high quality nursing, totally free, to give terminally ill people the choice of dying at home supported by their families. It currently cares for and supports the choice of 15,000 patients to die at home across the UK every year.” Knowing this, if you were terminally ill, in which of the following places would you most want to die? (N=2543) After learning that Marie Curie provides free nursing support for cancer patients choosing to die at home, the percentage of people selecting home as the place they would choose to die in under those circumstances rose to 72% from the 64% in the question at the start of the survey The biggest shift was among the 561 people (23%) who originally said they would opt for a hospice. Of these, 28% now say they would prefer to die at home. This suggests greater awareness of the option and support available would lead to a significant increase in the number of Britons choosing to die at home. Overall – Great Britain Impact of information on choosing to die at home:  Impact of information on choosing to die at home The impact of the Marie Curie message was much greater upon older age groups than younger age groups. The percentage choosing to die at home rose by only 4% compared to responses at the start of the survey in 18-29 year olds, but rose by 9% for 30-50 year olds and 10% for the over-50s. Shifts from a hospice death toward a home death were largest in Wales, where 36% of those who had originally opted for a hospice at the outset of the survey now chose home. Demographic differences – Great Britain Impact of information on choosing to die at home:  Impact of information on choosing to die at home “Marie Curie Cancer Care provides high quality nursing, totally free, to give terminally ill people the choice of dying at home supported by their families. It currently cares for and supports the choice of 15,000 patients to die at home across the UK every year.” Knowing this, if you were terminally ill, in which of the following places would you most want to die? (N=287) Overall – Northern Ireland In contrast to the British responses, information about Marie Curie’s support offering does not have a dramatic impact on preferences for a home death in Northern Ireland. The percentage of people selecting home as the place they would choose to die if terminally ill rose to 69% from the 65% at the start of the survey, a shift which is within the margin of error for this sample. However, almost a quarter (24%) of those originally expressing preference for a hospital death, and the same percentage (24%) of those originally preferring a hospice death now opted for a home death. Slide51:  Fox Court 14 Gray’s Inn Road London WC1X 8WS U.K. +44 20 7067 0345 700 13th Street NW Washington, DC 20005 +1 202 628 1118 101 Main Street, 8th floor Cambridge, MA 02142 +1 617 661 0024

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