Famous Goddess Paintings

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Information about Famous Goddess Paintings

Published on January 5, 2017

Author: guimera

Source: slideshare.net

1. Famous Goddess Paintings

2. Here are the most divine, potent and powerful women, from Klimt's Pallas Athena and Van Dyck's Fortune to the Botticelli's The Birth of Venus.

3. KLIMT, Gustav Pallas Athena 1898 Oil on canvas, 75 x 75 cm Wien Museum Karlsplatz, Vienna

4. KLIMT, Gustav Pallas Athena (detail) 1898 Oil on canvas, 75 x 75 cm Wien Museum Karlsplatz, Vienna

5. KLIMT, Gustav Pallas Athena (detail) 1898 Oil on canvas, 75 x 75 cm Wien Museum Karlsplatz, Vienna

6. KLIMT, Gustav Pallas Athena (detail) 1898 Oil on canvas, 75 x 75 cm Wien Museum Karlsplatz, Vienna

7. BOTTICELLI, Sandro Pallas and the Centaur c. 1482 Tempera on canvas Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence

8. BOTTICELLI, Sandro Pallas and the Centaur (detail) c. 1482 Tempera on canvas Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence

9. BOTTICELLI, Sandro Pallas and the Centaur (detail) c. 1482 Tempera on canvas Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence

10. BOTTICELLI, Sandro Pallas and the Centaur (detail) c. 1482 Tempera on canvas Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence

11. MASTER of the Fontainebleau School Diana Huntress 1550-60 Oil on canvas, 192 x 133 cm Musée du Louvre, Paris

12. MASTER of the Fontainebleau School Diana Huntress (detail) 1550-60 Oil on canvas, 192 x 133 cm Musée du Louvre, Paris

13. MASTER of the Fontainebleau School Diana Huntress (detail) 1550-60 Oil on canvas, 192 x 133 cm Musée du Louvre, Paris

14. MASTER of the Fontainebleau School Diana Huntress (detail) 1550-60 Oil on canvas, 192 x 133 cm Musée du Louvre, Paris

15. MIGNARD, Pierre The Marquise de Seignelay and Two of her Children 1691 Oil on canvas, 194 x 155 cm National Gallery, London

16. MIGNARD, Pierre The Marquise de Seignelay and Two of her Children (detail) 1691 Oil on canvas, 194 x 155 cm National Gallery, London

17. MIGNARD, Pierre The Marquise de Seignelay and Two of her Children (detail) 1691 Oil on canvas, 194 x 155 cm National Gallery, London

18. MIGNARD, Pierre The Marquise de Seignelay and Two of her Children (detail) 1691 Oil on canvas, 194 x 155 cm National Gallery, London

19. TIZIANO Vecellio Diana and Actaeon 1556-59 Oil on canvas, 185 x 202 cm National Gallery of Scotland, Edinburgh

20. TIZIANO Vecellio Diana and Actaeon (detail) 1556-59 Oil on canvas, 185 x 202 cm National Gallery of Scotland, Edinburgh

21. TIZIANO Vecellio Diana and Actaeon (detail) 1556-59 Oil on canvas, 185 x 202 cm National Gallery of Scotland, Edinburgh

22. TIZIANO Vecellio Diana and Actaeon (detail) 1556-59 Oil on canvas, 185 x 202 cm National Gallery of Scotland, Edinburgh

23. DYCK, Sir Anthony van Rachel de Ruvigny, Countess of Southampton, as Fortune 1640 Oil on canvas, 222.4 × 131.6 cm National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne

24. DYCK, Sir Anthony van Rachel de Ruvigny, Countess of Southampton, as Fortune (detail) 1640 Oil on canvas, 222.4 × 131.6 cm National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne

25. DYCK, Sir Anthony van Rachel de Ruvigny, Countess of Southampton, as Fortune (detail) 1640 Oil on canvas, 222.4 × 131.6 cm National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne

26. STUCK, Franz von The three goddesses Athena, Hera and Aphrodite 1923 Oil on panel, 73.5 × 74 cm Private collection

27. STUCK, Franz von The three goddesses Athena, Hera and Aphrodite (detail) 1923 Oil on panel, 73.5 × 74 cm Private collection

28. STUCK, Franz von The three goddesses Athena, Hera and Aphrodite (detail) 1923 Oil on panel, 73.5 × 74 cm Private collection

29. STUCK, Franz von The three goddesses Athena, Hera and Aphrodite (detail) 1923 Oil on panel, 73.5 × 74 cm Private collection

30. REMBRANDT Harmenszoon van Rijn Bellona 1633 Oil on canvas, 127 x 98 cm Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

31. REMBRANDT Harmenszoon van Rijn Bellona (detail) 1633 Oil on canvas, 127 x 98 cm Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

32. REMBRANDT Harmenszoon van Rijn Bellona (detail) 1633 Oil on canvas, 127 x 98 cm Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

33. REMBRANDT Harmenszoon van Rijn Bellona (detail) 1633 Oil on canvas, 127 x 98 cm Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

34. ROSSETTI, Dante Gabriel Proserpine 1874 Oil on canvas, 125,1 x 61,0 mm Tate Gallery, London

35. ROSSETTI, Dante Gabriel Proserpine (detail) 1874 Oil on canvas, 125,1 x 61,0 mm Tate Gallery, London

36. ROSSETTI, Dante Gabriel Proserpine (detail) 1874 Oil on canvas, 125,1 x 61,0 mm Tate Gallery, London

37. ROSSETTI, Dante Gabriel Proserpine (detail) 1874 Oil on canvas, 125,1 x 61,0 mm Tate Gallery, London

38. BOTTICELLI, Sandro The Birth of Venus c. 1485 Tempera on canvas, 172.5 x 278.5 cm Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence

39. BOTTICELLI, Sandro The Birth of Venus (detail) c. 1485 Tempera on canvas, 172.5 x 278.5 cm Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence

40. BOTTICELLI, Sandro The Birth of Venus (detail) c. 1485 Tempera on canvas, 172.5 x 278.5 cm Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence

41. BOTTICELLI, Sandro The Birth of Venus (detail) c. 1485 Tempera on canvas, 172.5 x 278.5 cm Galleria degli Uffizi, Florence

42. Famous Goddess Paintings images and text credit www. Music wav. created olga.e. thanks for watching oes

43. BOTTICELLI, Sandro The Birth of Venus The Birth of Venus is equally famous work of Sandro Botticelli with Primavera. It simply depicts the moment of the birth of the love-goddess Venus in renaissance era style. In Roman mythology Venus (Aphrodite in Greek mythology) is the goddess of divine love, sex, beauty, seduction and all the persuasive feminine aspects. She symbolizes the intellectual and physical love, attractions. Sometimes she is referred as the heavenly goddess of intellectual love and at many places she is said to be the earthly goddess of physical love or sex. The birth of Venus has a brief history and roots in the story of Uranus’s castration by his own son, Cronus. Uranus (the sky) was a Greek sky deity. He also happened to be the son and also the husband of Gaia, the mother earth. Together they had numerous kids including Twelve Titans, three Cyclopes and many Hekatonchires. Uranus hated the last ones and tried to push them back inside the mother earth’s womb. Enraged by the act, mother earth Gaia and her youngest Hekatonchire son Cronus decided to take revenge. On the same night, when Uranus came at night to Gaia, Cronus attacked on Uranus with a big stone sickle and castrated his genitals. The big brawl went on, but regarding to our painting, the castrated genitals fell into the sea and as a result, born the goddess of love and sex, Venus. There are total of four figures in the painting. The central one standing on a sea-shell is goddess Venus herself. On the left side, the two figures are the god and goddess of wind. Therefore, they are depicted floating in the air and also blowing with their mouth towards Venus suggesting the fact that they have drove Venus to the sea shore. Figure on the right side with a mantle in hands is a nymph ready to receive Venus with the cloth to cover her naked body.

44. KLIMT, Gustav Pallas Athena The ancient Greek goddess of wisdom glares powerfully out of Klimt's visionary fin de siecle masterpiece that mingles ancient mythology and modern psychology. In Klimt's Vienna, artists, writers and not least the doctor of dreams Sigmund Freud were fascinated by the power of the unconscious and the magnetism of sexuality. Athena here is not so much a divinity of reason as a primitive archetype of female authority and strength.

45. BOTTICELLI, Sandro Pallas and the Centaur In this uncannily real painting that gives supernatural beings an incredibly solid presence as if observed from nature – note the convincing join between the human and horse halves of the centaur: how did Botticelli work out this anatomical illusion? – the Greek goddess of wisdom grabs a male embodiment of unreason by its tangled hair. She disciplines the wild, unstable, hyper-masculine centaur in a vision of women saving the world from male madness.

46. MASTER of the Fontainebleau School Diana Huntress This painting of Diana, the virgin goddess of the hunt in Greco-Roman mythology, is also an allegorical image of Diane de Poitiers, mistress of the French king and a power to be reckoned with in 16th-century France. When she became Henri II's lover, she was 34 and he was 16. She held sway over him all his life. Artists of the French court at Fontainebleau helped create a cult of her as the goddess Diana, wise and innocent but dangerous to those who cross her.

47. MIGNARD, Pierre The Marquise de Seignelay and Two of her Children In this rollicking allegorical portrait the Marquise of Seignelay, one of the richest widows in 17th-century France, poses as the aquatic divinity Thetis from ancient Greek myth. In Homer's Iliad, the son of Thetis is the hero Achilles, and one of the Marquise's sons is dressed as a young Achilles. The corals and shells that decorate the painting symbolise the marine supernatural powers to which the Marquise de Seignelay lays claim in this grand classical boast.

48. TIZIANO Vecellio Diana and Actaeon In Ovid's Metamorphoses, young Actaeon is out hunting one day when he chances on a grove where the goddess Diana is bathing. She punishes him for seeing her naked by turning him into a stag – and he is torn to pieces by his own hounds. Titian depicts the fatal exchange of looks when he sees her, and she him. In this moment of revelation, everything has a heightened beauty – not just the flesh of the very real women who pose as Diana and her nymphs but water dancing from a fountain, the glimpsed sky and the trees all ravish the eye. For this beautiful moment, the goddess is about to exact a terrible price.

49. STUCK, Franz von The three goddesses Athena, Hera and Aphrodite It is recounted that Zeus held a banquet in celebration of the marriage of Peleus and Thetis (parents of Achilles). However, Eris, goddess of discord was not invited, for it was believed she would have made the party unpleasant for everyone. Angered by this snub, Eris arrived at the celebration with a golden apple from the Garden of the Hesperides, which she threw into the proceedings as a prize of beauty. Three goddesses claimed the apple: Hera, Athena and Aphrodite. They asked Zeus to judge which of them was fairest, and eventually he, reluctant to favor any claim himself, declared that Paris, a Trojan mortal, would judge their cases, for he had recently shown his exemplary fairness in a contest in which Ares in bull form had bested Paris's own prize bull, and the shepherd-prince had unhesitatingly awarded the prize to the god. Thus it happened that, with Hermes as their guide, the three candidates bathed in the spring of Ida, then confronted Paris on Mount Ida in the climactic moment that is the crux of the tale. After failing to judge their beauty with their clothing on, the three goddesses stripped nude to convince Paris of their worthiness. While Paris inspected them, each attempted with her powers to bribe him; Hera offered to make him king of Europe and Asia, Athena offered wisdom and skill in war, and Aphrodite, who had the Charites and the Horai to enhance her charms with flowers and song, offered the world's most beautiful woman. This was Helen of Sparta, wife of the Greek king Menelaus. Paris accepted Aphrodite's gift and awarded the apple to her, receiving Helen as well as the enmity of the Greeks and especially of Hera. The Greeks' expedition to retrieve Helen from Paris in Troy is the mythological basis of the Trojan War.

50. DYCK, Sir Anthony van Rachel de Ruvigny, Countess of Southampton, as Fortune The goddess Fortune survived from antiquity through the middle ages because she symbolised so vividly the ups and downs of business and wealth. Rachel de Ruvigny has become this lucky goddess. As Van Dyck makes all too clear in his cosmic shimmer of silver and sapphire, she is fortunate indeed, a woman of wealth and taste and, through the blessing of art, a divine power in her own lifetime.

51. REMBRANDT Harmenszoon van Rijn Bellona Bellona was a Roman goddess of war but Rembrandt portrays her as human, all too human. She looks rustic and unmartial inside her glistening armour, ill-suited to this metal garb of war – but ready to defend her country nonetheless. Like Rembrandt's painting The Night Watch with its Dutch Dad's Army gathering, this down-to-earth portrait of a war goddess suggests that humble and unaristocratic as the Dutch are, they will defend their world of everyday decencies with stubborn heroism.

52. ROSSETTI, Dante Gabriel Proserpine In the classical myth Proserpine was kidnapped by Pluto, the god of the underworld, to be his wife. She begged to be returned to earth, but because she had eaten some pomegranate seeds Pluto confined her to his kingdom for half of each year. She is shown here eating a pomegranate which symbolises captivity. Jane Morris modelled for Proserpine. She was married to Dante Gabriel Rossetti's friend William Morris and was also Rossetti's lover. She was unhappy in her marriage and Rossetti may also have seen her as a captive goddess.

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