Facilitation Sucess

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Information about Facilitation Sucess

Published on June 4, 2009

Author: christina48221

Source: slideshare.net

Description

PowerPoint on what is facilitation and the keys for using it for success.

Facilitating Team Success

What is Facilitation? Bostrom, Anson, and Clawson define facilitation as “activities carried out before, during, and after meetings to help a group achieve its own outcomes.” Examples: Pre-Meeting: Gathering all necessary paperwork In-Meeting: Giving each other equal speaking time After Meeting: Sending out email reports so everyone remains updated on what is going on.

Bostrom, Anson, and Clawson define facilitation as “activities carried out before, during, and after meetings to help a group achieve its own outcomes.”

Examples:

Pre-Meeting: Gathering all necessary paperwork

In-Meeting: Giving each other equal speaking time

After Meeting: Sending out email reports so everyone remains updated on what is going on.

Two Types of Facilitation There are two types of facilitation. Process Facilitation- the provision of procedural structure and general support to groups through the meeting process. Content Facilitation- involves intervention that relate directly to the problem being discussed.

There are two types of facilitation.

Process Facilitation- the provision of procedural structure and general support to groups through the meeting process.

Content Facilitation- involves intervention that relate directly to the problem being discussed.

The Importance of Facilitation Facilitation is important because: It helps keep a team on track It helps resolve conflicts It increases a team’s effectiveness.

Facilitation is important because:

It helps keep a team on track

It helps resolve conflicts

It increases a team’s effectiveness.

The Role of the Facilitator A facilitator formally or informally takes on the role of monitoring a team’s process for effectiveness. The facilitator focuses more on how a team is working than on what the team is doing. Responsibilities of a facilitator vary from team to team, depending on the goals, technical requirements, duration and employee makeup of that team. They work outside meetings to further group cohesion or help gain support from key groups or individuals external to the team. Facilitators model and educate team members in the use of facilitative skills. This helps make the team self-reliant instead of relying on the facilitator.

A facilitator formally or informally takes on the role of monitoring a team’s process for effectiveness. The facilitator focuses more on how a team is working than on what the team is doing.

Responsibilities of a facilitator vary from team to team, depending on the goals, technical requirements, duration and employee makeup of that team.

They work outside meetings to further group cohesion or help gain support from key groups or individuals external to the team.

Facilitators model and educate team members in the use of facilitative skills. This helps make the team self-reliant instead of relying on the facilitator.

Facilitation Skills and Behaviors Task-Related Behaviors focus on the content of the meeting Maintenance-related behaviors relate to the process of how the group works together. Dysfunctional Behaviors are actions taken by members that may hinder or even undermine the team’s progress.

Task-Related Behaviors focus on the content of the meeting

Maintenance-related behaviors relate to the process of how the group works together.

Dysfunctional Behaviors are actions taken by members that may hinder or even undermine the team’s progress.

Examples Related to Each Behavior Task-Related Behaviors: Initiating Giving/Seeking Information Clarifying and elaborating Summarizing Consensus Testing

Task-Related Behaviors:

Initiating

Giving/Seeking Information

Clarifying and elaborating

Summarizing

Consensus Testing

Examples Related to Each Behavior Maintenance-Related Behaviors: Harmonizing and Compromising Gatekeeping Diagnosing Standard Setting

Maintenance-Related Behaviors:

Harmonizing and Compromising

Gatekeeping

Diagnosing

Standard Setting

Examples Related to Each Behavior Dysfunctional Behaviors: Blocking Dominating Withdrawing Self-Seeking

Dysfunctional Behaviors:

Blocking

Dominating

Withdrawing

Self-Seeking

Key Facilitation Strategies Establish ground Rules Get Agreement on Process Get Agreement on Content/Outcome Be Positive (win-win attitude) Build an Agenda Get permission to enforce the process agreements Get the group to take responsibility for its actions

Establish ground Rules

Get Agreement on Process

Get Agreement on Content/Outcome

Be Positive (win-win attitude)

Build an Agenda

Get permission to enforce the process agreements

Get the group to take responsibility for its actions

Key Facilitative Interventions General Approach Boomerang Maintain/Regain Focus Play Dumb Say What’s Going On Check For Agreement Accept/Legitimize/Deal With, or Defer Don’t be Defensive Use Justifying Questions Use Leading Questions Use the Group Memory Don’t Talk Too Much Use Hypothetical Questions Use a Reality Check Use a Time-Out Call a Team Member’s Bluff

General Approach

Boomerang

Maintain/Regain Focus

Play Dumb

Say What’s Going On

Check For Agreement

Accept/Legitimize/Deal With, or Defer

Don’t be Defensive

Use Justifying Questions

Use Leading Questions

Use the Group Memory

Don’t Talk Too Much

Use Hypothetical Questions

Use a Reality Check

Use a Time-Out

Call a Team Member’s Bluff

Facilitation Tips Be receptive to feedback and coiling to change your thoughts, opinions and behaviors Share your observations. Wait and see if the team can resolve their own conflict. Focus primarily on the process or how the team goes about achieving its goals. As teams develop move toward being more nondirective using questioning and reflecting behaviors to help the team help itself.

Be receptive to feedback and coiling to change your thoughts, opinions and behaviors

Share your observations.

Wait and see if the team can resolve their own conflict.

Focus primarily on the process or how the team goes about achieving its goals.

As teams develop move toward being more nondirective using questioning and reflecting behaviors to help the team help itself.

Identifying and Dealing With Problem People Some people with or without ill intent can single-handedly hinder even the best teams. These people are called PROBLEM PEOPLE. When you come across a Problem Person you have to decide: How would you deal with this individual? What preventive techniques might you use? What interventions might you use?

Some people with or without ill intent can single-handedly hinder even the best teams. These people are called PROBLEM PEOPLE.

When you come across a Problem Person you have to decide:

How would you deal with this individual?

What preventive techniques might you use?

What interventions might you use?

Some Barriers to Facilitation Not all organizations or team use or recognize the value of facilitators Objectivity: the ability to view a situation without personal bias Shared perspective for effective work Some problems still exist Facilitator who is seen as ineffective or incredible

Not all organizations or team use or recognize the value of facilitators

Objectivity: the ability to view a situation without personal bias

Shared perspective for effective work

Some problems still exist

Facilitator who is seen as ineffective or incredible

Conclusion Facilitation is helping a group to accomplish its goals. The practice usually is best carried out by someone who has strong knowledge and skills. Effective facilitation might also involve strong knowledge and skills about the particular topic. Facilitation is a skill that can increase the effectiveness of all its members and organizations.

Facilitation is helping a group to accomplish its goals. The practice usually is best carried out by someone who has strong knowledge and skills. Effective facilitation might also involve strong knowledge and skills about the particular topic. Facilitation is a skill that can increase the effectiveness of all its members and organizations.

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