Eukaryotes

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Information about Eukaryotes

Published on April 3, 2008

Author: sth215

Source: slideshare.net

Description

Intro to eukaryotic cells and their organelles

Eukaryotic Cells A cell with a brain

Catalyst Draw and label the three shapes of prokaryotic cells. Draw and label examples of the two things prokaryotic cells use to move around. What is the biggest difference between eukaryotic cells and prokaryotic cells? 4. What are the three laws of Cell Theory? (These are the laws scientists think are true about cells)

Draw and label the three shapes of prokaryotic cells.

Draw and label examples of the two things prokaryotic cells use to move around.

What is the biggest difference between eukaryotic cells and prokaryotic cells?

4. What are the three laws of Cell Theory? (These are the laws scientists think are true about cells)

Catalyst Answers Draw and label the three shapes of prokaryotic cells. Round Oval Spiral

Draw and label the three shapes of prokaryotic cells.

Round

Oval

Spiral

Catalyst Answers Draw and label examples of the two things prokaryotic cells use to move around. Flagella Cilia

Draw and label examples of the two things prokaryotic cells use to move around.

Flagella

Cilia

Catalyst Answers 3. Prokaryotic cells do not have a nucleus and eukaryotic cells have a nucleus.

3. Prokaryotic cells do not have a nucleus and eukaryotic cells have a nucleus.

Catalyst Answers 4. The three laws of Cell Theory are…. A. All living things are made of cells. B. Cells are the basic units of structure and function in all living things. In other words, cells are like the building blocks of all living things. C. New cells are only made from existing cells.

4. The three laws of Cell Theory are….

A. All living things are made of cells.

B. Cells are the basic units of structure and function in all living things. In other words, cells are like the building blocks of all living things.

C. New cells are only made from existing cells.

Let’s review what we already know about eukaryotic cells….

Let’s review what we already know about eukaryotic cells….

Eukaryote Cell A more complex cell with a nucleus and many organelles.

A more complex cell with a nucleus and many organelles.

Traits of Eukaryotes: (you-care-ee-othts) 1. They all have a nucleus where the genetic material of the cell is stored. 2. They have many organelles that work together to help the cell function.

1. They all have a nucleus where the genetic material of the cell is stored.

2. They have many organelles that work together to help the cell function.

More traits of Eukaryotes: (you-care-ee-othts) 3. Eukaryotic cells are much more complex then prokaryotic cells. They can be just one cell or can make up more complex multi-cellular organisms. 5. All plants, animals, fungi, and protists are eukaryotic cells.

3. Eukaryotic cells are much more complex then prokaryotic cells.

They can be just one cell or can make up more complex multi-cellular organisms.

5. All plants, animals, fungi, and protists are eukaryotic cells.

There are two types of eukaryotic cells: Animal Cells Plants Cells

Animal Cells

Plants Cells

Plant and Animal Cells Write down the similarities and differences you observe!

Things to remember about organelles….

Things to remember about organelles….

The purpose of an organelle is to _____________ the cell _________________. You fill this out on your own!

The purpose of an organelle is to _____________ the cell _________________.

You fill this out on your own!

2. Eukaryotic cells have a lot of organelles that work together to help the cell function.

2. Eukaryotic cells have a lot of organelles that work together to help the cell function.

3. Each organelle has its own specific job that it has to do for the cell. Its only with all the organelles working together that the cell can function.

3. Each organelle has its own specific job that it has to do for the cell. Its only with all the organelles working together that the cell can function.

4. Animal and plant cells have a lot of organelles in common, but they also have some that are different.

4. Animal and plant cells have a lot of organelles in common, but they also have some that are different.

Did you know…. Scientists have a theory that way back in the day some organelles used to be totally separate prokaryotic cells that had a symbiotic relationship with ancient eukaryotes. (Symbiotic means they both lived together and helped each other out) Then, because the prokaryotes and the eukaryote partners had such a great relationship with each other the prokaryotes just decided to move in and they’ve been living together ever since!

Scientists have a theory that way back in the day some organelles used to be totally separate prokaryotic cells that had a symbiotic relationship with ancient eukaryotes. (Symbiotic means they both lived together and helped each other out)

Then, because the prokaryotes and the eukaryote partners had such a great relationship with each other the prokaryotes just decided to move in and they’ve been living together ever since!

Ok, let’s look more closely at these organelles....

Ok, let’s look more closely at these organelles....

Nucleus - The Brain *The nucleus tells the cell what to do and hold the genetic material.

*The nucleus tells the cell what to do and hold the genetic material.

Cell Membrane – The Ticket Checker *The cell membrane covers the cell and decides what goes in and out of the cell.* Just like the guy that checks your ticket at the movies - if you don’t have a ticket, you can’t come in!

*The cell membrane covers the cell and decides what goes in and out of the cell.*

Just like the guy that checks your ticket at the movies - if you don’t have a ticket, you can’t come in!

Cell Wall – The Walls *In a plant cell, the cell wall supports and protects the cell. Cell walls are rigid and unbending. They help a plant cell support itself. An animal cell does not have a cell wall.

*In a plant cell, the cell wall supports and protects the cell.

Cell walls are rigid and unbending. They help a plant cell support itself. An animal cell does not have a cell wall.

Cytoplasm – The Jelly in the center The cytoplasm in the cell is jelly-like liquid that fills all the empty space in a cell.

The cytoplasm in the cell is jelly-like liquid that fills all the empty space in a cell.

Chloroplasts – Solar Power for Plants Chloroplasts make food from the sunlight for plant cells. This is called photosynthesis . Chloroplasts are what make plants green!

Chloroplasts make food from the sunlight for plant cells. This is called photosynthesis .

Chloroplasts are what make plants green!

Mitochondria – The Cell’s Power House The mitochondria takes food and makes it into energy for the cell.

The mitochondria takes food and makes it into energy for the cell.

Vacuole – The Locker The vacuoles are the cell’s storage place where it keeps water, food and waste.

The vacuoles are the cell’s storage

place where it keeps water, food and waste.

Lysosome – The Clean Up Crew The lysosome digests, or gets rid of the cell’s waste. (animal cells only)

The lysosome digests, or gets

rid of the cell’s waste. (animal cells only)

Ribosome – Little Protein Factories Like little factories, ribosomes make proteins the cell needs to function.

Like little factories, ribosomes make proteins the cell needs to function.

Golgi Body – The Post Office The Golgi Body packages and move the proteins from the ribosomes.

The Golgi Body packages and move the proteins from the ribosomes.

Genetic Material (DNA) – A Cell’s Blueprint The genetic material (DNA) is stored in the nucleus and holds information a cell needs to reproduce itself.

The genetic material (DNA) is stored in the nucleus and holds information a cell needs to reproduce itself.

Think – Pair - Share Think about the function or job of each organelle and then turn to your partner and share.

Think about the function or job of each organelle and then turn to your partner and share.

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