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English_Learners_-_Revisit_Your_Data_and

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Published on December 29, 2008

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English Learners: Revisit Your Data and Discover Some Hidden Truths : English Learners: Revisit Your Data and Discover Some Hidden Truths Tony Wold, Ed.D. – Director, Quality Education (QEIA) Anthony.wold@sausd.us A Presentation for Santa Ana Unified School District School Site Administration Wexford Institute LA County Study : Wexford Institute LA County Study Study of the Scores of English Learners in Six LA County School Districts to Determine the Relationship Between their CELDT and CST Scores Spring 2002 – CST in ELA Fall 2002 – CELDT (Overall Scale Score & Reading Scale Score) Is there a positive correlation between a student’s score on CELDT Reading and his/her score on CST English Language Arts? For students who score at the Early Advanced or Advanced proficiency level on the CELDT, and also score at the Basic level on the CST English Language Arts test, what percentage of these students score at the lower third of the Basic level, the middle third and the top third? Limitations of the Study : Limitations of the Study Data from only six districts, with predominately Spanish-language populations More than half of the student scores came from one of the districts and there are only 13,156 students in the total sample grades 3-11 Instructional programs for English learners varied from district to district Different types of scores are being compared This is a one-time comparison of scores, not a longitudinal study Summary of Significant Findings : Summary of Significant Findings For students who scored at the Early Advanced or Advanced proficiency level on the Overall CELDT test, and also scored at the Basic level on the CST English Language Arts test A majority of EL Students at all grade levels scored at the Far Below Basic and Below Basic levels on the CST. At grades 9,10, 11 all EL students scored at the Far Below Basic or Below Basic levels. Grade 3 has almost 70% of students clustered at the middle and end of Basic. Grades 3, 4, and 5 scores are somewhat evenly dispersed among the beginning, middle and end of Basic. For grades 4, 5, 6, and 7, 70% or more of EL students are clustered in the first and second thirds of the Basic Level. Over 50% of students in grades 8-11 are at the beginning of Basic. Grade 10 students are largely clustered at the beginning of Basic. CST Scale Score Clusters at Each Grade Level : CST Scale Score Clusters at Each Grade Level CST Scale Score Clusters at Each Grade Level : CST Scale Score Clusters at Each Grade Level Hidden Truths Found in English Learner Data Require Some New Thinking About Academic Language Proficiency : Hidden Truths Found in English Learner Data Require Some New Thinking About Academic Language Proficiency No Child Left Behind requires all subgroups to meet the same proficiency goals. This simple concept becomes complicated when analyzing the data to determine which students are in each subgroup. There are some surprises… English Language Proficiency AMAOs : AMAO 1 Annual increases in the percentage of children making progress in learning English AMAO 2 Annual increases in the percentage of children attaining English proficiency English Language Proficiency AMAOs Hidden Truths found in English Learner Data Adequate Yearly Progress : Adequate Yearly Progress The rules are different in accountability. AYP goals require a participation rate of 95% tested; AND 35.2% Proficiency in ELA (elementary target) This is school wide AND for each individual subgroup AND 37.0% Proficiency in Math This is school wide AND for each individual subgroup AND 83.1% Graduation rate AND 650 API score for SED A Total of 38 goals must be met to make AYP. Missing any one goal results in not making AYP Nothing less than perfection will meet NCLB goals School enter Program Improvement for failing to meet goals two consecutive years in the same content area. Schools exit Program Improvement only by making all goals for two consecutive years in ALL content areas. A school that makes it one year, then misses the next advances to the next level in Program Improvement (with the first year basically only freezing the status of the site) 2006 – 07 Goals AYP Goals for 2007 - 08 : AYP Goals for 2007 - 08 Nothing like a moving target Standards-based Instruction : Standards-based Instruction Climbing Every Mountain Slide 13: Student Proficiency is measured by their place on the “mountain” California Standards Test Performance Levels Each Year the Student’s Climb a New Mountain – the standards clock keeps ticking : Each Year the Student’s Climb a New Mountain – the standards clock keeps ticking The Target mountain is always higher than the previous mountain 3rd grade 4th grade Proficiency Student’s Climb at different rates : Student’s Climb at different rates In any given classroom, the students are at different levels on the mountain Some students are even on completely different mountains The instructional strategies utilized by teachers and staff can help illuminate the route for a student to take on their climb. NCLB requires 100% proficiency by the year 2013 – 2014! Slide 16: Another Mountain Mastering ELD Standards Multiple Measure assessments put in place in both Divisions. Assessments and Evaluation protocols developed by a committee of practitioners & experts in ELD Designed to assist teachers in moving ELs toward fluency in English Delineates proficiency levels required to move through the levels of ELD Integrates listening, speaking, reading and writing Instructional level is calculating using Weighted ELD measures in Elementary English Learners and Baseball : English Learners and Baseball Major Leagues “The Show” (rFEP) Rookie League (<12 months) Class A (Levels 1 & 2) Class AA (Levels 3 & 4) Class AAA (Level 4&5 SDAIE) English Learner The road to Academic Language Proficiency English Learners in Accountability : English Learners in Accountability Class A (ELD) Class AA Class AAA - SDAIE The player is just beginning to learn the game. Significant areas of growth in their game are required. If brought to the show they would ultimately fail and become discouraged Every player at this level has the potential to reach the majors. There are still areas that need improvement If brought to the show they might have initial success, but the learning curve would soon catch up to them These players often must contribute to the major league team when it is in need. The players need to be coached and monitored to ensure that they continue to progress Most feel they should be in the show and therefore motivation and strategies are critical Slide 19: Character is like a tree and reputation its shadow. The shadow is what we think it is; the tree is the real thing. Abraham Lincoln NCLB LEP Subgroup – rFEP students not meeting proficiency expectations are the real thing in student performance and part of the hidden truths found in the English learner subgroup Students who have attained redesignated status should be able to meet academic proficiency standards – these students are the key to support sites in meeting goals for the English learner subgroup Many of these students are in our regular programs (in the shadow) in respect to accountability. Students are in Multiple Subgroups : Students are in Multiple Subgroups English Learner Socioeconomic disadvantaged Ethnicities Student A Don’t forget that just because students with disabilities is not a significant subgroup (100 students or 15% of the school these students DO count in each of the other subgroups and should be included in all site interventions English learner focused instructional strategies supporting rFEP students occur in the regular classroom setting. These strategies will also support IFEP and EO students in those settings. Many of those students are in the other subgroups, which will help move toward the goal of 30+% English Learner subgroup : English Learner subgroup The English learner subgroup is comprised of students learning English who have been enrolled for one school year AND – Redesignated Fluent English Proficient (rFEP) students who have not been proficient on the California Standards Test in ELA 3 times (not consecutive) It is critical that the performance of rFEP students be monitored as they can facilitate gains in this total subgroup Meeting AYP for NCLB LEP : Meeting AYP for NCLB LEP EL > 12 months rFEP not Prof 3 times NCLB LEP AYP Goal 24.4% # at site 150 # at site + 70 Total Cohort = 220 54 students in the cohort must reach proficiency OR 77.14% of the rFEP students (54 of 70) The English learner subgroup is comprised of students learning English who have been enrolled for one school year AND – Redesignated Fluent English Proficient (rFEP) students who have not been proficient on the California Standards Test in ELA 3 times (not consecutive) 2004 – 05 rFEP CST Scores : 2004 – 05 rFEP CST Scores Toss a flag on this performance ---- 48.8 % of the rFEP students, who had not been proficient 3 times previously on the CST ELA, did NOT score at the proficient level in 2004 – 2005. Slide 26:  K PK 3 2 4 1 5 6 7 Academic Content Standards SDAIE / Sheltered English Instruction English Language Development – ELD 8 Students – Teachers – Program Alternatives English Learner-centered Pedagogy English Language Arts Standards Slide 27: ELA English Language Arts – ELA Standards P R I M A R Y L A N G U A G E English Language Development - ELD English Learner-centered Pedagogy SDAIE – Sheltered English – Academic Content Standards K PK 3 2 4 1 5 6 7 English Language Development – ELD Academic Content Standards SDAIE Sheltered English Instruction English Language Arts Standards Students – Teachers – Program Alternatives English Learner-centered Pedagogy INSTRUCTIONAL CYCLE Standards Assessment Instruction Instructional Sequence Data Analysis Three Competencies: 1. Oral English Fluency 2. English Language Arts Standards 3. Academic Content Standards INSTRUCTIONAL CYCLE INSTRUCTIONAL CYCLE INSTRUCTIONAL CYCLE INSTRUCTIONAL CYCLE INSTRUCTIONAL CYCLE CAHSEE Passing ? Proficient : 300 350 380 CAHSEE Passing ? Proficient Average NCLB LEP scaled score was 348 Average EL scaled score was 326! PASSING PROFICIENT 92 % of rFEP & 16% of all EL Passed The 10th grade results uncover this critical set of facts! This is a first-time score as 10th graders! Students have at least 5 more opportunities to pass This is a one-shot deal. Students have multiple attempts to pass, but only ONE attempt to be proficient that counts for AYP EO avg. 378 Gap Analysis : Gap Analysis Putting together the pieces of the data puzzle… CAHSEE English learners & rFEP CST – Proficiency & Clusters Benchmarks Power Standards within Standards-based instruction Word Analysis and Vocabulary : Word Analysis and Vocabulary Word Analysis is assessed as the student’s ability to decode known and unknown words and phrases, from a cold-read in which the student has no prior knowledge. This is different than traditional vocabulary exercises and often uses terms that have multiple meanings that must have meaning discerned from the context in which the word appears in the passage. Writing Strategies & Reading Comprehension : Writing Strategies & Reading Comprehension Writing Strategies, and to some extent Reading Comprehension, are assessed based upon the student’s ability to edit and improve upon material that is already correct is a major portion of the Writing Strategies cluster. This is different than just editing for grammatical errors and general understanding of written material. Write from the beginning gains demonstrate our improvement, but the Writing Strategies and Reading Comprehension strands still stand out… Discriminator Analysis : Discriminator Analysis Why did the students answer the way they did? How can we unlock the student’s thinking? Just because the discriminator was a “good” or plausible answer does not mean it was the “correct” answer. Slide 34: “If you don’t know where you are going, you’ll end up somewhere else.” Yogi Berra So….How do we develop a vision for using data to improve the instructional program and give everyone time to teach???? Back to Bloom : Back to Bloom 50 – 95 % of questions addressed to students in regular classroom instruction 40 – 70% of the questions on the CST tests are written at Application level, or higher Question: Why are the achievements gaps still the same as last year? The Standards are often not assessed as written… : 5th grade Word Analysis Standards 5th grade History Standards The Standards are often not assessed as written… Question: When did Columbus sail the Ocean Blue? “The Googlization of Education” : “The Googlization of Education” If you can find the answer in the first 8 links from a Google search it is likely a low-level question on Bloom’s taxonomy… How do we get students to the 380 score and 30% Proficient? Why did Columbus sail? : Click 3rd link Why did Columbus sail? Question: What if Columbus had been right? How would the economic, political, and educational focus have changed in Spain and Europe? Why Inquiry? : Why Inquiry? Immediately engages students with their own thinking process ~60% of questions on CST tests are written at Level 2 & 3 50-95% of questions addressed to students in class are at Level 1 Let’s examine this question together, my friend, and if you can contradict anything that I say, do so, and I shall be persuaded. Crito, Plato Costas Levels of Inquiry : Costas Levels of Inquiry Level 1 Basic Input / Gathering Information Complete, Count, Match, Name, Define, Observe, Describe, Identify, List, Select, Recite, Scan Level 2 Processing Information Compare/Contrast, Sort, Distinguish, Explain, Why, Infer, Sequence, Analyze, Synthesize, Make Analogy Level 3 Creating Your Own Ideas Evaluate, Generalize, Imagine, Judge, Predict, If/Then, Speculate, Hypothesize, Forecast, Idealize, Apply the Principle Random Acts of Rigor : Random Acts of Rigor Rigor can be added periodically Rigor does not have to appear every lesson Using review strategies you can spiral rigor Rigor NOT Rigor mortis… Lest We Forget…The Forgetting Curve : Lest We Forget…The Forgetting Curve The Power of the Summary : The Power of the Summary Summary is added at the end of all note pages on the subject (not at the end of each page), Summary is added AFTER questions are finished. Summary can be collaborative and a work in progress. Summary can tie learning together. Reminders for Summarizing : Reminders for Summarizing To effectively summarize, students must delete some information, substitute some information, and keep some information. To effectively delete, substitute, and keep information, students must analyze the information at a fairly deep level. Being aware of the explicit structure of information is an aid to summarizing information. Require students to distill information into a parsimonious, synthesized form. Slide 45: Chapter 10: Rethinking English Language Instruction: An Architectural Approach Susana Dutro and Carrol Moran Forms - grammatical structures and word usage Functions – purposes and uses of language in formal and informal settings Vocabulary development- includes the teaching and practicing of both BRICK and MORTAR words Fluency – ease of comprehension (listening and reading) and production (speaking and writing) Slide 46: Front-loading ELD – in addition to SDAIE strategies Purpose Ensure access to content instruction taught in English by preteaching for upcoming language demands Content Determined by language purposes. Teaches sentence structures and vocabulary needed to engage in content skills or concepts Maximizing the Teachable Moment Purpose 1) Help ensure access throughout the day and 2) Utilize odd moments for expanding and deepening language skills Content 1) Unanticipated language needs as they arise 2) Developing language skills. Dutro & Moran, 2003 Slide 47: Academic Language for English Language Learners Cognitive Processes Interpreting Analyzing Synthesizing Hypothesizing Drawing conclusions Persuading Developing arguments Academic Language Language structures Sentence complexity Academic vocabulary Language nuances Discourse style Narrative style Proficiency Practice in varied contexts: - across domains - across curriculum Ease in comprehending & producing language C A L P Dutro & Moran, 2003 Gil G. Garcia, Ph.D. Top Ten List of English Learner-centered Teaching Strategies : Gil G. Garcia, Ph.D. Top Ten List of English Learner-centered Teaching Strategies Assessment Oral language development Reader’s theatre Read alouds Background building Graphic organizers Classroom libraries Writing instruction Vocabulary Data analysis Top Ten Strategies - #1 : Top Ten Strategies - #1 Assessment We need to assess primary language Bring to the front of the instructional cycle, and utilize in lesson planning (backward mapping) Oral retell Multiple measures Analyze student products Strengths/Weaknesses/ – What next? Data analysis Top Ten Strategies - #2 : Top Ten Strategies - #2 Oral language development Biliteracy initiatives ELD – 30 to 40 minutes a day Songs - Poetry - Chants Storytelling (Grandfather’s Journey) Provide a time to talk (District 6 experience) Think/pair/share, collaborative rehearsals for oral fluency – including academic oral fluency Oral language in published programs Making Meaning/Let’s Talk About It Top Ten Strategies - #3 : Top Ten Strategies - #3 Reader’s Theatre Motivating Reading performance Reading rehearsal Repeated readings Reading fluency practice Expression “stress/pitch/juncture” Top Ten Strategies - #4 : Top Ten Strategies - #4 Read Alouds Built into core Frontload the language structures Modeling Vocabulary – less frequent / academic /idioms / multiple meaning / cognates Comprehension at a listening level Application of comprehension strategies Making Meaning – Developmental Studies Center Top Ten Strategies - #5 : Top Ten Strategies - #5 Background building #1 influence on comprehension Background matters Frontloading for language structures / Dutro Technology Top Ten Strategies - #6 : Top Ten Strategies - #6 Graphic Organizers Visual thinking / lines represent language Way to visualize a thought process Common visual language Thinking Maps Academic Content Standards English Language Arts Standards academic language proficiency (three competencies) Oral English Fluency Top Ten Strategies - #7 : Top Ten Strategies - #7 Classroom libraries Guided reading/leveled readers Shared reading Self-selected reading Home reading connection Expository text Top Ten Strategies - #8 : Top Ten Strategies - #8 Writing Weakest of all literacy areas Forms/functions of language Student products/analysis Functional grammar/verbs & prepositional phrases – mortar words Discrete language skills Spelling/four developmental stages Words Their Way Top Ten Strategies - #9 : Top Ten Strategies - #9 Vocabulary Academic language/ content Glad strategies/charts-pictures Morphemes/meaningful parts Comprehension Slide 58: Building Academic Vocabulary Robert J. Marzano & Debra J. Pickering Provide a description, explanation, or example of the new term (use native language/pairs or triads/non linguistic representation-pictures) Ask students to restate the description, explanation, or example in their own words (native language/familiar English words) Ask students to construct a picture, symbol, or graphic representing the term (important for students own representation) Engage students periodically in activities that help them add to their knowledge of the terms in their notebooks (native language) Periodically ask students to discuss the terms with one another (triads, paraprofessionals, or parent volunteers) Involve students periodically in games that allow them to play with terms (triads, paraprofessionals, or parent volunteers)

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