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Edward Clement Mametz Wood

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Information about Edward Clement Mametz Wood
Education

Published on January 10, 2008

Author: Dario

Source: authorstream.com

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Slide1:  By Des Quinn and Martin Williams To stop the presentation press ‘esc’ at any time. Slide2:  German soldiers WWI Period German Field Guns 1916 Initial Stimulus Material Lesson Materials Information, Questions and Tasks For Teachers General Introduction Slide3:  What does the photograph show? What does this indicate about German preparation for ‘wood warfare’? Image courtesy of M. Williams Slide4:  Images courtesy of M. Williams German Field Guns - 1916. A patrol from the 7th Division had entered Mametz Wood, killed a party of German soldiers and taken the breech blocks out of two German field guns on the 3rd of July. Slide5:  The accompanying Word Document gives details of the Battle of Mametz Wood and should help teachers to put together a series of lessons based upon the events of 7th - 12th July. These PowerPoint slides are therefore aimed at supplementing this information, while providing the link between the battle and the fate of Edward Clement. It may be a good idea for pupils to visit the Commonwealth War Graves Commission website towards the end of this study (Slide 18). Alternatively teachers could present this to the class using an internet connection and projector. Here pupils can find out where Edward Clement was finally buried and the day on which he died. The following information was mainly gathered from a number of sources, but primarily from the Welsh Regiment Museum, Cardiff, and from Robert Phillips’ excellent The Battle of Mametz Wood, 1916, which was commissioned with assistance from ACCAC and published by CAA in 2003. Slide6:  Robert Phillips’ The Battle of Mametz Wood, 1916 (CAA, 2003) is an excellent text for illustrating the Bigger Picture surrounding the Battle for Mametz Wood. The text follows a number of individuals experiences of war, Edward Clement among them, and tries to piece together what happened to these people. The text also explores different interpretations of the Battle of Mametz Wood, asking the question: Why does the Battle of Mametz Wood still cause argument? Slide7:  So when was Edward sent into battle at Mametz Wood? When Edward Clement was sent to France his regiment joined the 38th (Welsh) Division. On the 5th of July he was one of 20,000 soldiers who were sent to assemble along the front line opposite Mametz Wood. The first attack on Mametz Wood took place on the 7th July, but Edward’s Battalion did not go into action on this day. In fact, the 14th (Swansea) Battalion did not go into action until the 10th July. The 14th Battalion were involved in a full frontal assault on the woods and suffered heavy casualties as they made their advance. Slide8:  The assault was accompanied by a creeping barrage. Describe how a creeping barrage works? What is its purpose? Click on the screen to play the animation (XP, PowerPoint 2003) Slide9:  If there was poor communication between the artillery and the infantry, then a creeping barrage could cause devastation amongst its own Battalions. If it was well coordinated however, it provided good cover for the advancing troops, clearing the ground just ahead of them and disrupting the enemies defences. The creeping barrage was devised just before the Battle of the Somme and so was a new concept for the soldiers. Many groups of men did not understand how it worked and wandered into their own exploding shells. On top of this the Royal Artillery sometimes fired their howitzer’s at too short, or too long a range. According to the accounts of those involved in this assault on the wood, the noise of the barrage was terrifying in itself. It was difficult to shout out orders and many men, although advancing in an orderly fashion, were moving in all directions to avoid shell bursts and the ferocious machine-gun fire that was raking the ground ahead of them. Slide10:  Discuss: What does the word pandemonium mean? What does the source tell you about the assault on Mametz Wood that took place on the morning of 10th July? “Machine guns and rifles began to rattle, and there was a general state of pandemonium, little of which I can remember except that I myself was moving down the slope at a rapid rate, with bullet-holes in my pocket and yelling a certain amount. I noticed…that the men in advance of us were thoroughly demoralised. Out of the most terrible ‘mix-up’ I have ever seen I collected all of the men I could see and ordered them into the cutting.” Captain Glynn Jones, quoted in Robert Phillips’, The Battle of Mametz Wood, 1916, (CAA, 2003) The barrage put up on the 10th July was successful however and helped the men of the 10th, 13th and 14th Welch advance towards Mametz Wood, despite the German machine-guns which caused a great many casualties. Slide11:  “I could not push a way through it; years of neglect had turned the wood into a formidable barrier, a mile deep.” The next obstacle, once the wood was reached, was the thickness of the undergrowth and fallen trees and branches. Captain Glynn Jones, quoted in Robert Phillips’, The Battle of Mametz Wood, 1916, (CAA, 2003) Describe what you believe would have been some of the dangers faced by men fighting within a wooden area. Click here if you need some help Slide12:  “I could not push a way through it; years of neglect had turned the wood into a formidable barrier, a mile deep.” The next obstacle, once the wood was reached, was the thickness of the undergrowth and fallen trees and branches. Captain Glynn Jones, quoted in Robert Phillips’, The Battle of Mametz Wood, 1916, (CAA, 2003) Describe what you believe would have been some of the dangers faced by men fighting within a wooden area. Think: Could you move forward at the same pace as the creeping barrage? Was it easy to see the enemy? Could you get casualties out of the wood easily? Could you use the same ‘mass assault’ tactics when storming enemy positions? Did you always know where you were, or where you were going? Slide13:  Based upon the information that you have now been given, discuss and note down the ways in which Edward Clement could have been fatally wounded on the morning of the 10th July, 1916. Edward Clement. Possible Injuries Slide14:  The assault on Mametz Wood in which the 14th Welch were involved occurred on the 10th July, 1916. Yet, according to official records Edward did not die on this day, but later on…. The 14th Welch were withdrawn from the battle on the 11th July. Why do you think that the 14th Welch were withdrawn from the battle early on the morning of the 11th July? How do you account for Edward dying after the 10th July, although the 14th Welch were involved directly in the battle on this one day? A letter from Will Clement to his father Click below to read a letter that Edward’s brother sent home upon hearing of his death. This may provide some clues. Slide15:  Transcript Slide16:  B Ex F July 23rd _ 16 France Dear Father and Sister Just a line in reply to your very sad letter which I received yesterday. Well father I never dreamt that Eddie had been in action because I received a letter from him dated the 25th June from the Base stating that he was alright. Well father and sister I do trust that God will give you strength to bear this heavy blow which is heartbreaking to me as I see so many young lads go the same way nearly every day. But father I am very glad to know that he died at the hospital because I know now that he was buried respectable. Father and sister for my sake do try and bear the awful blow as it makes me worry thinking of you at home. I am doing my utmost to bear it. When writing to Mary tell her that I am very sorry that I can’t write to her. So no more at present but give my kind love to Maggie and Evan not forgetting yourselves. I remain your loving son - Will. P.S. You can tell Mrs. Lamluck that Charlie’s watch have been sent home by registered post and that I am very sorry that I can’t write to her at present, but one of his friends will write to her as soon as possible. Will. (I received cigarettes). Slide17:  i) Where was Edward’s brother when he received the news of his brothers death? ii) What does Will mean when he says “I see so many young lads go the same way”? iii) What do you think Will means when he says “I am very glad to know that he died at the hospital because I know now that he was buried respectable”? What does this tell us about the burial of many other soldiers at the Front? iv) What do you think Mr.Clement wrote in the letter to his son Will, when informing him of Edward’s death? Consider: Will is in the trenches himself and may be involved in a battle at any time, Edward was Will’s only brother, Mr. Clement is on his own at home… Slide18:  This was the first action that Edward had seen since arriving in France. Like all of the soldiers in France, his chance of survival was extremely low. The mixture of bombardments, gas, machine-guns and mines, as well as rifle fire and grenades was devastating. It must have taken a lot of courage for any man to have gone ‘over the top’. Now that you have read the letter, log on to the Commonwealth War Graves website and find out when Edward died and where he is buried. www.cwgc.org Explain why Edward died days after the battle on the 10th July. include where he died and how this is significant in the story of Edward Clement’s fate. Slide19:  Find the ‘Town or Place’ where Edward was taken once wounded. What information does this document give you about that place? Information taken from the Ministry of Pensions 1914-1919 Document held at the Museum of the Royal Regiment of Wales Slide20:  In Memory of Private E Clement 44283, 14th Battalion, Welch Regiment who died age 21 on 12th July, 1916. Son of David and Ann Clement of Hafod, Swansea. Remembered with honour. Buried at Heilly Station Cemetery, Mericourt-L’Abbe Slide21:  www.webmatters.net/france/ww1_mametz_wd2.htm www.s4c.co.uk/cerddedyllinell/e_mametz.shtml www.powell76.freeserve.co.uk/mametz.htm www.1914-1918.net/bat15.htm END

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