ecology collab chapter 5 lesson

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Information about ecology collab chapter 5 lesson
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Published on April 3, 2008

Author: Urania

Source: authorstream.com

Chapter 5 Ecology Collaborative:  Chapter 5 Ecology Collaborative Section 5 Tundra and Desert Biomes Tundra and Desert?:  Tundra and Desert? At first, you might think that tundra biomes have little in common with desert biomes. The tundra is the coldest of all the biomes. Deserts are the hottest. So what do they share? These biomes get the least amount of precipitation of all biomes. What else? Vocabulary:  Vocabulary Alpine tundra, arctic tundra, bog, cold desert, desert, extract, hot desert, permafrost, tundra In both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, prevailing winds blow from the east at about 30 degrees latitude, Warm air moving away from the equator dries out and cools, forming a subtropical high pressure, which causes the winds. These dry easterlies are the reason that many of the worlds deserts are located about 30 degrees from the equator:  In both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, prevailing winds blow from the east at about 30 degrees latitude, Warm air moving away from the equator dries out and cools, forming a subtropical high pressure, which causes the winds. These dry easterlies are the reason that many of the worlds deserts are located about 30 degrees from the equator Tundra Biomes:  Tundra Biomes The word tundra comes from the Finnish word tunturea, which means treeless plain. Tundra biomes are frozen landscapes, with low temperatures and few plants or animals. Tundra biomes have short growing seasons and get less than 25 cm rain a year. Most of the time it is frozen. There are two types of tundra biomes:  There are two types of tundra biomes The arctic tundra is located north of the Arctic Circle. The alpine tundra is located on mountains above the tree line, at high altitudes where trees cannot grow. Both Arctic and Alpine tundra have short summers and long winters. The major grasses are grasses, lichens and other plants that can survive without soil Arctic Tundra:  Arctic Tundra Arctic tundra is known for its short growing season, desert like conditions and cold temperatures. It stays so cold that underneath the topsoil is a permanently frozen layer of the soil. This layer is called the permafrost. During the summer the top layer of soil thaws, forming bogs and shallow ponds. A bog is an area of wet, spongy ground full of decomposing plant matter. Plants and Animals in the Arctic Tundra:  Plants and Animals in the Arctic Tundra Plants are lichens, mosses, grasses, small shrubs and short flowers. Animals hibernate to survive the lack of food in the winter. Many have adapted to breed and raise young quickly during the short cool summer. The tundra actually has more species than you might think. Herbivores like lemmings, musk, ox caribou, and arctic hares feed on the plants and shrubs. Carnivores like seals, walrus and other maring animals also visit here. The tundra has harsh conditions, yet it is very fragile. Footprints and tire tracks can remain on the ground for years. Soil forms very slowly. The biggest threat to the tundra is mining companies and global warming.:  The tundra has harsh conditions, yet it is very fragile. Footprints and tire tracks can remain on the ground for years. Soil forms very slowly. The biggest threat to the tundra is mining companies and global warming. Alpine Tundra:  Alpine Tundra Alpine tundra is found on the tops of mountains throughout the world. Although these environments are similar to the Arctic tundra, alpine habitats have longer growing seasons. There are many types of grasses, small trees and shrubs with small leaves. Animals may include mountain goats, sheep and elk. Desert Biomes:  Desert Biomes Some desert biomes are very sandy, others are covered with smooth stones or dry, cracked mud. Some are hot, others can be covered by a blanket of snow. However, like the tundra, deserts share one important characteristic, they are all very dry. The deserts get less than 25 cm of precipitation a year Deserts are spread out on five continents: Africa, Asia, N America S. America and Australia:  Deserts are spread out on five continents: Africa, Asia, N America S. America and Australia There are about 20 major deserts, most of which are hot deserts. Deserts like the Chihuahua Desert in N.America and the Sahara Desert in Africa are two examples. Hot deserts are hot year round The rest of the deserts are cold deserts which are hot during parts of the year and then some parts of the year the temperatures drop below freezing. Deserts like the Patagonia desert in Chile and the Great Basin Desert in N. America In addition to lack of rainfall, many deserts have a high rate of evaporation:  In addition to lack of rainfall, many deserts have a high rate of evaporation In some deserts, rain evaporates before it even hits the ground. One reason is that deserts have very little cloud cover. The suns radiation strikes the desert floor directly. Many deserts also have strong winds that increase the rate of evaporation Many deserts have soils that are rich in minerals. That is because the minerals are not washed out of the soil. Deserts have almost no topsoil because there is very little organic matter (humus):  Many deserts have soils that are rich in minerals. That is because the minerals are not washed out of the soil. Deserts have almost no topsoil because there is very little organic matter (humus) Life in the Desert.:  Life in the Desert. Everything that lives in the desert has adapted to conserve water, In hot dry deserts, species have also adapted to survive high temperatures and lack of shade. Desert Plants:  Desert Plants Desert plants have many adaptations that help them store and find water. Some desert plants have seeds that do not grow until there is enough rain. Many desert plants have small leaves and stems covered with wax Some desert plants have roots to reach the water underground. Others have shallow roots that absorb as much as possible when it rains. Other plants store water in their stems:  Some desert plants have roots to reach the water underground. Others have shallow roots that absorb as much as possible when it rains. Other plants store water in their stems Desert Animals:  Desert Animals Animals that live in the desert have as many adaptations for survival as plants do. Kangaroo rats, pocket mice and other small animals rarely drink. Larger animals such as antelopes travel long distances to find water, Still other organisms sleep through the dry times. With so little water, desert ecosystems are very hard to repair:  With so little water, desert ecosystems are very hard to repair When the plants disappear the animals that use them for food and shelter also disappear. This affects all desert animals, from hummingbirds to mountain lions. Without protection, desert ecosystems can become just as lifeless as many people think they are Lab:  Lab Staying warm in the Tundra. Animals that live in the tundra have special adaptations for staying warm. Environmentalist have noticed that many tundra animals are larger than their warm weather cousins. Large size may be an advantage to animals in cold weather climates.

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