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Eating

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Information about Eating
Education

Published on March 4, 2008

Author: ozturk

Source: authorstream.com

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Eating to Live, or Living to Eat?:  Eating to Live, or Living to Eat? Paula Martin, RD, LDN Program Outline:  Program Outline Background and Introduction Food intake 24 hr. recall Portion Distortion Top Food and Consumer Trends Current approaches for health promotion and disease prevention Tips Q & A Determine Your Intake : Food intake 24 hr. Recall:  Determine Your Intake : Food intake 24 hr. Recall Using the sheet provided: Write down everything you had to eat yesterday Write down everything you had to drink yesterday Start from the time you got up out of bed thru the time you got back into bed over 24 hours Keep your sheets for review Some reasons we choose what we eat::  Some reasons we choose what we eat: “Healthy” The Kids Wanted It Quick/Convenient It was on sale/right price Traditions Comfort Stress TASTE!!! Still the number one reason! Slide5:  Do You Know How Food Portions Have Changed in 20 Years? National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Obesity Education Initiative BAGEL :  BAGEL 20 Years Ago Today 140 calories 3-inch diameter How many calories are in this bagel? BAGEL :  140 calories 3-inch diameter Calorie Difference: 210 calories 350 calories 6-inch diameter BAGEL 20 Years Ago Today Slide8:  *Based on 130-pound person Maintaining a Healthy Weight is a Balancing Act Calories In = Calories Out How long do you have to rake the leaves to burn the extra 210 calories*? Slide9:  *Based on 130-pound person Calories In = Calories Out If you rake the leaves for 50 minutes you will burn the extra 210 calories * Slide10:  SPAGHETTI AND MEATBALLS 20 Years Ago Today 500 calories 1 cup spaghetti with sauce and 3 small meatballs How many calories do you think are in today's portion of spaghetti and meatballs? Slide11:  Calorie Difference: 525 calories 1,025 calories 2 cups of pasta with sauce and 3 large meatballs 20 Years Ago Today 500 calories 1 cup spaghetti with sauce and 3 small meatballs SPAGHETTI AND MEATBALLS Slide12:  *Based on 130-pound person Maintaining a Healthy Weight is a Balancing Act Calories In = Calories Out How long to you have to houseclean to burn the extra 525 calories*? Slide13:  *Based on 130-pound person Calories In = Calories Out If you houseclean for 2 hours and 35 minutes, you will burn approximately 525 calories * Slide14:  85 Calories 6.5 ounces How many calories are in today’s portion? SODA 20 Years Ago Today Slide15:  Calorie Difference: 165 Calories 250 Calories 20 ounces 85 Calories 6.5 ounces SODA 20 Years Ago Today Slide16:  *Based on 160-pound person Maintaining a Healthy Weight is a Balancing Act Calories In = Calories Out How long will you have to work in the garden to burn those extra calories*? Slide17:  *Based on 160-pound person Calories In = Calories Out If you work in the garden for 35 minutes, you will burn approximately 165 calories.* Slide18:  MUFFIN 20 Years Ago Today 210 calories 1.5 ounces How many calories are in today’s muffin? Slide19:  20 Years Ago Today Calorie Difference: 290 calories 500 calories 4 ounces MUFFIN 210 calories 1.5 ounces Slide20:  *Based on 130-pound person Maintaining a Healthy Weight is a Balancing Act Calories In = Calories Out How long will you have to vacuum in order to burn those extra 290 calories?* Slide21:  *Based on 130-pound person Calories In = Calories Out If you vacuum for 1 hour and 30 minutes you will burn approximately 290 calories.* Slide22:  CHICKEN CAESAR SALAD 20 Years Ago Today 390 calories 1 ½ cups How many calories are in today’s chicken Caesar salad? Slide23:  CHICKEN CAESAR SALAD 20 Years Ago Today 390 calories 1 ½ cups 790 calories 3 ½ cups Calorie Difference: 400 calories Trends in the U.S.:  Trends in the U.S. Eating More; Enjoying less (PewResearchCenter, 4/2006) 39% enjoy eating “a great deal,” down from 48% in 1989. (Gallup, Sept. 1989.) Six-in-ten Americans say they eat more than they should, either often (17%) or sometimes (42%). Since 1989, enjoyment of eating has fallen among all adults, but it has fallen most in those who describe themselves as overweight. People who reported they are overweight, dieting, worry about weight, dine out or have fast food at least 2 times a week and women all more prone to reporting they eat too much. Trends::  Trends: “Junk Food” intake Majority of Americans report they eat more junk food than they should, either often (19%) or sometimes (36%). Again more women and the other self-reported groups say they eat too much junk food Reasons: 73% convenient 44% it is what people like to eat 37% heavy advertisement 24% more affordable 14% people don’t know what foods are healthy Trends::  Trends: Who eats where and How often? 66% eat a meal in a restaurant at least once weekly Fast food intake is highest in males 47% vs. females 35% 59% of 18-29 year olds eat fast food at least once a week Top Emerging Global Food Trends (Institute of Food Technologists, April 2006):  Top Emerging Global Food Trends (Institute of Food Technologists, April 2006) Quick fix Take out service from full service restaurants Inherently healthy Fancy Layered flavorings Grazing Low-, no- and reduced DIY doctoring Ethnic meals Current approaches for health promotion and disease prevention:  Current approaches for health promotion and disease prevention Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2005 (www.healthierus.gov/dietaryguidelines) Make smart food choices from every food group. Find your balance between food and physical activity. Focus on fruits with at least 2 cups every day. Vary your veggies with at least 2 ½ cups each day. Eat more dark green and orange vegetables. Get 3 cups of low-fat or fat-free milk or the equivalent about of low-fat yogurt, or low-fat cheese. Eat at least 3 ounces of whole-grain cereals, breads, rice or pasta every day. Choose lean meats and poultry. Include fish, beans, peas, nuts and seeds more often. Know the limits on fats, salt, and sugars. Read the Nutrition Facts label on foods. Be physically active for at least 30 minutes most days of the week. Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH):  Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/hbp/prevent/h_eating/h_eating.htm American Cancer Society: Great American Eat Right Challenge:  American Cancer Society: Great American Eat Right Challenge http://www.cancer.org/docroot/PED/PED_9_Great_American_Eat_Right_Challenge.asp Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes Diet (TLC):  Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes Diet (TLC) http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/cgi-bin/chd/step2intro.cgi American Heart Association:  American Heart Association http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=1200000 American Diabetes Association:  American Diabetes Association http://vgs.diabetes.org/grocery_tour.jsp Slide35:  FOOD GROUP TIPS Slide36:  Go for whole. Use whole-grain ingredients: Brown rice for stir-fries and pilaf Whole wheat flour in baked goods Wrap it up for Health: Start with a sturdy, pliable wheat tortilla or flat bread Layer on well-dried greens: lettuce, spinach, or other greens Spread on cooked grains: bulgur, couscous, brown rice Flavor with salsa or salad dressing (go easy so the filling won’t be soggy Add crunchy veggies: diced bell peppers, onion, mushrooms, sprouts, drained or canned beans Top with meat, chicken or seafood (optional) Fold in the ends; roll! Source: 365 Days of Healthy Eating from The American Dietetic Association, 2004. Slide37:  Go for Green: Think beyond iceberg! Vary your salad greens: use spinach, romaine, watercress, chicory, escarole. Serve on a bed of greens. Arrange grilled or roasted fish, chicken, or meat atop tender-crisp green beans or wilted spinach. Get leafy. Tuck chopped fresh spinach and other greens into sandwiches, pita, and wraps—and in lasagna, risotto, pasta dishes and burritos. Nosh on green snacks: raw broccoli spears, asparagus spears, zucchini slices, or crisp snow peas. Sneak ‘Em In: Your family deserves the chance to experience new flavors, get the health benefits, and ultimately learn to enjoy vegetables in new ways. Serve salsa. Salsa (with tomatoes, beans, or other veggies) served with pita, bagel, or tortilla chips doesn't seem like a vegetable. Blend them in. Put shredded carrots in to mashed potatoes, or mix them with potatoes for twice-baked potatoes, chopped broccoli in macaroni and cheese, layered zucchini in lasagna, or shredded spinach in slaw. Serve on dish meals. That way, they can’t push away the veggie side dish. Source: 365 Days of Healthy Eating from The American Dietetic Association, 2004. Slide38:  Eat a variety of fresh, canned (in water or its own juice), or frozen fruits. Dried fruits are very portable. ¼ cup equals one fruit serving. Make your own trail mixes. Add dried fruits to cookies or salads. 100% fruit juice is the best option: however, 6 ounces or ¾ cup is one serving. Find grandma’s juice glasses! Serve a fruit rainbow at your next picnic: Berries, kiwi, apple, and pear slices…get creative with the kids. Top pancakes, French toast, and waffles with fruit puree. Swirl fresh, frozen, or canned fruit in a blender; thin with juice. Use fruit puree as a glaze for meat, poultry, or fish, too. Source: 365 Days of Healthy Eating from The American Dietetic Association, 2004. Slide39:  June is National Dairy Month. Enjoy milk in your morning coffee or tea. Drink your cereal milk too! As an afternoon snack drink low-fat strawberry, banana, or other flavored milk. Add a slice of flavor. Try a unique cheese—grated Asiago on grilled vegetables or hearty soup, dilled havarti with salmon, or gorgonzola with crisp apple or pear slices. Whirl a “more-than-fruit” smoothie. Blend milk, yogurt, or a calcium fortified soy beverage with your favorite fruits. Fortify! Blend in a little plain yogurt, grated cheese, or milk with mashed potatoes. Source: 365 Days of Healthy Eating from The American Dietetic Association, 2004 A word about lactose intolerance::  A word about lactose intolerance: Thirty million Americans are lactose intolerant. The “dairy” good news: If you’re lactose intolerant, probably still can enjoy milk with your cookies. Drink milk with food. Diluting lactose makes it easier to digests. Enjoy less more often. A ½ cup serving may be easier to digest than a cup. Use calcium fortified food products like orange juice, soy beverages, and some “women’s” oatmeal. Yogurt, or ice cream might be easier to digest. Consider using a dairy digestive aid. Adapted from: 365 Days of Healthy Eating from The American Dietetic Association, 2004 Slide41:  “Beans” actually refers to the whole legume family: chickpeas (garbanzos), lentils, peanuts, and soybeans---as well as black, kidney, lima, nave, pinto beans and many others. Try to enjoy beans twice a week. MyPyramid.gov recommendations: Choose low fat or lean meats and poultry without visible fat or skin. Bake it, broil it, or grill it. Vary you choices with more fish (12 oz. week). Breakfast for dinner? Vegetable omelets make a quick satisfying dinner. Little effort, plenty of nutrition. Turn a quick side dish, like boxed rice or grain mix, into and easy main dish. Fortify it by adding canned fish (packed in water, not oil), or poultry: chicken, crabmeat, salmon, shrimp or tuna. Use half the seasoning packet if able to reduce the salt content Canned beans: any kind. Rinse for less sodium and better digestibility Don’t forget the veggies! Enjoy! Adapted from: 365 Days of Healthy Eating from The American Dietetic Association, 2004 Slide42:  Not an actual food group. Make most of your fat sources from fish, nuts, and vegetable oils. Liquid at room temperature: Canola oil, corn oil, olive oil, soybean oil Naturally high in oil: Nuts, olives, some fish, avocados Importance: essential fatty acids, mono-and poly unsaturated fats do not raise “bad” (LDL) cholesterol, major source of vitamin E in the diet. Limit solid fats like butter, stick margarine, shortening, and lard. Balance fat intake with total calorie needs. One tablespoon of solid or liquid fat has around 120 calories. Source: www.MyPyramid.gov Tips: Shopping and Dining out:  Tips: Shopping and Dining out Half of a family’s food budget is consumed by dining out. Eating in more often is one of the fastest ways to stay on budget. Planning is necessary: involve entire family. Eat smarter when eating fast food: buy the “child size" every time. Be aware of what you are drinking and boost nutrition: buy 100% fruit drinks, fat-free milk or waters. Other tips to control costs: :  Other tips to control costs: Bring lunches and snacks to work Cook once, eat twice: Double whatever you’re making and freeze the excess (up to 3 months) for a later meal. Make at least one or two meatless meals each week. Avoid over-packaged, and highly advertised foods. Buy fruit and vegetables in season. Review contents of your fridge daily to use items before they go bad. Use the weekly grocery store circular and coupons to see what’s on sale and plan meals accordingly. Midafternoon slump tips::  Midafternoon slump tips: High carbohydrate meals may increase serotonin among some people and contribute to drowsiness For others, a slump may be part of your body rhythm, even if you get enough rest, eat smart, stay active, and manage stress. To keep your energy up midday: Eat lunch even if you are under pressure. Erratic eating can be any energy robber. Power up. Include lunch foods that stick longer: a salad with meat, poultry, cheese, nuts, tofu. Snack smart if you are hungry. Keep snacks handy to your work area: Fruit, juice, whole-wheat pretzels, yogurt, trail mix. Get up. Maybe you need to move, not eat. Walk to a colleague’s desk to rev up you metabolism. Source: 365 Days of Healthy Eating from The American Dietetic Association, R.Larson Duyff, MS,RD,FADA,CFCS:2004. Foods for Heart Health::  Foods for Heart Health: Foods with Potential Benefits: Beans, peas, barley Soybeans and other soy-based foods (not oil) Oats, Flaxseed (ground) Citrus Fruit Salmon, albacore tuna, sardines, mackerel Eggs with omega-3s Onions, scallions, shallots, garlic, leeks Red grapes, purple grape juice, red wine Vegetables Nuts (almonds, walnuts, pecans, hazelnuts, others Tea (green and black) Yogurt, buttermilk with live cultures Some cholesterol lowering spreads Functional Significance: Soluble fiber, saponins Soy protein, isoflavones, saponins, plant sterols, perhaps fiber Soluble fiber, ligan Flavonoids, ferulic acid, caffeic acid Omega-3 fatty acids Omega-3 fatty acids Allyl sulfides Phenols, reseratrol, ellagic acid Plant sterols, ferulic acid, antioxidants, Phytic acid, arginine, plant sterols Catechins Probiotics Plant sterol and stanol esters Source: R.L.Duyff, American Dietetic Association Complete Food and Nutrtion Guide (New York: John Wiley& Sons, 2002.)

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