E 01 Introduction 3 10 2003

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Information about E 01 Introduction 3 10 2003
Education

Published on January 15, 2008

Author: Vincenza

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Slide1:  Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora www.CITES.org Introductory Session © Copyright CITES Secretariat 2003 Overview:  Overview What is CITES? How CITES works The benefits of CITES Partnerships CITES in the region Summary What is CITES?:  What is CITES? CITES:  CITES CITES is the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora It is also known as the Washington Convention, as it was signed in Washington D.C. …in operation for 28 years CITES was signed on 3 March 1973, and entered into force on 1 July 1975 CITES:  CITES 164 …is relevant to an ever-increasing number of Parties Popular perceptions of CITES:  Perception of the public… of Government… and traders… Popular perceptions of CITES Slide7:  CITES is a powerful tool for achieving effective and consistent regulation of international trade in wild species to ensure their conservation and sustainable use CITES CITES:  CITES CITES is an international convention that combines wildlife and trade themes with a legally binding instrument for achieving conservation and sustainable use objectives CITES:  CITES CITES is an agreement between governments Its purpose is to ensure that wild fauna and flora in international trade are not exploited unsustainably Slide10:  Misconceptions about CITES CITES deals with all aspects of wildlife conservation CITES deals only with international trade in certain species included in its Appendices CITES aims to ban all wildlife trade CITES aims to regulate international trade (for some species trade is highly restricted) Misconceptions about CITES:  Misconceptions about CITES CITES regulates domestic trade CITES can only address international trade The CITES Appendices are a listing of the world’s endangered species The Appendices only list those species that are or may be affected by international trade Slide12:  Misconceptions about CITES CITES imposes trade restrictions on developing countries Both producer and consumer countries have responsibility for conserving and managing resources; CITES creates the means for international cooperation and decision-making How CITES works:  How CITES works How CITES works:  How CITES works The Convention establishes the international legal framework and common procedural mechanisms for the prevention of international commercial trade in endangered species, and for an effective regulation of international trade in others How CITES works:  How CITES works This framework and common procedural mechanism is now used by 164 countries (the Conference of the Parties) to regulate and monitor international trade in wild resources Slide16:  Examples of trade - animals Primates Hunting trophies Birds of prey Parrots & parakeets Crocodilians Snakes & lizards Turtles & tortoises Live aquarium specimens Food fishes Spiders & butterflies Molluscs & corals Slide17:  Examples of trade - plants Orchids Cacti & succulents Bulbs (Snowdrops, Cyclamens) Medicinal plants Ornamental trees Timber species Slide18:  Mapping CITES trade Major importing areas North America Europe East Asia Major importing & exporting areas Asia Southern Africa Middle East Eastern Europe Major exporting areas South America Central America Africa Asia Slide19:  Conference of the Parties Standing Committee Secretariat Plants Committee Nomenclature Committee Animals Committee UNEP TRAFFIC IUCN UNEP-WCMC How CITES works Other NGOs Slide20:  How CITES works How CITES works:  How CITES works 72 Resolutions and 154 Decisions are in effect The Conference of the Parties adopts Resolutions to guide the interpretation and implementation of the Convention, and Decisions to provide specific short-term time-bound instructions Slide22:  How CITES works The Convention and its Appendices are legally binding, but national legislation is required to apply its provisions How CITES works:  How CITES works National legislation to implement CITES must, at the very least: designate a Management Authority and a Scientific Authority prohibit trade in specimens in violation of the Convention penalize such trade allow for confiscation of specimens illegally traded or possessed How CITES works:  How CITES works The Management Authority is responsible for the administrative aspects of implementation (legislation, permits, annual and biennial reports on trade, communication with other CITES agencies) How CITES works:  How CITES works The Scientific Authority is responsible for advising the Management Authority on non-detriment findings and other scientific aspects of implementation, and monitoring of national trade How CITES works:  How CITES works Species subject to CITES regulation are divided amongst three Appendices: Appendix I includes species threatened with extinction Appendix II includes species not necessarily threatened with extinction, but for which trade must be controlled to avoid their becoming threatened includes species that resemble species already included in Appendix I or II Appendix III includes species for which a country is asking Parties to help with its protection Slide27:  How CITES works Appendix I International (commercial) trade is generally prohibited Appendix II International trade is permitted but controlled Appendix III International trade is permitted but controlled (generally less restrictive than Appendix II) How CITES works:  How CITES works Appendix I Almost 530 animal species and some 300 plant species Appendix II More than 4,400 animal species and more than 28,000 plant species Appendix III Some 240 animal species and about 40 plant species How CITES works:  How CITES works The Conference of the Parties is the only body that can decide on the contents of Appendices I and II Any proposal to amend the Appendices requires a two-thirds majority of voting Parties for it to be adopted. Only Parties may propose amendments to the Appendices Slide30:  CITES regulates the export, re-export and import of live and dead animals and plants and their parts and derivatives (for listed species only) This regulation is based on a system of permits and certificates that may only be issued if certain conditions are met and which must be presented when leaving or entering a country For Appendix I and II-listed species, the most important condition is that international trade in these species must not be detrimental to their survival in the wild How CITES works How CITES works:  How CITES works There are special provisions for: Personal and household effects Pre-Convention specimens Captive-bred or artificially propagated specimens Scientific exchange Travelling exhibitions How CITES works:  How CITES works CITES documents are standardized for: Format Language & terminology Information Duration of validity Issuance procedures Clearance procedures How CITES works:  How CITES works There are four types of CITES documents: Export permits Import permits Re-export certificates Other certificates How CITES works:  How CITES works Export permits Export permits can only be issued by the Management Authority, provided the Scientific Authority has advised that the proposed export will not be detrimental to the survival of the species The Management Authority must be satisfied that the specimen was legally obtained The Management Authority must be satisfied that living specimens will be prepared and shipped in a manner that will minimize the risk of injury, damage to health or cruel treatment How CITES works:  How CITES works Import permits (Applies only to specimens of Appendix-I species) Import permits can only be issued by the Management Authority, when the Scientific Authority has advised that the proposed import will be for purposes that are not detrimental to the survival of the species Note: by taking stricter domestic measures a number of Parties (e.g. the member States of the European Union) also require import documents for specimens of Appendix II species How CITES works:  How CITES works Re-export certificates Re-export certificates may only be issued by the Management Authority, and only when that authority is satisfied that the specimens have been imported in accordance with the provisions of the Convention How CITES works:  How CITES works Other certificates These are used for particular cases such as: Captive-bred or artificially propagated specimens Pre-Convention specimens Traveling exhibitions Introduction from the Sea Appendix III certificate of origin Labels for scientific exchange Slide38:  How CITES works Similar rules and regulations Similar requirements Similar authorities Similar procedures Similar documents COMMON PROCEDURAL MECHANISMS The benefits of CITES:  The benefits of CITES The benefits of CITES:  The benefits of CITES Effective and consistent international regulation of trade in wildlife for conservation and sustainable use International cooperation on trade and conservation, legislation and enforcement, resource management, conservation science Participation as a global player in managing and conserving wildlife at the international level Slide41:  Partnerships Partnerships with Conventions:  Partnerships with Conventions CITES collaborates directly with a number of Conventions, such as: Convention on Biological Diversity Basel Convention Ramsar Convention on Migratory Species International Convention on the Regulation of Whaling This collaboration can involve Resolutions and Decisions of the Conference of the Parties, joint work activities, etc. Collaboration can be across common areas of work, such as joint Customs training, enforcement, streamlining annual reporting, harmonization of legislation etc. Slide43:  Partnerships with Organisations World Customs Organization Interpol IUCN-SSC TRAFFIC Network UNEP-World Conservation Monitoring Centre Internal partnerships:  Internal partnerships Inter-agency cooperation and partnerships at the national level are also important CITES Authorities Customs Police Judiciary Resource sectors Slide45:  CITES in the region Slide46:  CITES in the region Slide47:  Summary Slide48:  Summary CITES is an international agreement between governments that ensures that no species of wild fauna or flora is unsustainably exploited for international trade The Convention establishes the international legal framework and common procedural mechanisms for the prevention of international trade in endangered species, and for an effective regulation of international trade in others Slide49:  Summary CITES regulates international trade in specimens of species of wild fauna and flora listed in its Appendices on the basis of a system of permits and certificates which are issued only when certain conditions are met, and which must be presented when leaving or entering a country For Appendix-I listed species, international trade is generally prohibited For Appendix-II and –III listed species, international trade is permitted but regulated Slide50:  Summary The Conference of the Parties adopts Resolutions and Decisions to guide interpretation of the Convention and to direct its activities and those of the permanent committees and the Secretariat National legislation is required to implement the Convention CITES is a powerful tool for achieving consistent international regulation of trade in wildlife for conservation and sustainable use The Aims of CITES:  The Aims of CITES Regulated trade (effective and consistent) Science-based decisions Cooperation at multiple levels Conservation results Sustainable use of wildlife Towards a ’green’ certification?

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