Drinking contaminated water

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Information about Drinking contaminated water
Health & Medicine

Published on March 5, 2014

Author: ConstructKingLgx

Source: slideshare.net

Description

Towns and cities go to great lengths to confirm that their citizens’ water supply is safe and clean. Millions of dollars go into cleaning water, maintaining water pipes, and monitoring potential threats.

Drinking Contaminated Water Towns and cities go to great lengths to confirm that their citizens’ water supply is safe and clean. Millions of dollars go into cleaning water, maintaining water pipes, and monitoring potential threats. Some areas require water filters and others do not. Every once in a while, something goes wrong and people suddenly realize how important water is to them. But usually, that doesn’t happen. We drink and cook and bathe freely without a second thought. Then, there are people who prefer to supply their own water. People build personal wells or tap into fresh-water springs on their property. However, health threats to their water supplies are much more common. The subsurface water they use can become contaminated so easily if not properly looked after. Water Demons There are all sorts of evil things that can contaminate your water supply (both private and public). In many cases, these contaminates are odorless, tasteless, and colorless – making them difficult to identify without specific testing. This is why frequent testing of your water supply is so important. Some of these little demons that affect water include: bacteria, E. coli, nitrates, herbicides, and pesticides. These contaminates may result from septic tank leaks, storage tank leaks, uncontrolled hazardous waste, landfills, chemicals, road salts, and even atmospheric contaminants. No matter what the source, they all basically work the same way: A leak springs from some sort of tank. Or, surface toxins (like road salt, herbicides, etc.) get washed into the soil by rain or melting snow. The contents seep into the ground and enter the subsurface water supply. It eventually makes its way into your well or spring and contaminates the pureness of your water. Side Effects But what are the actual consequences of this type of water contamination? The answer: sickness or even death. However, luckily, it doesn’t always end so grimly. Symptoms may come on slowly and provide warning signs. For example, stomach problems like nausea, vomiting, cramps, and diarrhea are common. Other times, the consequences are immediate. For example, exposure to E. coli will hit seriously and fairly suddenly. Your water supply will be an instant suspect in such a case.

Prevention The best way to avoid getting sick through your water supply is to be informed and maintain it properly. Do you know exactly where your water is coming from? Is it in proximity to any septic tanks or toxic waste storage? Are herbicides or pesticides used in the surrounding area? Is your piping system clean, secure, and well-maintained? These are all important questions to ask yourself. Beyond such preparation, it is important to have your water supply checked at least 3 times a year if you have your own water supply. (If you use public supplies, they will monitor it carefully for you.) You can have a professional come in and test your water supply or learn to do it yourself. By maintaining your water system, testing it often, and always being aware of possible water-contamination symptoms, you should be fine enjoying your own, personal supply of fresh, clean water! Photo Credit: Wikipedia, Ricardo Bernardo

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