document905

50 %
50 %
Information about document905
Education

Published on January 6, 2009

Author: aSGuest9374

Source: authorstream.com

Slide 1: Photo: Light exploration at the Herbert as part of Second Skin pilot phase The idea behind Creative Partnershipsis a simple one : to animate the nationalcurriculum…. thesciences as well as the arts and to enrichschool life by making best uses of the UK’s creative wealth. Slide 2: What is Creative Partnerships working towards? What does Creative Partnerships seek to achieve? : What does Creative Partnerships seek to achieve? Its four principle objectives are to develop: The creativity of young people, raising their aspirations and achievements the skills of teachers and their ability to work with creative practitioners schools’ approaches to culture, creativity and partnership working; and the skills, capacity and sustainability of the creative industries Slide 4: Creative Partnerships addresses …. The Educational Agenda (DfES) Desired outcomes: - Greater understanding of creative expertise / range of creative practices available - Profession confident to take risks / seek change to achieve educational goals The Cultural and Creative agenda (DCMS) Desired outcomes: - Better understanding of needs of educators - Cultural and creative engagement integral to educational experience - Sector capacity developed - Long term sustainability for sector and What’s the Creative Partnerships story so far ? : What’s the Creative Partnerships story so far ? 36 area offices based in the most deprived communities in England £174m DCMS /£12.5m DfES Working intensively with 1162 schools, provided programmes and CPD to a further 1397 schools and disseminated practice to a further 5904 schools Worked directly with 545,000 young people, 50,088 teachers Trained 25,917 teachers and 6,237 creative practitioners Slide 6: And in Coventry we are working with ….. - 18 schools/settings intensively 16 more at project level 49 through involvement in professional development opportunities (training sessions, conferences, research) Plus all Coventry schools receive copies of Newsletters, case studies, invites to Conference and CPD opportunities Artist development occurs within projects; 60 engaged in additional training Also we work with a further 10 schools in Warwickshire and Solihull sub-region through additional DfES funding Creative Partnerships Coventry Objectives : Creative Partnerships Coventry Objectives To cultivate the attitudes, understandings and skills essential to creativity To offer young people opportunities to: - Influence and shape their environments and learning experiences - Value the cultural vibrancy of the city of Coventry - Develop and recognise their varied intelligences and voices To promote a learning culture which fosters curiosity and a desire to investigate, collaborative learning and reflective practice To celebrate and communicate the power and impact of lessons learned in order to embed practice Slide 8: How are we working? How do we do it? : How do we do it? Start with the school improvement plan Support proper planning and research Ask questions and offer challenge Train teachers and practitioners Broker and support long-term, developmental relationships between teaching staff and creative practitioners Evaluate and reflect Photo: Light exploration at the LAB April 2005 Slide 10: How are the schools involved in Coventry? 18 schools bid, and were selected (to national and local criteria) 1 children’s centre, 9 primary, 1 special, 1 PRU and 6 secondary. Schools are organised into 3 ‘Homegroups’ of 5 - 7 schools each = a research family working to a common focus Home group schools commit to work collaboratively to investigate and share what they learn Each school defines its own research focus but within the agreed focus area Opportunities are made to make different connections between CP schools Photo: Creative Partnerships Kent Slide 11: School Groups’ Interests centre around: Developing creative approaches to inclusive learning Centre 4 PRU, Deedmore Special Primary, Edgewick Community Primary,Foxford Secondary & Community College, Hillfields Early Years Centre, Lyng Hall Secondary, St Mary & St Benedicts’ Roman Catholic Primary Development of creative curriculum Blue Coat Church of England Secondary, Ernesford Grange Secondary & Community College, Pearl Hyde Primary, St Bartholomew’s Church of England Primary, Tile Hill Wood Secondary. Building creative learning cultures Finham Park Secondary, Stivichall Primary, Finham Primary, Courthouse Green Primary, Southfields Primary, Earlsdon Primary. Slide 12: How do we measure our effectiveness ? Is it working? : Is it working? Creative Partnerships completed four major pieces of research on the impact of the programme nationally: NFER – Tracking 13,000 young people (completed February 2006) BMRB – 650 head teacher interviews (completed March 2006) BOP – Impact on the Creative Industries (completed July 2006) OFSTED – Programme Evaluation (completed July 2006, Reported October 1 2006) NFER – Impact on young people : NFER – Impact on young people “Young people known to have attended Creative Partnership activities outperformed those in the same schools who had not by a statistically significant margin at all three stages (Key Stages 2, 3 and 4).” “This was evident in average scores, English, mathematics and science in key stages 2 and 3 and in total points scores, best 8 points scores and science at key stage 4.” BMRB – Impact on young people : BMRB – Impact on young people 91% have seen an improvement in pupils’ confidence and communication skills 87% have seen an improvement in pupils’ motivation 79% felt that Creative Partnerships has improved attainment at the school BMRB – Impact on teachers : BMRB – Impact on teachers 94% have seen an improvement in the teaching skills of their teachers 92% can see their teachers to be more effective in using creative professionals in the classroom 92% can see that their teachers are more willing to take a creative approach Numbers were greater for schools in deprived wards BOP – Impact on creative practitioners : BOP – Impact on creative practitioners 74% of creative practitioners say CP offers more space and time for creative practice development than other forms of work. 66% of creative practitioners say CP allows more risk taking than other forms of work 59% of creative practitioners had improved their creative practice as a direct result of working with CP. Approximately 70% of all CP expenditure is spent on creative practitioners Ofsted – Impact on young people : Ofsted – Impact on young people “Most Creative Partnerships programmes were effective in developing in pupils some attributes of creative people: an ability to improvise, take risks, show resilience, and collaborate with others. “Convincing evidence was provided in all CP areas visited about the contribution to the ECM outcomes. The vast majority of pupils directly involved enjoyed their education in and through CP: good behaviour, co-operation, enthusiasm and pride were common outcomes.” “Improvements in literacy, particularly writing, and speaking were significant in the majority of schools visited.” Ofsted – Impact on young people : Ofsted – Impact on young people “For some pupils their involvement in CP proved a turning point; good attendance and participation in learning continued beyond the project.” “The relevance of learning was a consistently good feature … Pupils were particularly driven to learn when working for a purpose involved meeting deadlines, satisfying a real need or playing a role that others depended upon.” “Pupils’ self-confidence developed through collaborative work contributed to clear, fluent and sometimes adventurous use of complex vocabulary.” Ofsted – Impact on Teachers : Ofsted – Impact on Teachers “CP had been effective in broadening the perception of pupils and teachers that creativity can be expressed through many different areas and aspects of the curriculum.”. “In schools senior and middle leaders were committed to Creative Partnerships for accelerating school improvements and focusing their vision.” “Creative practitioners were very well trained and well matched to school priorities and needs. Most teachers gained an understanding about teaching that promoted pupils’ creativity and creative teaching by learning alongside pupils.” Slide 21: National evaluation of development of creative learning behaviours CP has developed and this year implemented a framework for measuring the impact of our programmes on the development of creativity Before and after (in dialogue), partners / participants rate the significance to the overall success of the project of … the project idea; values and processes / resources / language which the creative partner brings; the learning environment During and after (through a questionnaire and interview) partners /participants rate the project for themselves and for the young people involved in terms of the development of creative behaviours? 1(no change) – 4 (radical change) Results from first 9 months due Early 2007 (see next slide Slide 22: Creative learning behaviours Identifying problems …and … solving problems Thinking divergently ...and… generating new ideas Being fascinated in the moment …and … becoming more engaged Learning increasing their capacity Collaboratively …and… to learn in new ways Taking risks …and… becoming more confident Being challenged …and… learning new skills Refining …and… valuing ‘real world’ outcomes Slide 23: What kinds of work is happening? Slide 24: Pilot involved 11 artists from different disciplines and teachers from 9 schools / nursery setting Professional development time to research, share skills, develop a LAB type environment to test ideas and ways of working. Reggio visit Adaptation of ideas into 5 school settings through action research projects Currently developing LA partnership to extend to children's centres and schools across city Second Skin – Building creative Learning environments Photo: LAB exploration visit, May 2005 Slide 25: Space of Possibilities: actively inventing a cultural strategy for Coventry with young people 13 schools / approx 120 children; 13 artists / creative organisations finding out what excites children /what they think excites other people? How do they want their city to feel? raising young people’s awareness of the diversity and richness of the creative talent and ‘culture’ in their city Setting a brief for Talking Birds to realise as a ‘Space of Possibilities’ at the Ricoh arena as part of Made in Coventry 2007 - generating young ‘ambassadors’ capable of representing and innovating towards a new creative and cultural vision of the city and of their schools. Slide 26: Young Creative Producers of Public Art In 2005 young people researched the cultures of their city, developed skills and confidence as designers and producers of public art and were part of a major cultural event in the city In 2006 we ran a Creative careers event open to all year 11 pupils in the city In 2007, with partners,we are working to link such work into a cultural offer Spirit of Coventry opening ceremony, Ernesford Grange July 2005 Masterplan : Masterplan Developing young people as investigators into and designers of their city and school environments Working in new /virtual media to research and test ideas with wider community and explore possibilities Stivichall Primary 2005 Slide 28: Designing for school improvement – toilets at Finham Park and Tile Hill Wood / re-build at Stivichall Image: Janet Vaughan, Talking Birds, Finham Park Secondary 2005 Ultimate Questions : Ultimate Questions Year 8 pupils working as creative investigators of their year 7 humanities curriculum - Researching and consulting peers, parents, friends within and without school. - Initiating new recognition of ways of learning more collaboratively for teachers and pupils, and cross departmentally Ultimate Questions – Foxford March 2006

Add a comment

Related presentations

Related pages

12th Quarterly Report for Oakland NSA - scribd.com

Case3:00-cv-04599-TEH Document905 Filed01/30/13 Page1 of 85. Twelfth Quarterly Report of the Independent Monitor for the Oakland Police Department
Read more

ELECTRIC PRELIMINARY STATEMENT PART DU Sheet 1 COMMUNITY ...

ELECTRIC PRELIMINARY STATEMENT PART DU Sheet 1 COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION IMPLEMENTATION COSTS BALANCING ... Microsoft Word - Document905 Author:
Read more

Tech company wage-fixing suit: Proposal for final approval ...

A proposed order granting plaintiffs' motion for final approval of class action settlements regarding high-tech employee antitrust litigation against ...
Read more

Tech company wage-fixing suit: Proposal for final approval ...

Tech company wage-fixing suit: Proposal for final approval of settlements - Free download as PDF File (.pdf), Text File (.txt) or read online for free. A ...
Read more

Féminin, Masculin: anthropologie des catégories et des ...

Pour commander cet ouvrage: http://leportique.revues.org/document905.html. Citations Citations 2; References References 0;
Read more

www.allianceonline.co.uk

onlin>e Alliance 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 8. 9. Capital Equipment Warranty Policy The following outlines the terms of warranty for all capital equipment.
Read more

Clowns, Knutselen and Deko on Pinterest

See more about Clowns, Knutselen and Deko.
Read more

Pacific Gas and Electric Search - pge.com

Pacific Gas and Electric Search Results. Skip To Main Content. Open Navigation Menu
Read more

www.sggp.org.vn

SÀI GÒN GIẢI PHÓNG Online http://www.sggp.org.vn SBD Ho Ten NgaySinh VAN TOAN NN 40000 Nguyễn Thị NgọcHương 16/02/1992 3.25 0.25 2.75 40001 ...
Read more