Demystifying Information Architecture

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Information about Demystifying Information Architecture

Published on June 13, 2008

Author: PatrickKennedy

Source: slideshare.net

Description

Presentation from WebDU 2008 in Sydney, where I attempt to give developers and designers some insight into what IA is and how it works, so they can integrate it into their own practices or just work more effectively with IA/UX practitioners

Demystifying Information Architecture Patrick Kennedy

“ The usability guy says you can’t do that” Does this sound familiar?

“ The usability guy says you can’t do that”

“ You know what you can do with your heuristics?!” Or maybe it’s more like this?

“ You know what you can do with your heuristics?!”

Overview There is much confusion and ignorance regarding information architecture (IA) and it's place in web design. Many developers, like their design counterparts, are operating under misconceptions , hearsay and indeed disinformation . Because of this, many feel threatened by the 'usability guy' telling them what to do. This presentation will introduce IA for websites--with the theory and techniques being equally applicable to intranets and RIAs--and explain the fundamental principles and some simple techniques. The aim is to give the audience a heads-up and point them in the right direction so they can integrate IA into their own work or just better collaborate with those IA and usability folks.

There is much confusion and ignorance regarding information architecture (IA) and it's place in web design.

Many developers, like their design counterparts, are operating under misconceptions , hearsay and indeed disinformation .

Because of this, many feel threatened by the 'usability guy' telling them what to do.

This presentation will introduce IA for websites--with the theory and techniques being equally applicable to intranets and RIAs--and explain the fundamental principles and some simple techniques.

The aim is to give the audience a heads-up and point them in the right direction so they can integrate IA into their own work or just better collaborate with those IA and usability folks.

A bit about me Two-minute resume Electrical and Computer Systems Engineer Front and back-end web developer Team leader and ‘solutions architect’ Information Architect User Experience consultant Industry exposure IT and corporate Marketing, advertising and media

Two-minute resume

Electrical and Computer Systems Engineer

Front and back-end web developer

Team leader and ‘solutions architect’

Information Architect

User Experience consultant

Industry exposure

IT and corporate

Marketing, advertising and media

So you think you can IA? do “ I drew a site map, I’m doing IA!”

So you think you can IA? “ We wireframe everything!” do

So you think you can IA? “ Usability testing? Yep, we all think it works great.” do

So you think you can IA? “ We surveyed what our users want!” do

So you think you can IA? “ I installed Visio… I am an Information Architect!” do

What IA isn’t Information Architecture is not… Simply drawing up a sitemap Simply pumping out masses of ‘wireframes’ Designing for yourselves Just about navigation A frivolous expense for ‘Rolls Royce’ projects only A ‘nice to have’ item on a checklist Database design (at least not for this session!)

Information Architecture is not…

Simply drawing up a sitemap

Simply pumping out masses of ‘wireframes’

Designing for yourselves

Just about navigation

A frivolous expense for ‘Rolls Royce’ projects only

A ‘nice to have’ item on a checklist

Database design (at least not for this session!)

So what is IA? Information Architecture is… The practice of designing, for a website or intranet, the: Site structure Navigation Labelling Often a synonym for ‘usability’ or ‘User Centred Design’, which involves: Understanding users and their needs Designing with those needs in mind (balanced by business context and content) Validating design decisions with user involvement

Information Architecture is…

The practice of designing, for a website or intranet, the:

Site structure

Navigation

Labelling

Often a synonym for ‘usability’ or ‘User Centred Design’, which involves:

Understanding users and their needs

Designing with those needs in mind (balanced by business context and content)

Validating design decisions with user involvement

The basics of IA

Structure

Navigation

Labelling

The basics of IA The three interrelated pillars of IA Site structure – categorisation, classification, hierarchy Navigation – accessing the site structure, ‘findability’ Labelling – naming sections, links, navigation etc Image credits Travel destinations page for major news website Source: www.news.com.au/travel/australia/0,26063,,00.html

The three interrelated pillars of IA

Site structure – categorisation, classification, hierarchy

Navigation – accessing the site structure, ‘findability’

Labelling – naming sections, links, navigation etc

Image credits

Travel destinations page for major news website

Source: www.news.com.au/travel/australia/0,26063,,00.html

More broadly… IA is User Centered Design (UCD) Which generally speaking, involves: Understanding users and their needs (balanced by business context and available/necessary content) Designing with those needs in mind Validating design decisions with user involvement Other synonyms include ‘usability’ or ‘user experience’

IA is User Centered Design (UCD)

Which generally speaking, involves:

Understanding users and their needs (balanced by business context and available/necessary content)

Designing with those needs in mind

Validating design decisions with user involvement

Other synonyms include ‘usability’ or ‘user experience’

A general IA process Research Understand the audience and context Solve the problem at hand Design Test design against requirements Validate

Research

A general IA process Research User research Business objectives Conventions and best practice (defacto standards) Design Use knowledge of users Involve them in the process Balance user needs, business objectives and possible content Validate Usability testing and iterative design

Research

User research

Business objectives

Conventions and best practice (defacto standards)

Design

Use knowledge of users

Involve them in the process

Balance user needs, business objectives and possible content

Validate

Usability testing and iterative design

A general IA process Research Understand the audience and context Solve the problem at hand Design Test design against requirements Validate

Research

Research Get out there and understand your users What do they need? What do they want? How do they use technology? How might they use your product? What information do they need?

Get out there and understand your users

What do they need?

What do they want?

How do they use technology?

How might they use your product?

What information do they need?

User research techniques

User research techniques Many different research activities Interviews, expert review, heuristic review Surveys, focus groups and other market research techniques Competitor analysis, best practice review Ethnographic activities such as contextual inquiry and diary studies Web analytics, search engine logs, CRM, sales data analysis Image credits Workplace observation (left) Source: Step Two Designs Contextual inquiry, also known as a “site visit” (top right) Source: www.hillaryelmore.com/images/contextualinquiry.jpg Focus group (bottom right) Source: www.mosman.nsw.gov.au/planningreview/images/24.jpg

Many different research activities

Interviews, expert review, heuristic review

Surveys, focus groups and other market research techniques

Competitor analysis, best practice review

Ethnographic activities such as contextual inquiry and diary studies

Web analytics, search engine logs, CRM, sales data analysis

Image credits

Workplace observation (left)

Source: Step Two Designs

Contextual inquiry, also known as a “site visit” (top right)

Source: www.hillaryelmore.com/images/contextualinquiry.jpg

Focus group (bottom right)

Source: www.mosman.nsw.gov.au/planningreview/images/24.jpg

There’s something about Mary “ I want to go on holiday, somewhere in Australia” “ But I’m not sure where to go…” “… or what each city has to offer”

There’s something about Mary End-to-end example of IA process To illustrate how we go about ‘doing IA’ we shall follow a fictional story First we start with user research, in which we meet Mary Mary is in the target audience group for a travel website She is looking to go travelling within Australia and uses the web a fair bit Image credits Design storyboard comic by Martin Hardee of Sun Microsystems Source: blogs.sun.com/MartinHardee/entry/design_comics_templates_1_0

End-to-end example of IA process

To illustrate how we go about ‘doing IA’ we shall follow a fictional story

First we start with user research, in which we meet Mary

Mary is in the target audience group for a travel website

She is looking to go travelling within Australia and uses the web a fair bit

Image credits

Design storyboard comic by Martin Hardee of Sun Microsystems

Source: blogs.sun.com/MartinHardee/entry/design_comics_templates_1_0

Other research “ We need to drive traffic to the destination guides!” “ What content do we already have?”

Other research Continuing our story… There is more than just user research we need to do Must also include business stakeholders (such as Pravin on the left) What are the business objectives? What should the website achieve? And the context we have to design in (might include content inventory) Image credits Design storyboard comic by Martin Hardee of Sun Microsystems Source: blogs.sun.com/MartinHardee/entry/design_comics_templates_1_0 Site map of screenshots (right) Source: Step Two Designs

Continuing our story…

There is more than just user research we need to do

Must also include business stakeholders (such as Pravin on the left)

What are the business objectives? What should the website achieve?

And the context we have to design in (might include content inventory)

Image credits

Design storyboard comic by Martin Hardee of Sun Microsystems

Source: blogs.sun.com/MartinHardee/entry/design_comics_templates_1_0

Site map of screenshots (right)

Source: Step Two Designs

Research A general IA process Understand the audience and context Solve the problem at hand Design Test design against requirements Validate

Research

Design Devising a solution that meets the defined needs As with visual design, or any other kind of design, the aim is to solve the problem Inputs to design include existing knowledge, such as: Categorisation schemes (eg alphabetical, chronological, geographical, by subject/topic) Conventions (eg search top right) And of course what we have learnt from our research, for instance: Needs and behaviour of audience Practical limitations on content and technology Business drivers and requirements Commonly, IA design exists on two interrelated levels: High level IA is the structure of the site (or more generically the information) Low level IA is the design of the interface; navigation and page layout

Devising a solution that meets the defined needs

As with visual design, or any other kind of design, the aim is to solve the problem

Inputs to design include existing knowledge, such as:

Categorisation schemes (eg alphabetical, chronological, geographical, by subject/topic)

Conventions (eg search top right)

And of course what we have learnt from our research, for instance:

Needs and behaviour of audience

Practical limitations on content and technology

Business drivers and requirements

Commonly, IA design exists on two interrelated levels:

High level IA is the structure of the site (or more generically the information)

Low level IA is the design of the interface; navigation and page layout

High level design

High level IA design activities Many approaches to design A site map is the most common output of high level design Card sorting is the most common activity for IA Crosses the border between research and design Gets user input on categorisation of information, and labelling too Other activities include brainstorms and parallel design Image credits Example of typical site map (top left) Source: www.treith.com/ia_presentation/16sitemap.html Mind map used as site map (bottom left) Source: www.neuralmatters.com/SiteMap.aspx Results of a card sorting session (right) Source: Step Two Designs

Many approaches to design

A site map is the most common output of high level design

Card sorting is the most common activity for IA

Crosses the border between research and design

Gets user input on categorisation of information, and labelling too

Other activities include brainstorms and parallel design

Image credits

Example of typical site map (top left)

Source: www.treith.com/ia_presentation/16sitemap.html

Mind map used as site map (bottom left)

Source: www.neuralmatters.com/SiteMap.aspx

Results of a card sorting session (right)

Source: Step Two Designs

Designing the travel site Existing knowledge: Travel content lends itself to a geographic categorisation scheme Want to “holiday” in Australia Not sure where What is there to do? Need to drive traffic to destination guides Home International vacations Domestic vacations Guides Packages Book now!

Designing the travel site Existing knowledge Categorisation schemes (eg alphabetical, chronological, geographical, by subject/topic) Travel content lends itself to geographic organisation Input from research Needs and behaviour of target audience Results of card sorting activities Business objectives and political drivers Draft information architecture Combine all the available information to come up with a design solution Have we got it “right”? We’ll get our chance to find out, later

Existing knowledge

Categorisation schemes (eg alphabetical, chronological, geographical, by subject/topic)

Travel content lends itself to geographic organisation

Input from research

Needs and behaviour of target audience

Results of card sorting activities

Business objectives and political drivers

Draft information architecture

Combine all the available information to come up with a design solution

Have we got it “right”? We’ll get our chance to find out, later

Low level design

Low level IA design activities Many approaches to design Wireframes are the most common Conventions also influence strongly Design patterns may also be useful Image credits Example of an intranet wireframe (left) Source: Step Two Designs Hand drawn wireframe (right) Source: www.gdoss.com/images/lmf_paper_prototype.gif

Many approaches to design

Wireframes are the most common

Conventions also influence strongly

Design patterns may also be useful

Image credits

Example of an intranet wireframe (left)

Source: Step Two Designs

Hand drawn wireframe (right)

Source: www.gdoss.com/images/lmf_paper_prototype.gif

Designing the travel site Logo Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. International vacations Guide 1 Guide 2 Guide 3 Guide 4 Domestic vacations Guide 5 Guide 6 Guide 7 Guide 8 Guides Packages Book now! Conventions: Users are used to search in the top right hand corner Want to “holiday” in Australia Not sure where What is there to do? Search Contact us Need to drive traffic to destination guides

Designing the travel site, part 2 Existing knowledge Web conventions (eg search box top left) Strengths and weaknesses of technology platform Input from research Needs and behaviour of target audience Results of design brainstorming Business objectives and political drivers Draft page layouts Combine all the available information to come up with a design solution Have we got it “right”? We’ll get our chance to find out, later

Existing knowledge

Web conventions (eg search box top left)

Strengths and weaknesses of technology platform

Input from research

Needs and behaviour of target audience

Results of design brainstorming

Business objectives and political drivers

Draft page layouts

Combine all the available information to come up with a design solution

Have we got it “right”? We’ll get our chance to find out, later

Research A general IA process Understand the audience and context Solve the problem at hand Design Test design against requirements Validate

Research

Validate Get feedback from users Put the design in some sort of form the user can see or interact with Use realistic tasks or scenarios to get them to ‘use’ the design This is where we find out if our design decisions are ‘right’ Revise and iterate Take on board the feedback you get and revise the design appropriately Go back and test again

Get feedback from users

Put the design in some sort of form the user can see or interact with

Use realistic tasks or scenarios to get them to ‘use’ the design

This is where we find out if our design decisions are ‘right’

Revise and iterate

Take on board the feedback you get and revise the design appropriately

Go back and test again

Validation techniques

Validation techniques Usability testing comes in many forms It doesn’t have to be big, expensive testing in a lab The key is that users are involved in the validation And that realistic tasks are used for testing Image credits Typical lab-based usability testing (left) Source: www.xperienceconsulting.com/eng/img/interior/labs-3.jpg Card based classification evaluation (top right) Source: Step Two Designs Heat map produced by eye tracking (bottom right) Source: www.intranetjournal.com/articles/200503/Heatmap.jpg

Usability testing comes in many forms

It doesn’t have to be big, expensive testing in a lab

The key is that users are involved in the validation

And that realistic tasks are used for testing

Image credits

Typical lab-based usability testing (left)

Source: www.xperienceconsulting.com/eng/img/interior/labs-3.jpg

Card based classification evaluation (top right)

Source: Step Two Designs

Heat map produced by eye tracking (bottom right)

Source: www.intranetjournal.com/articles/200503/Heatmap.jpg

Logo Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit. International vacations Guide 1 Guide 2 Guide 3 Guide 4 Domestic vacations Guide 5 Guide 6 Guide 7 Guide 8 Guides Packages Book now! Search Contact us Feedback from Mary “ Huh? I don’t see a list of places I can go on holiday. Where do I click?”

Feedback from Mary Paper prototyping early in the process Easily obtain feedback from users early in process Check the design decisions you are making Iterate and revise design if necessary Much easier than waiting until the end to find issues Image credits Paper prototyping for testing (left) Source: www.nngroup.com/reports/prototyping/prototype_tabs.jpg

Paper prototyping early in the process

Easily obtain feedback from users early in process

Check the design decisions you are making

Iterate and revise design if necessary

Much easier than waiting until the end to find issues

Image credits

Paper prototyping for testing (left)

Source: www.nngroup.com/reports/prototyping/prototype_tabs.jpg

Usability testing “ This is more like it! It gives me a list of places I can go to and I can get more information”

Usability testing High-fidelity testing Test a working mock-up or live beta site Get user feedback on the whole design, including high and low level IA and graphic design Make use of realistic tasks or scenarios Image credits Completed travel website Source: www.news.com.au/travel/australia/0,26063,,00.html

High-fidelity testing

Test a working mock-up or live beta site

Get user feedback on the whole design, including high and low level IA and graphic design

Make use of realistic tasks or scenarios

Image credits

Completed travel website

Source: www.news.com.au/travel/australia/0,26063,,00.html

A general IA process Research Understand the audience and context Solve the problem at hand Design Test design against requirements Validate

Research

IA in the broader process Strategy and scoping Visual design Build Launch

Often IA appears here… Strategy and scoping Visual design Build Launch

… or here Strategy and scoping Visual design Build Launch

Research But this is where it belongs Strategy and scoping Visual design Build Launch Design Validate

Research

IA in the broader process Scheduling IA activities Often IA is a fixed component at the start (or end) of a project IA should not be relegated to “usability testing” at the very end of the project; it’s too late then Nor should it be something theoretical done at the start (before the ‘real work’) and never heard of again Holistic IA IA activities are useful throughout the development cycle As user advocates, IA/UX expertise can assist with strategy and planning before thinking of a specific product Similarly, they can ensure design and build stick to the plan

Scheduling IA activities

Often IA is a fixed component at the start (or end) of a project

IA should not be relegated to “usability testing” at the very end of the project; it’s too late then

Nor should it be something theoretical done at the start (before the ‘real work’) and never heard of again

Holistic IA

IA activities are useful throughout the development cycle

As user advocates, IA/UX expertise can assist with strategy and planning before thinking of a specific product

Similarly, they can ensure design and build stick to the plan

IA and agile Agile development methodologies Design is shifted earlier in the project More iterative Taken the technical development world by storm Problems IA seen as rigid and pedantic And also costly and slow To fit into an agile environment IA needs to be: Flexible (both in terms of time and method) Quicker and less costly Better integrated into the process (and team) More guerrilla in approach; ad-hoc expertise when needed Leverage the iterative nature of agile development for more user contact/input

Agile development methodologies

Design is shifted earlier in the project

More iterative

Taken the technical development world by storm

Problems

IA seen as rigid and pedantic

And also costly and slow

To fit into an agile environment IA needs to be:

Flexible (both in terms of time and method)

Quicker and less costly

Better integrated into the process (and team)

More guerrilla in approach; ad-hoc expertise when needed

Leverage the iterative nature of agile development for more user contact/input

IA and the new web Web 2.0 and Rich Internet Applications (RIA) You will no doubt be familiar with these! Higher levels of interactivity Breaking away from the “page model” web Asynchronous communication with server Built using Flash, Flex, AJAX, Air, Silverlight, Java etc Difficulties for IA As with designers and developers, RIAs mean a big shift for IA Web IA finds this difficult More akin to software design than web design

Web 2.0 and Rich Internet Applications (RIA)

You will no doubt be familiar with these!

Higher levels of interactivity

Breaking away from the “page model” web

Asynchronous communication with server

Built using Flash, Flex, AJAX, Air, Silverlight, Java etc

Difficulties for IA

As with designers and developers, RIAs mean a big shift for IA

Web IA finds this difficult

More akin to software design than web design

Compare the IA for this…

IA for the page model Click a link go to a page This is the basic model of the web Typical of most websites, even in the age of Web 2.0 IA for this kind of interface is well understood Image credits Wikipedia page Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rich_Internet_application

Click a link go to a page

This is the basic model of the web

Typical of most websites, even in the age of Web 2.0

IA for this kind of interface is well understood

Image credits

Wikipedia page

Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rich_Internet_application

… with the IA for this…

IA for the interactive app More like a software application This is a new model of interaction Clickable, dragable, contextually aware UI controls IA for this kind of interface is not yet well understood And this is a relatively tame example Image credits Moo cards Source: www.moo.com/products/minicards.php

More like a software application

This is a new model of interaction

Clickable, dragable, contextually aware UI controls

IA for this kind of interface is not yet well understood

And this is a relatively tame example

Image credits

Moo cards

Source: www.moo.com/products/minicards.php

… or this

IA for the interactive app More like a software application Many different types of interaction: drag, drop, expand, layers, transitions… Not found in the page model web How would you wireframe this interface? And these are just simple examples Designers and developers—such as those at WebDU—are building cooler, more complex apps and sites all the time Image credits Etsy showcase Source: www.etsy.com/showcase.php

More like a software application

Many different types of interaction: drag, drop, expand, layers, transitions…

Not found in the page model web

How would you wireframe this interface?

And these are just simple examples

Designers and developers—such as those at WebDU—are building cooler, more complex apps and sites all the time

Image credits

Etsy showcase

Source: www.etsy.com/showcase.php

IA for RIAs “ Traditional” techniques may not work Particularly in terms of documentation (eg site map and wireframes) New ways of documenting and communicating IA are needed Methodologies may need to change also (eg fit in with agile) Less about strict IA and more about interaction design New techniques to consider User task flows, storyboards, early working prototypes Rapid iterative prototyping; see it working then refine it ‘ Wireflows’ and other hybrid forms of documentation

“ Traditional” techniques may not work

Particularly in terms of documentation (eg site map and wireframes)

New ways of documenting and communicating IA are needed

Methodologies may need to change also (eg fit in with agile)

Less about strict IA and more about interaction design

New techniques to consider

User task flows, storyboards, early working prototypes

Rapid iterative prototyping; see it working then refine it

‘ Wireflows’ and other hybrid forms of documentation

IA practice is catching up

IA practice is catching up The RIA issue has consumed the IA community New documentation and methodology have surfaced and are entering the ‘mainstream’ There is a shift towards, or merger with, interaction design There are some great examples of usable, well thought out web 2.0 sites and web apps But there will be a lag IA (and its synonyms) are relatively young disciplines Many practitioners come from information science, or more ‘linear’ schools of thought Some are finding that the rules have changed whilst they’re still learning the game Still a lot of work out there that is web 1.0 The new breed of IA will need to be more ‘parallel’, more interactive Image credits Example of a wireflow from UX methods trading cards (top left) Source: http://nform.ca/tradingcards/2008_19.jpg Wireframe storyboard (bottom left) Source: http://thinkingandmaking.com/entries/art/36/wireframe-storyboard.gif Task flow for an Ajax login component (right) Source: www.uxmatters.com/MT/archives/images/rias-figure%205.png

The RIA issue has consumed the IA community

New documentation and methodology have surfaced and are entering the ‘mainstream’

There is a shift towards, or merger with, interaction design

There are some great examples of usable, well thought out web 2.0 sites and web apps

But there will be a lag

IA (and its synonyms) are relatively young disciplines

Many practitioners come from information science, or more ‘linear’ schools of thought

Some are finding that the rules have changed whilst they’re still learning the game

Still a lot of work out there that is web 1.0

The new breed of IA will need to be more ‘parallel’, more interactive

Image credits

Example of a wireflow from UX methods trading cards (top left)

Source: http://nform.ca/tradingcards/2008_19.jpg

Wireframe storyboard (bottom left)

Source: http://thinkingandmaking.com/entries/art/36/wireframe-storyboard.gif

Task flow for an Ajax login component (right)

Source: www.uxmatters.com/MT/archives/images/rias-figure%205.png

Different, yet still the same We’re still talking about UCD Whilst IA needs to ensure it keeps up with advances in technology and industry trends, the same basic principles apply Research, design, validate It’s just a new way of applying the principles Web 2.0 is not an excuse for a free-for-all We don’t want a repeat of lavish and unusable interfaces from early 90s Be careful of the “if we build it they will come” mentality; websites and applications still need to have purpose and meet a well defined audience need

We’re still talking about UCD

Whilst IA needs to ensure it keeps up with advances in technology and industry trends, the same basic principles apply

Research, design, validate

It’s just a new way of applying the principles

Web 2.0 is not an excuse for a free-for-all

We don’t want a repeat of lavish and unusable interfaces from early 90s

Be careful of the “if we build it they will come” mentality; websites and applications still need to have purpose and meet a well defined audience need

What does this mean for you? Web developers and designers… Need to allow time for IA (and UCD in general) Can use IA to help improve what you create Should get involved in IA (or even start to specialise in it) Provide valuable input into IA; leverage your experience across many projects and scenarios Can be key drivers for IA in the development team Are well placed to set the standards and influence colleagues (as with web-standards) Should play well with others (IA and UX professionals :)

Web developers and designers…

Need to allow time for IA (and UCD in general)

Can use IA to help improve what you create

Should get involved in IA (or even start to specialise in it)

Provide valuable input into IA; leverage your experience across many projects and scenarios

Can be key drivers for IA in the development team

Are well placed to set the standards and influence colleagues (as with web-standards)

Should play well with others (IA and UX professionals :)

Tips For success in IA, remember… There are no simple answers, but there are simple techniques Solve each problem at the right stage of the project Designs should be useful, not just usable Iteratively sense-check your work with users Teamwork works best (little “d” design with a multidisciplinary team) Always use a ‘blended’ approach (aka triangulation)

For success in IA, remember…

There are no simple answers, but there are simple techniques

Solve each problem at the right stage of the project

Designs should be useful, not just usable

Iteratively sense-check your work with users

Teamwork works best (little “d” design with a multidisciplinary team)

Always use a ‘blended’ approach (aka triangulation)

Further reading For a good intro to all things IA related, try: Don’t Make Me Think by Steve Krug ISBN: 0789723107 The Elements of User Experience by Jesse James Garrett ISBN: 0735712026 The User Is Always Right by Steve Mulder & Ziv Yaar ISBN: 0321434536 Information Architecture for the World Wide Web by Louis Rosenfeld & Peter Morville ISBN: 0596000359 Boxes and Arrows www.boxesandarrows.com User Interface Engineering (UIE) www.uie.com

For a good intro to all things IA related, try:

Don’t Make Me Think by Steve Krug ISBN: 0789723107

The Elements of User Experience by Jesse James Garrett ISBN: 0735712026

The User Is Always Right by Steve Mulder & Ziv Yaar ISBN: 0321434536

Information Architecture for the World Wide Web by Louis Rosenfeld & Peter Morville ISBN: 0596000359

Boxes and Arrows www.boxesandarrows.com

User Interface Engineering (UIE) www.uie.com

Further reading For wise thoughts on design documentation, try: Sketching User Experiences by Bill Buxton ISBN: 0123740371 Communicating Design by Dan Brown ISBN: 0321392353 For the latest in IA for RIAs, try: Documenting the Design of Rich Internet Applications: A Visual Language for State by Richard F. Cecil www.uxmatters.com/MT/archives/000251.php The Guided Wireframe Narrative for Rich Internet Applications by Andres Zapata www.boxesandarrows.com/view/the_guided_wire

For wise thoughts on design documentation, try:

Sketching User Experiences by Bill Buxton ISBN: 0123740371

Communicating Design by Dan Brown ISBN: 0321392353

For the latest in IA for RIAs, try:

Documenting the Design of Rich Internet Applications: A Visual Language for State by Richard F. Cecil www.uxmatters.com/MT/archives/000251.php

The Guided Wireframe Narrative for Rich Internet Applications by Andres Zapata www.boxesandarrows.com/view/the_guided_wire

In summary IA is not something to be scared of! Designers and developers can use IA to deliver better results In its most basic form IA is all about structure, navigation and labelling But more broadly it is UCD, consisting of Research, Design, Validation Ultimately IA will mean different things in different situations It’s not something frivolous or stuck at the end of a project IA is just as important for RIAs and Web 2.0 (perhaps more so)

IA is not something to be scared of!

Designers and developers can use IA to deliver better results

In its most basic form IA is all about structure, navigation and labelling

But more broadly it is UCD, consisting of Research, Design, Validation

Ultimately IA will mean different things in different situations

It’s not something frivolous or stuck at the end of a project

IA is just as important for RIAs and Web 2.0 (perhaps more so)

Questions? Contact details Patrick Kennedy [email_address] www.gurtle.com/ppov/ All slides will be on SlideShare: www.slideshare.net/PatrickKennedy

Contact details

Patrick Kennedy

[email_address]

www.gurtle.com/ppov/

All slides will be on SlideShare: www.slideshare.net/PatrickKennedy

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I'm pleased to announce I'll be running another pre-conference workshop, this time it's Demystifying Information Architecture at OZCHI 2008 in sunny Cairns on
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Demystifying Doha by Ashraf M. Salama and Florian Wiedmann

Information and Cultural ... 'Demystifying Doha - On Architecture and Urbanism in an Emerging City' concludes by suggesting a framework for future ...
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Architecture Decisions: Demystifying Architecture

Architecture Decisions: Demystifying Architecture on ResearchGate, the professional network for scientists.
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Architecture Decisions: Demystifying Architecture

Architecture Decisions: Demystifying Architecture. ... Traditional approaches tend to rely on models to convey the majority of the architecture's information.
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Demystifying - definition of demystifying by The Free ...

Define demystifying. demystifying synonyms, ... I loved this book for demystifying assistive technology. ... This information should not be considered ...
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Architecture decisions: demystifying architecture

Architecture decisions: demystifying architecture ... We believe that a key to demystifying architecture products lies in the ... Profile Information.
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