data mining

67 %
33 %
Information about data mining
Education

Published on February 5, 2008

Author: Dionigi

Source: authorstream.com

Slide1:  Data Mining Introduction:  Introduction Finding interesting trends or pattern in large datasets Statistics: exploratory data analysis Artificial intelligence: knowledge discovery and machine learning Scalability with respect to data size An algorithm is scalable if the running time grows (linearly) in proportion to the dataset size, given the available system resources Introduction:  Introduction Finding interesting trends or pattern in large datasets SQL queries (based on the relational algebra) OLAP queries (higher-level query constructs – multidimensional data model) Data mining techniques Knowledge Discovery (KDD):  Knowledge Discovery (KDD) Data Selection Data Cleaning Data Mining Evaluation The Knowledge Discovery Process Identify the target dataset and relevant attributes Remove noise and outliers, transform field values to common units, generate new fields, bring the data into the relational schema Present the patterns in an understandable form to the end user (e.g., through visualization) Overview:  Overview Counting Co-occurrences Frequent Itemsets Iceberg Queries Mining for Rules Association Rules Sequential Rules Classification and Regression Tree-Structures Rules Clustering Similarity Search over Sequences Counting Co-Occurrences:  Counting Co-Occurrences A market basket is a collection of items purchased by a customer in a single customer transaction Identify items that are purchased together Example:  Example Transid custid date item qty 111 201 5/1/99 pen 2 111 201 5/1/99 ink 1 111 201 5/1/99 milk 3 111 201 5/1/99 juice 6 112 105 6/3/99 pen 1 112 105 6/3/99 ink 1 112 105 6/3/99 milk 1 113 106 5/10/99 pen 1 113 106 5/10/99 milk 1 114 201 6/1/99 pen 2 114 201 6/1/99 ink 2 114 201 6/1/99 juice 4 one transaction note that there is redundancy Observations of the form: in 75% of transactions both pen and ink are purchased together Frequent Itemsets:  Frequent Itemsets Itemset: a set of items Support of an itemset: the fraction of transactions in the database that contain all items in the itemset Example: Itemset {pen, ink} Support 75% Itemset {milk, juice} Support 25% Frequent Itemsets:  Frequent Itemsets Example: If minsup = 70%, Frequent Itemsets {pen}, {ink}, {milk}, {pen, ink}, {pen, milk} Frequent Itemsets: itemsets whose support is higher than a user specified minimum support called minsup Frequent Itemsets:  Frequent Itemsets An algorithm for identify (all) frequent itemsets? The a priory property: Every subset of a frequent itemset must also be a frequent itemset Frequent Itemsets:  Frequent Itemsets For each item, check if it is a frequent itemset k = 1 repeat for each new frequent itemset Ik with k items Generate all itemsets Ik+1 with k+1 items, Ik  Ik+1 Scan all transactions once and check if the generated k+1 itemsets are frequent k = k + 1 Until no new frequent itemsets are identified An algorithm for identifying frequent itemsets Frequent Itemsets:  Frequent Itemsets For each item, check if it is a frequent itemset k = 1 repeat for each new frequent itemset Ik with k items Generate all itemsets Ik+1 with k+1 items, Ik  Ik+1 whose subsets are ferquent itemsets Scan all transactions once and check if the generated k+1 itemsets are frequent k = k + 1 Until no new frequent itemsets are identified A refinement of the algorithm for identifying frequent itemsets Iceberg Queries:  Iceberg Queries Assume we want to find pairs of customers and items such that the customer has purchased the item at least 5 times select P.custid, P. item, sum(P.qty) from Purchases P group by P.custid, P.item having sum (P.qty) > 5 Execution plan for the query? The number of groups is very large but the answer to the query (the tip of the iceberg) is usually very small Iceberg Queries:  Iceberg Queries select R.A1, R.A2, …, R.Ak, agr(R.B) from Relation R group by R.A1, R.A2, …, R.Ak having agr(R.B) > = constant Iceberg query A priory property similar to the a priori property for the frequent itemsets? Iceberg Queries:  Iceberg Queries select P.custid, P. item, sum(P.qty) from Purchases P group by P.custid, P.item having sum (P.qty) > 5 select P.custid from Purchases P group by P.custid having sum (P.qty) > 5 select P.item from Purchases P group by P.item having sum (P.qty) > 5 Generate (custid, item) pairs only for custid from Q1 and item from Q2 Q1 Q2 Overview:  Overview Counting Co-occurences Frequent Itemsets Iceberg Queries Mining for Rules Association Rules Sequential Rules Classification and Regression Tree-Structures Rules Clustering Similarity Search over Sequences Association Rules:  Association Rules Example {pen}  {ink} If a pen is purchased in a transaction, it is likely that ink will also be purchased in the transaction In general: LHS  RHS Association Rules:  Association Rules LHS  RHS Support: support(LHS  RHS) The percentage of transactions that contain all of these items Confidence: support(LHS  RHS) / support(LHS) Is an indication of the strength of the rule P(RHS | LHS) An algorithm for finding all rules with minsum and minconf? Association Rules:  Association Rules An algorithm for finding all rules with minsup and minconf Step 1: Find all frequent itemsets with minsup Step 2: Generate all rules from step 1 For each frequent itemset I with support support(I) Divide I into LHSI and RHSI confidence = support(I) / support(LHSI) Step 2 Association Rules and ISA Hierarchies:  Association Rules and ISA Hierarchies An ISA hierarchy or category hierarchy upon the set of items: a transaction implicitly contains for each of its items all of the item’s ancestors Beverage Milk Juice Stationery Pen Ink Detect relationships between items at different levels of the hierarchy In general, the support of an itemset can only increase if an item is replaced by its ancestor Generalized Association Rules:  Generalized Association Rules More general: not just customer transactions e.g., Group tuples by custid Rule {pen}  {milk}: if a pen is purchased by a customer, it likely that milk will also be purchased by the customer Transid custid date item qty 111 201 5/1/99 pen 2 111 201 5/1/99 ink 1 111 201 5/1/99 milk 3 111 201 5/1/99 juice 6 112 105 6/3/99 pen 1 112 105 6/3/99 ink 1 112 105 6/3/99 milk 1 113 106 5/10/99 pen 1 113 106 5/10/99 milk 1 114 201 6/1/99 pen 2 114 201 6/1/99 ink 2 114 201 6/1/99 juice 4 Generalized Association Rules:  Generalized Association Rules Group tuples by date: Calendric market basket analysis A calendar is any group of dates; e.g., every first of the month Given a calendar, compute association rules over the set of tuples whose date field falls within the calendar Transid custid date item qty 111 201 5/1/99 pen 2 111 201 5/1/99 ink 1 111 201 5/1/99 milk 3 111 201 5/1/99 juice 6 112 105 6/3/99 pen 1 112 105 6/3/99 ink 1 112 105 6/3/99 milk 1 113 106 5/10/99 pen 1 113 106 5/10/99 milk 1 114 201 6/1/99 pen 2 114 201 6/1/99 ink 2 114 201 6/1/99 juice 4 Calendar: every first of the month Rule {pen}  {juice}: has support 100% Over the entire: 50% Rule {pen}  {milk}: has support 50% Over the entire: 75% Sequential Patterns:  Sequential Patterns Sequence of Itemsets: The sequence of itemsets purchased by the customer: Example custid 201: {pen, ink, milk, juice}, {pen, ink, juice} (ordered by date) A subsequence of a sequence of itemsets is obtained by deleting one or more itemsets and is also a sequence of itemsets Sequential Patterns:  Sequential Patterns A sequence {a1, a2, .., an} is contained in sequence S if S has a subsequence {bq, .., bm} such that ai  bi for 1  i  m Example {pen}, {ink, milk}, {pen, juice} is contained in {pen, ink}, {shirt}, {juice, ink, milk}, {juice, pen, milk} The order of items within each itemset does not matter but the order of itemsets does matter {pen}, {ink, milk}, {pen, juice} is not conatined in {pen, ink}, {shirt}, {juice, pen, milk}, {juice, milk, ink} Sequential Patterns:  Sequential Patterns The support for a sequence S of itemsets is the percentage of customer sequences of which S is a subsequence Identify all sequences that have a minimum support Overview:  Overview Counting Co-occurences Frequent Itemsets Iceberg Queries Mining for Rules Association Rules Sequential Rules Classification and Regression Tree-Structures Rules Clustering Similarity Search over Sequences Classification and Regression Rules:  Classification and Regression Rules InsuranceInfo(age: integer, cartype: string, highrisk: boolean) There is one attribute (highrisk) whose value we would like to predict: dependent attribute The other attributes are called the predictors General form of the types of rules we want to discover: P1(X1)  P2(X2)  …  Pk(Xk)  Y = c Classification and Regression Rules:  Classification and Regression Rules P1(X1)  P2(X2)  …  Pk(Xk)  Y = c Pi(Xi) are predicates Two types: numerical Pi(Xi) : li  Xi  hi categorical Pi(Xi) : Xi  {v1, …, vj} numerical dependent attribute regression rule categorical dependent attribute classification rule (16  age  25)  (cartype  {Sports, Truck})  highrisk = true Classification and Regression Rules:  Classification and Regression Rules P1(X1)  P2(X2)  …  Pk(Xk)  Y = c Support: The support for a condition C is the percentage of tuples that satisfy C. The support for a rule C1  C2 is the support of the condition C1  C2 Confidence Consider the tuples that satisfy condition C1. The confidence for a rule C1  C2 is the percentage of such tuples that also satisfy condition C2 Classification and Regression Rules:  Classification and Regression Rules Differ from association rules by considering continuous and categorical attributes, rather than one field that is set-valued Overview:  Overview Counting Co-occurences Frequent Itemsets Iceberg Queries Mining for Rules Association Rules Sequential Rules Classification and Regression Tree-Structures Rules Clustering Similarity Search over Sequences Tree-Structured Rules:  Tree-Structured Rules Classification or decision trees Regression trees Typically the tree itself is the output of data mining Easy to understand Efficient algorithms to construct them Decision Trees:  Decision Trees A graphical representation of a collection of classification rules. Given a data record, the tree directs the record from the root to a leaf. Internal nodes: labeled with a predictor attribute (called a splitting attribute) Outgoing edges: labeled with predicates that involve the splitting attribute of the node (splitting criterion) Leaf nodes: labeled with a value of a dependent attribute Decision Trees:  Decision Trees Example Age Car Type > 25 No <= 25 Sports, Truck Other Yes No (16  age  25)  (cartype  {Sports, Truck})  highrisk = true Construct classification rules from the paths from the root to the leaf: LHS conjuction of predicates; RHS the value of the leaf Decision Trees:  Decision Trees Constructed into two phases Phase 1: growth phase construct a vary large tree (e.g., leaf nodes for individual records in the database Phase 2: pruning phase Build the tree greedily top down: At the root node, examine the database and compute the locally best splitting criterion Partition the database into two parts Recurse on each child Decision Trees:  Decision Trees Input: node n partition D split selection method S Output: decision tree for D rooted at node n Top down Decision Tree Induction Schema BuildTree(node n, partition D, method S) Apply S to D to find the splitting criterion If (a good splitting criterion is found) create two children nodes n1 and n2 of n partition D into D1 and D2 BuildTree(n1, D1, S) Build Tree(n2, D2, S) Decision Trees:  Decision Trees Split selection method An algorithm that takes as input (part of) a relation and outputs the locally best spliting criterion Example: examine the attributes cartype and age, select one of them as a splitting attribute and then select the splitting predicates Decision Trees:  Decision Trees How can we construct decision trees when the input database is larger than main memory? Provide the split selection method with aggregated information about the database instead of loading the complete database into main memory We need aggregated information for each predictor attribute AVC set of the predictor attribute X at node n is the projection of n’s database partition onto X and the dependent attribute where counts of the individual values in the domain of the dependent attribute are aggregated Decision Trees:  Decision Trees age cartype highrisk 23 Sedan false 30 Sports false 36 Sedan false 25 Truck true 30 Sedan false 23 Truck true 30 Truck false 25 Sports true 18 Sedan false AVC set of the predictor attribute age at the root node select R.age, R.highrisk, count(*) from InsuranceInfo R group by R.age, R.highrisk AVC set of the predictor attribute cartype at the left child of the root node select R.cartype, R.highrisk, count(*) from InsuranceInfo R where R.age <=25 group by R.age, R.highrisk Decision Trees:  Decision Trees age cartype highrisk 23 Sedan false 30 Sports false 36 Sedan false 25 Truck true 30 Sedan false 23 Truck true 30 Truck false 25 Sports true 18 Sedan false AVC set of the predictor attribute age at the root node select R.age, R.highrisk, count(*) from InsuranceInfo R group by R.age, R.highrisk True False Sedan 0 4 Sports 1 1 Truck 2 1 Decision Trees:  Decision Trees Size of the AVC set? AVC group of a node n: the set of the AVC sets of all predictors attributes at node n Decision Trees:  Decision Trees Input: node n partition D split selection method S Output: decision tree for D rooted at node n Top down Decision Tree Induction Schema BuildTree(node n, partition D, method S) Make a scan over D and construct the AVC group of node n in memory Apply S to AVC group to find the splitting criterion If (a good splitting criterion is found) create two children nodes n1 and n2 of n partition D into D1 and D2 BuildTree(n1, D1, S) Build Tree(n2, D2, S) Overview:  Overview Counting Co-occurences Frequent Itemsets Iceberg Queries Mining for Rules Association Rules Sequential Rules Classification and Regression Tree-Structures Rules Clustering Similarity Search over Sequences Clustering:  Clustering Partition a set of records into groups (clusters) such that all records within a group are similar to each other and records that belong to two different groups are disimilar. Similarity between records measured computationally by a distance function. Clustering:  Clustering CustomerInfo(age: integer, salary:real) Age Salary 20 40 60 Visually identify three clusters - shape of clusters: spherical spheres Clustering:  Clustering The output of a clustering algorithm consists of a summarized representation of each cluster. Type of output depends on type and shape of clusters. For example if spherical clusters: center C (mean) and radius R: given a collection of records r1, r2, .., rn C =  ri R =  (ri - C) n Clustering:  Clustering Two types of clustering algorithms: Partitional clustering: partitions the data into k groups such that some criterion that evaluates the clustering quality is optimized Hierarchical clustering generates a sequence of partitions of the records. Starting with a partition in which each cluster consists of a single record, merges two partitions in each step Clustering:  Clustering Assumptions Large number of records, just one scan of them A limited amount of main memory The BIRCH algorithm: Two parameters k: main memory threshold: maximum number of clusters that can be maintained in memory e: initial threshold of the radius of each cluster. A cluster is compact if its radius is smaller than e. Always maintain in main memory k or fewer compact cluster summaries (Ci, Ri) (If this is no possible adjust e) Clustering:  Clustering Read a record r from the database Compute the distance of r and each of the existing cluster centers Let i be the cluster (index) such that the distance between r and Ci is the smallest Compute R’i assuming r is inserted in the ith cluster If R’i  e, insert r in the ith cluster recompute Ri and Ci else start a new cluster containing only r The BIRCH algorithm: Overview:  Overview Counting Co-occurences Frequent Itemsets Iceberg Queries Mining for Rules Association Rules Sequential Rules Classification and Regression Tree-Structures Rules Clustering Similarity Search over Sequences Similarity Search over Sequences:  Similarity Search over Sequences A user specifies a query sequence and wants to retrieve all data sequences that are similar to the query sequence Not exact matches A data sequence X is a sequence of numbers X = <x1, x2, .., xk> Also called a time series k length of the sequence A subsequence Z = <z1, z2, …, zj> is deleting from another sequence by deleting numbers from the front and back of the sequence Similarity Search over Sequences:  Similarity Search over Sequences Given two sequences X and Y we can define the distance of the two sequences as the Euclidean norm Given a user-specified query sequence and a threshold parameter e, retrieve all data sequences within e-distance to the query sequence Complete sequence matching (the query sequence and the sequence in the database have the same length) Subsequence matching (the query is shorter) Similarity Search over Sequences:  Similarity Search over Sequences Given a user-specified query sequence and a threshold parameter e, retrieve all data sequences within e-distance to the query sequence Brute-force method? Each data sequence and the query sequence of length k may be represented as a point in a k-dimensional space Construct a multidimensional index Non-exact matches? Query the index with a hyper-rectangle with side length 2-e and the query sentence as the center

Add a comment

Related presentations

Related pages

Data-Mining – Wikipedia

Data-Mining ist der eigentliche Analyseschritt des Knowledge Discovery in Databases Prozesses. Die Schritte des iterativen Prozesses sind grob umrissen: ...
Read more

Definition » Data Mining « | Gabler Wirtschaftslexikon

Data Mining: Unter Data Mining versteht man die Anwendung von Methoden und Algorithmen zur möglichst automatischen Extraktion empirischer Zusammenhänge ...
Read more

Data Mining Techniques - Statistics Textbook

Data Mining. Data Mining is an analytic process designed to explore data (usually large amounts of data - typically business or market related - also known ...
Read more

Data mining - Wikipedia

Data mining can unintentionally be misused, and can then produce results which appear to be significant; but which do not actually predict future behaviour ...
Read more

Data Mining: What is Data Mining? - UCLA Anderson School ...

Generally, data mining (sometimes called data or knowledge discovery) is the process of analyzing data from different perspectives and summarizing it into ...
Read more

Grundbegriffe des Data Mining aufbereitet für eine ...

Eine Analyse aus Kanada (Alpar, P, Data Mining im praktischen Einsatz, 2000, 8) zeigte zum Beispiel auf, dass Babywindeln und Bier häufig zusammen gekauft
Read more

Data Mining | Coursera

Explore Data Mining Certificate offered by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Analyze Text, Discover Patterns, Visualize Data - Solve real-world ...
Read more

Data Mining (SSAS) - msdn.microsoft.com

Data Mining (auch als Predictive Analytics und Machine Learning bezeichnet) verwendet gut erforschte statistische Prinzipien für die Erkennung von Mustern ...
Read more

The Predictive Analytics Company - Dastani Consulting

Dastani Consulting ist Ihr Ansprechpartner für Predictive Analytics, Big Data, Customer Relationship Management und Business Intelligence.
Read more

dict.cc | data mining | Wörterbuch Englisch-Deutsch

Übersetzung für data mining im Englisch-Deutsch-Wörterbuch dict.cc.
Read more