CT_Symposium_2008_Iain_Murray_am

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Science-Technology

Published on December 4, 2008

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Slide 1: “Picture Your Audience” Barbara Lavallee, Anchorage, Alaska Slide 2: La Cloche Manitoulin Culinary Tourism Symposium Iain Murray University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada imurray@uoguelph.ca 27 September 2008 I: What we did in rural/northern Iceland II: Branding, packaging III: Culinary Tourists, Culinary Tourism, “Terroir” IV: Manitoulin Island and Culinary Tourism Slide 3: Culinary Tourism in Iceland Iain Murray University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada and Laufey Haraldsdóttir Hólar University College, Holar, Iceland “góðan daginn” Slide 4: The Premise… Travellers are not coming to Iceland for “culinary tourism”, (they come for the horses, hiking, scenery, whale-watching, rafting, geology…) but… We can increase regional economic activity by featuring “local things culinary” in the Skagafjörður Region. We can exceed expectations. Slide 5: “The Food Chest Skagafjorður” Slide 6: 100 years ago “Þorrablót” shark, whale, cod hangikjöt sheep head folaldakjöt puffin laufabrauð súrmjólk brennevin …smoked, salted, pickled, dried whatever-they-had Food in Iceland Today fish, seafood Arctic Charr Whale (some) lamb folaldakjöt dairy pylsa, burgers and fries coffee, brennevin, beer, water fresh tomatoes & cucs “The Food Chest Skagafjorður” : “The Food Chest Skagafjorður” The role of food in tourism; economic impact to the area; cooperation; branding Develop culinary tourism in a rural area in N. Iceland Slide 8: INCREASING ECONOMIC ACTIVITY inSKAGAFJÖRÐUR REGION Import Export Visitors/Tourists/Guests -domestic & international -focus on “culinary” tourism -multiplier / trickle down effect -restaurants, accommodations -attractions -services: -automotive -postal -airport -retail: -grocery -gasoline -souvenirs - clothing Product -producers/manufacturers -processors Slide 9: Accommodations Northern Iceland’s Tourism Web Tourists Restaurants Grocery Retail Food Processors Food Producers Recreation Horses Rafting Culture Golf Hiking Back Country Whale Watching Fishing fishing sheep cattle horses dairy fish/seafood “cottage” “The Food Chest Skagafjorður” : “The Food Chest Skagafjorður” The Issues: -leadership (“champion”) -cooperation -critical mass -cluster formation -supply chain -trust The Players: -farmers/producers -manufacturers -processors -restaurateurs -accommodations -attractions -retailers -artisans -Hólaskóli -Skagafjörður Slide 11: What we did… questionnaire to domestic and international tourists restaurateurs grocery retail accommodation providers producers and processors Images to help brand the region Some results…  I am interested in the local cusine in the places I visit (N=505) N %strongly agree 200 40somewhat agree 176 35highest among univ educated, females, and age 37-46; strong across all nationalities :  I am interested in the local cusine in the places I visit (N=505) N %strongly agree 200 40somewhat agree 176 35highest among univ educated, females, and age 37-46; strong across all nationalities Slide 13:  I am inclined to look for locally made food products in the grocery stores (N=505) N %strongly agree 125 25somewhat agree 172 34 highest among univ educated, females, age 37-46; strong across all nationalities except Icelanders  I usually purchase some non-perisable food/beverage items to take home with me (N=503) N %strongly agree 78 16somewhat agree 123 25highest among univ educated, females, age 37-46; strong across all nationalities except Icelanders :  I usually purchase some non-perisable food/beverage items to take home with me (N=503) N %strongly agree 78 16somewhat agree 123 25highest among univ educated, females, age 37-46; strong across all nationalities except Icelanders I appreciate having a restaurant waiter or waitress inform me about menu items that are specialties of the region. (N = 502) N %strongly agree 240 48somewhat agree 169 34highest among univ educated, females, age 37-46; very strong across all nationalities : I appreciate having a restaurant waiter or waitress inform me about menu items that are specialties of the region. (N = 502) N %strongly agree 240 48somewhat agree 169 34highest among univ educated, females, age 37-46; very strong across all nationalities In a restaurant, I like to try foods that are made from local products (N = 503) N %strongly agree 264 53somewhat agree 162 32highest among univ educated, females, age 37-46; very strong across all nationalities : In a restaurant, I like to try foods that are made from local products (N = 503) N %strongly agree 264 53somewhat agree 162 32highest among univ educated, females, age 37-46; very strong across all nationalities Research of Dr. Darcy Dornan, UC-Davis, 2005 : Research of Dr. Darcy Dornan, UC-Davis, 2005 The importance of food to vacation experience, stay-over tourists, 2001 (U.S.A.) degree of importance % of stay-over tourists extremely important 35 quite important 44 somewhat important 15 little importance 5 no importance 8 (not part of the Iceland presentation) Slide 18: Status of food as an attraction (South Africa) key attraction 17% supportive attraction 37% minimal attraction 33% no attraction 12% Research of G.E. du Rand, and E. Heath, University of Pretoria, S. Africa (not part of the Iceland presentation) Slide 19: page from the menu of “Kaffikrókur BRASSERIE” Sauðarkrókur, Iceland Slide 20: Gufusoðin ysa með Rækjum 2270 og grænmeti Fresh Haddock gently steamed in its own juices, with shrimp and fresh vegetables Aðalréttir Main Courses Jökulhús Specialty Hólableikja með Rækjusósu og grænmeti Arctic Charr from Hólar, with shrimp sauce Delivered fresh three times a week from Hólar Hjaltadalur, this delicately flavoured fish is prepared by Chef Inga using only the freshest ingredients, including fresh shrimp from our Skagafjorður region. 2490 Lambasneiðar 2670 í krydduðum brauðraspi Lamb cutlet with paprika seasoned bread crumb crust This locally raised lamb ranges free for most of the year, and, as a result, will be sure to delight your senses. Jökulhus receives it fresh three times a week. This recipe was passed down to Chef Inga, from an original dating back to 1855. If you enjoy lamb, you will love this. Restaurant Menu Slide 21: Welcome to Skagafjörður Region We in Skagafjörður are very proud of our region and our way of life. Throughout this store, look for this sign and you will find products that are produced in Skagafjörður. We hope you will try them. We are confident that you will like them. Grocery Store Main Entrance Signage Slide 22: Skagafjörður Dairy Products Milchprodukte aus dem Skagafjörð These are among the best dairy products in the world, partly because our cattle range free for most of the year. Diese Milchprodukte gehören zu den Besten der Welt, unter anderem weil die Kühe zum größten Teil des Jahres freilaufend sind. We hope you will try them. We are confident that you will like them. Wir hoffen Sie probieren diese Produkte. Wir sind überzeugt davon, dass Sie sie mögen. Grocery Store Point-of-Sale Signage Slide 23: The Next Stages… packaging develop culinary retail culinary festival culinary trail culinary education (experiences for tourists) academic culinary tourism conference Slide 24: Packaging matters! Slide 27: Summary Champion, with longevity Cooperation, with trust Understanding; buy-in between operators Critical mass, to avoid “been there, done that” Authenticity, Honesty and, “The Story” Take-away (memories & tangibles) Exceed expectations Slide 28: “takk fyrir mig” Slide 29: What is Culinary Tourism? What (who) is a Culinary Tourist? “Terroir”? How local is local? What’s the story? FoodLink Waterloo Region : FoodLink Waterloo Region 86% support local farms 55% freshness (quality) 44% preserve local farmland 14% it’s less expensive 12% it’s safer Why residents buy from local farmers On the ground and the waters surrounding Manitoulin : On the ground and the waters surrounding Manitoulin Slide 33: have the food and drink focus permeate all marketing communications; quality needs to exist everywhere, from the butcher shop to the pub; start the journey to the out-islands on the ferry, and don’t have ill-informed people on the ferry! A few words of advice from Scotland’s culinary tourism experience… Photos from Manitoulin Island Tourism WEB Site Credit P.J. Kiley : Photos from Manitoulin Island Tourism WEB Site Credit P.J. Kiley Photos from Manitoulin Island Tourism WEB Site Credit by P.J. Kiley : Photos from Manitoulin Island Tourism WEB Site Credit by P.J. Kiley Slide 38: Be consistent, honest, and pervasive in using the “MoM” label. Consider using an enticing image for/with the MoM label. Conclusions : Conclusions Know (define) your market, then… Champion, with longevity Cooperation, with trust Understanding; buy-in between operators Build critical mass Authenticity, Honesty and, “The Story” Under promise & Over deliver (exceed expectations) Please, in using or quoting any of this presentation, cite where it came from. Thank-you. This Afternoon’s Session : This Afternoon’s Session Some ideas… Menu engineering; menu messaging What’s do-able for Manitoulin? Barriers LAMBAC’s questions Strategy development Comments from a Manitoulin visitor (Aug 2008) Flexible, YOUR session Slide 41: LAMBAC’s Questions Culinary tourism: what is it, why is it exciting, how can we make it profitable? How do you work the logistics (distribution system) to be efficient, effective and still profitable with $1.50/litre gas? Slide 42: What culinary tourism products can be started quickly and easily? What are the challenges; how are they overcome? Where is the profit? How do we make it easier for chefs to access foods that are in season? How do we encourage restaurant, resort, and B&B owners to extend using local food beyond normal tourist season? Slide 43: How can we support food producers through the challenges: rural, northern, weather, pests, lack of economies of scale, government policies…? Is there a role for someone between chefs and food producers (middleman), in culinary tourism? If so, what is their role? Slide 44: How can food producers partner successfully with restaurateurs? How can we overcome start-up challenges in culinary tourism? Developing culinary tourism opportunities in rural areas: how experiences from other areas can help Manitoulin LaCloche.

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