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Creating An Atmosphere Of Achievement[1]

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Information about Creating An Atmosphere Of Achievement[1]

Published on October 18, 2007

Author: castanlucy

Source: slideshare.net

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Adctivating Prior Knowledge

Creating an Atmosphere of Achievement By Ma. Lucy Castañón Ralph MACMILLAN

COOPERATIVE LEARNING According to Anna Uhl Chamot: In Cooperative Learning students work in heterogeneous groups on learning tasks that are structured so that all students share in the responsibility for completing the task.

According to Anna Uhl Chamot:

In Cooperative Learning students work in heterogeneous groups on learning tasks that are structured so that all students share in the responsibility for completing the task.

There are a number of models of Cooperative Learning, all provide multiple opportunities for students to engage in active practice of language and content. In Cooperative Learning, students of varying degrees of linguistic proficiency and content knowledge work in a group setting that fosters mutual learning rather than competitiveness.

There are a number of models of Cooperative Learning, all provide multiple opportunities for students to engage in active practice of language and content.

In Cooperative Learning, students of varying degrees of linguistic proficiency and content knowledge work in a group setting that fosters mutual learning rather than competitiveness.

Benefits of Cooperative Learning Additional practice with academic English. The use of the native language to draw on prior knowledge. The incorporation of content into ESL classes The opportunity for students to become more independent learners. Teachers who set up cooperative activities in which group members have differing levels of English proficiency make it possible for students to help each other understand and complete the task.

Additional practice with academic English.

The use of the native language to draw on prior knowledge.

The incorporation of content into ESL classes

The opportunity for students to become more independent learners.

Teachers who set up cooperative activities in which group members have differing levels of English proficiency make it possible for students to help each other understand and complete the task.

Guidelines for Organizing Cooperative Learning Explain to students why cooperation as a learning strategy is effective in developing a better understanding of new concepts and skills, and in providing opportunities to practice academic English.

Explain to students why cooperation as a learning strategy is effective in developing a better understanding of new concepts and skills, and in providing opportunities to practice academic English.

Teach the social skills students need to work effectively together through team-building cooperative activities in which students learn how to work cooperatively and how to value the talents of their heterogeneously-chosen team members.

Teach the social skills students need to work effectively together through team-building cooperative activities in which students learn how to work cooperatively and how to value the talents of their heterogeneously-chosen team members.

Organize heterogeneous teams consisting of students with a high and low amount of relevant background knowledge, and students with greater and lesser proficiency in English.

Organize heterogeneous teams consisting of students with a high and low amount of relevant background knowledge, and students with greater and lesser proficiency in English.

Structure cooperative learning activities so that the task can only be accomplished through group interaction. For example, students might have to pool individual information to develop a project or report, or students could have different responsibilities for completing a science experiment.

Structure cooperative learning activities so that the task can only be accomplished through group interaction. For example, students might have to pool individual information to develop a project or report, or students could have different responsibilities for completing a science experiment.

Assign a role to each group member. Give students role cards that describe their responsibilities, or make a poster of this information. Allow cooperative groups the freedom to develop their ideas and solve the problem(s) assigned. Act as a facilitator rather than as a teacher.

Assign a role to each group member. Give students role cards that describe their responsibilities, or make a poster of this information.

Allow cooperative groups the freedom to develop their ideas and solve the problem(s) assigned. Act as a facilitator rather than as a teacher.

For cooperative learning activities, give group recognition (or grades, depending on task) as well as individual recognition. Conduct debriefing discussions in which students evaluate how successful they were in working together. .

For cooperative learning activities, give group recognition (or grades, depending on task) as well as individual recognition.

Conduct debriefing discussions in which students evaluate how successful they were in working together.

.

Jigsaw Technique The cooperative learning strategy known as the "jigsaw" technique helps students create their own learning.

The cooperative learning strategy known as the "jigsaw" technique helps students create their own learning.

How it works Jigsaw is a group structure that can be used across all content areas. Teachers arrange students in groups. Each group member is assigned a different piece of information. Group members then join with members of other groups assigned the same piece of information, and research and/or share ideas about the information.

Jigsaw is a group structure that can be used across all content areas.

Teachers arrange students in groups.

Each group member is assigned a different piece of information.

Group members then join with members of other groups assigned the same piece of information, and research and/or share ideas about the information.

Students start with a home group. That group is responsible for learning an assigned portion of a task that is prescribed by the teacher. Then the teacher separates students into new groups -- jigsaw groups -- by assigning one member from each home group to a new group. If an activity begins with groups A, B, C, and D, the jigsaw groups have a member from A, B, C, and D. In the jigsaw groups, students share information and complete some sort of project or product.

Students start with a home group.

That group is responsible for learning an assigned portion of a task that is prescribed by the teacher.

Then the teacher separates students into new groups -- jigsaw groups -- by assigning one member from each home group to a new group.

If an activity begins with groups A, B, C, and D, the jigsaw groups have a member from A, B, C, and D.

In the jigsaw groups, students share information and complete some sort of project or product.

FAIRY TALE FUN - JIGSAW STYLE! Divide the class into five equal groups. Each group got one fairy tale to read. The stories are: "The Ugly Duckling, " "Snow White," "Hansel and Gretel," "Jack and the Beanstalk," "The Three Little Pigs."

Divide the class into five equal groups.

Each group got one fairy tale to read. The stories are:

"The Ugly Duckling,

" "Snow White,"

"Hansel and Gretel,"

"Jack and the Beanstalk,"

"The Three Little Pigs."

Each group is responsible for collecting the following information : Who are the characters in the story? Where does the story take place? What are the major events of the story? Are there any magical or supernatural events? If so, what are they?

Who are the characters in the story?

Where does the story take place?

What are the major events of the story?

Are there any magical or supernatural events? If so, what are they?

After the students read, discussed, and recorded the above information,split them into jigsaw groups. One person from each fairy tale assembled in a new group. In their new groups, students are each given three minutes to tell the other group members about the story they have read as well as the information they have collected.

After the students read, discussed, and recorded the above information,split them into jigsaw groups.

One person from each fairy tale assembled in a new group.

In their new groups, students are each given three minutes to tell the other group members about the story they have read as well as the information they have collected.

After that, the group has to create a poster and give a presentation that addresses two points: What do all five stories have in common? Using what you found in common, write your own definition for a fairy tale.

What do all five stories have in common?

Using what you found in common, write your own definition for a fairy tale.

Benefits of the Jigsaw Technique The students are the ones doing the work; they are making the meaning, so they are doing the learning," Since they know they are moving on to a new group where they are the only one with that piece of the information, they rarely sit back and let other group members do all the work

The students are the ones doing the work; they are making the meaning, so they are doing the learning,"

Since they know they are moving on to a new group where they are the only one with that piece of the information, they rarely sit back and let other group members do all the work

Encourages listening, engagement, and empathy by giving each member of the group an essential part to play in the academic activity. No student can succeed completely unless everyone works well together as a team. This "cooperation by design" facilitates interaction among all students in the class, leading them to value each other as contributors to their common task.

Encourages listening, engagement, and empathy by giving each member of the group an essential part to play in the academic activity.

No student can succeed completely unless everyone works well together as a team.

This "cooperation by design" facilitates interaction among all students in the class, leading them to value each other as contributors to their common task.

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