Creating a world class natural history museum

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Information about Creating a world class natural history museum
Business & Mgmt

Published on March 15, 2014

Author: GrahamMcManus

Source: slideshare.net

Description

This is an extract from a Business Plan developed for a Natural History Museum being developed in the Australian Outback. The museum has discovered some unique dinosaur species and is uncovering more every day.
The museum is being established to house the collection and is located in an iconic area of the Australian Outback (the home of Waltzing Matilda) and will showcase multiple aspects of Australia's rich natural history.

© 2012 Australian Age of Dinosaurs Ltd | Creating a world class natural history museum for all Australians | 2012 Creating a world class natural history museum for all Australians Contact Australian Age of Dinosaurs Limited PO Box 408, WINTON, QLD, 4735 Australia T +61 7 4657 0078 F +61 7 4657 0045 E info@aaod.com.au W www.australianageofdinosaurs.com Banjo (Australovenator wintonensis) – A meat eating dinosaur unique to Australia.

© 2012 Australian Age of Dinosaurs Ltd | Creating a world class natural history museum for all Australians | 2012 2 Contents Section Page 1. Who we are 3 2. What we are doing 8 3. Why it makes sense 13 4. How you can help 17 Appendices Page A. Summary of Business Plan 19

© 2012 Australian Age of Dinosaurs Ltd | Creating a world class natural history museum for all Australians | 2012 Section 1 Who we are 01. Who we are 02. What we are doing 03. Why it makes sense 04. How you can help

© 2012 Australian Age of Dinosaurs Ltd | Creating a world class natural history museum for all Australians | 2012 4 The story so far … Who we are  An accidental but significant fossil discovery by Winton grazier David Elliott and his wife Judy, ignited the interest of a passionate group of Australians. They became focussed on learning more about this key feature of their region and a relatively unknown part of our country’s unique natural history.  So at a public meeting in 2002, with no premises or funding, but the support of the local community and Queensland Museum, The Australian Age of Dinosaurs organisation was formed.  Initially the group started to organise digs in the district and further significant finds resulted. An annual journal was published and resources were assembled to prepare and scientifically classify the fossil discoveries. This ultimately resulted in what have been recognised internationally as uniquely Australian and scientifically significant species of dinosaurs.  It became clear that the surrounding geological area know as the Winton Formation contained a rich resource of undiscovered dinosaur fossils.  Federal and state funding was then secured and a picturesque site generously donated. This site and funding were used to build the supporting infrastructure and initial stages of a world class museum. The museum would showcase and continue the discovery of this element of Australia’s unique natural history.  Stage 1 has now been operational for almost 2 years, providing temporary display and fossil preparation facilities. Stage 2, the main museum’s reception and administration centre is under construction and due to open in the second quarter of 2012. AAODL has rapidly evolved from a small organisation passionate about Australian dinosaurs to a sophisticated organisation focussed on creating a world class showcase for Australian Natural History. Founders David & Judy Elliott Dinosaur digs – where AAODL uncovers new dinosaur fossils. Matilda (Diamantinasaurus matildae) – one of the initial dinosaur discoveries Banjo (Australovenator wintonensis) – A meat eating dinosaur unique to Australia. View from the “Jump-up” – a mesa formation and the site for the Australian Age of Dinosaurs Museum of Natural History. A tour underway in the Stage 1 temporary display facility. Dinosaur bones being prepared. The Stage 2 Museum Reception and Administration facility under construction. 2002 - 2007 2008 - 2010 2011 - 2013 2014 - 2020 Start-up Initial discoveries & digs in conjunction with Qld Museum, fossil preparation at founder's home. Stage 1 Construct basic infrastructure & operate temporary visitor facilities from Preparation Shed. Stage 2 Construct & operate from Reception & Admin Centre for main museum Stage 3 Roll-out of main museum complex, with full display, education, and research facilities

© 2012 Australian Age of Dinosaurs Ltd | Creating a world class natural history museum for all Australians | 2012 5 The opportunity – a world class dinosaur resource Dinosaur Cove Victoria Strzeleki Group Victoria Lark Quarry Queensland Winton Queensland Richmond Queensland Muttaburra Queensland Eromanga Queensland Roma Queensland Lighting Ridge NSW Coober Pedy SA Broome WA Western Queensland is at the epicentre of dinosaur discoveries in Australia and appears to have the greatest potential for further discoveries. It is therefore logical to position a significant Dinosaur Museum and research facility in this region. Highlights of Australia’s dinosaur discovery timeline  1920’s – Richmond – Fossilised remains of a number of giant marine reptiles.  1924 – Roma – Individual sauropod fossil remains.  1963 – Muttaburra – Ornithopod fossil (Muttaburrasaurus).  1964 – Roma – Fossilised remains of an ankylosaur.  1970's – Winton – discovery of Clancy (Wintonotitan wattsi)  1989 – Richmond – almost complete fossil of a small plant eating ankylosaur.  2001 – Winton – discovery of Elliott and several other sauropods  2003 – Winton – donation to AAOD of Mick, an as yet undescribed brachiosaur  2004 – Eromanga – discovery of Cooper and George, two large sauropods as yet unclassified  2005 – Winton – discovery of Wade, a new undescribed sauropod  2006 – Winton – discovery of Matilda (Diamantinasaurus matildae) a sauropod and Banjo (Australovenator wintonensis) the most complete skeleton of a meat-eating dinosaur ever found in Australia.  2008 – Eromanga – discovery of Zac, an as yet undescribed sauropod.  2010 /11 – Winton – discovery of McKenzie and Dixie – two more sauropods Who we are Ancient Inland Sea Key features of the AAODL discoveries to date  AAODL operates an accredited collection under a custodian arrangement with the Queensland Museum.  The collection currently contains over 1,000 prepared items and a significant amount of unprepared materials from dig sites located throughout the Winton formation.  To date 3 new species have been scientifically described and each has significantly advanced the scientific understanding of this period in Australia's history.  A key feature of these discoveries has been the relatively complete skeletal remains that have been found. Prior to these discoveries much of what was known about Australian dinosaurs came from individual bones or bone fragments.  AAODL is currently preparing fossilised remains that are likely to result in the scientific description of further new species of Australian dinosaurs. Matilda (Diamantinasaurus matildae) Clancy (Wintonotitan wattsi) Banjo (Australovenator wintonensis) Locations of discoveries

© 2012 Australian Age of Dinosaurs Ltd | Creating a world class natural history museum for all Australians | 2012 6 The site Key features and development plans  AAODL has been fortunate enough to be gifted some 1,800 ha. of land 22km from the town of Winton.  The land includes a landform known as a mesa (or Jump-up) of spectacularly elevated land overlooking the plains of the Winton Formation (from where AAODL's fossil resource has been extracted).  The Stage 1 site is located nearest to the access roadway that climbs up the mesa from the highway some 11km away and facilitates entry to the plateau of elevated land where the main facilities will be located.  The Stage 2 Reception Centre site is located further across the plateau. It is envisaged that visitors will stop here to pay their entry fee and orientate themselves with the features of the site before heading across to the main (Stage 3) museum building.  The Stage 3 site has been selected for its large area of flat land for the larger stage 3 facilities and also for some of the unique landforms and features at the edge of mesa that will facilitate walkways through prehistoric-like landscapes.  There are also plans to use the features of the site to drive research and displays that educate visitors as to the biological evolution of the Australian continent and the unique aspects of our current day flora and fauna. Who we are The site chosen for the location of the museum is a geologically spectacular example of iconic Australian landscape, unchanged for millions of years, that will enable AAODL to bring the dinosaurs and other aspects of our natural history to life in the imaginations of visitors.

© 2012 Australian Age of Dinosaurs Ltd | Creating a world class natural history museum for all Australians | 2012 7 The organisation Who we are Overview  The main operations are conducted by the Australian Age of Dinosaurs Limited (AAODL), a not for profit company limited by guarantee. The founding members hold the guarantee obligations and the constitution ensures that there can be no distributions of assets.  AAODL is governed by a board made up of highly respected individuals who have expertise across many fields including marketing, project management; collection management, education and business finance.  AAODL owns and is responsible for the development and maintenance of the museum assets including the 1,800 hectare Museum site.  AAODL also conducts the museum operations encompassing all commercial and scientific activities.  AAODL maintains and develops its fossil collection under a strict Collection Development Management Policy consistent with Australian National Museums Standards and audited by the Queensland Museum on an annual basis. AAODL is in the process of developing an Accreditation Agreement for Custodianship and also Significant Palaeonotological and Geological Collections with the Queensland Museum and this ensures that the collection is protected in perpetuity for the benefit of all Queenslanders.  The Australian Age of Dinosaurs Society is the museum's membership entity and it takes responsibility for promotion, support and fundraising activities. Individuals and organisations can become members of the Society and this entitles them to a subscription to the Society's annual journal and other benefits such as discounted admission to the museum. AAODL is appropriately structured and governed to conduct the operations of the organisation, take custodianship of the fossil collection and promote the development of a world class natural history museum. Summary of Structure Board of Directors1 Publishes Journal, manages the gift fund. Australian Age of Dinosaurs Limited Company limited by Guarantee Income Tax Exempt Charity Deductible Gift Recipient General Members Queensland Museum Promotion, Support and Fundraising Australian Age of Dinosaurs Society Unincorporated Association Founding Members Ownership, development & maintenance of assets Museum Operations AAODL Natural History Collection Jump-up site, buildings, equipment & site improvements. Employs staff, contracts with suppliers & customers. Acquisition, maintenance and ownership of fossil collection.. Notes: 1. Current Directors of the Board are: David Elliott (Chairman) – Grazier, Founder of AAODL, Qld Museum Medallist , Conservationist of the Year 2006 Bruce Collins – Grazier / businessman, former Mayor of Winton Shire, Chairman of Waltzing Matilda Centre Bill Wavish – Retail Executive / Chartered Accountant, former Executive Chairman of Myer, former CFO of .Woolworths Carol Trewick – Finance Professional / CPA, held senior finance and administration positions at several large companies Dr Scott Hocknull – Palaeontologist, Senior Curator Geosciences at Queensland Museum, Young Australian of the Year 2002 Alisa Leacy – Educator, Principal Longreach State High School, Board Member Australian College of Outback Tourism Edward Warren – Licensed Real Estate Agent, Current Mayor Winton Shire Council, Chairman of RAPAD

© 2012 Australian Age of Dinosaurs Ltd | Creating a world class natural history museum for all Australians | 2012 Section 2 What we are doing 01. Who we are 02. What we are doing 03. Why it makes sense 04. How you can help

© 2012 Australian Age of Dinosaurs Ltd | Creating a world class natural history museum for all Australians | 2012 99 The plan 9 Vision A world class natural history museum for all Australians Innovation & Growth • New techniques to extract, prepare & present fossils. • Computer models / simulations Key Activities • Establish collection • Document new Australian species of Dinosaurs • Cement scientific credibility AAODL will focus on four key areas to achieve its vision. Each area will leverage AAODL's unique resources to optimise outcomes for all stakeholders. What we are doing Science Discover, innovate, publish and learn Education Enlighten, develop minds and give back Tourism Entertain, educate and enjoy Innovation & Growth • New approaches to display and interaction • Hands on, deep engagement with visitors. Key Activities • Establish world class facilities • Deliver quality experience • Package & sell the experience Innovation & Growth • On-line classes, displays and delivery of content Key Activities • School tours & travelling exhibits / programs • University field station, course delivery Community Enrich, expand and develop Innovation & Growth • Use of blogs and social media to communicate and build the community interest in AAODL Key Activities • Engagement with local community groups • Gaining philanthropic support, development of donor base

© 2012 Australian Age of Dinosaurs Ltd | Creating a world class natural history museum for all Australians | 2012 10 Our offerings What we are doing AAODL has a broad range of offerings focussed on accelerating the discovery, development, knowledge and understanding of unique aspects of Australia's rich cultural heritage.  AAODL's entry level product provides visitors with an overview of the fossil recovery process and highlights the key elements of the display collection.  It extends this base experience with the Prep-a-Dino program. This immerses visitors in the process of preparing fossils and also assists in processing its discoveries more rapidly than it could with paid staff.  It also offers a Dinosaur Discovery Week product where visitors participate in a real fossil dig supervised by trained palaeontologists.  AAODL offers a school excursion program to primary and secondary school students.  When the facility reaches stage 3 AAODL plans to offer a number of programs targeting university (undergraduate and post graduate) and scientific field research projects. These would be offered on-site or in conjunction with a education partners.  AAODL has built a strong following via the publication of an award winning journal and a strong and growing base of members.  It engages directly with the local community and cultural organisations and offers its facilities for functions and gatherings  It also reaches out beyond the immediate region with events in major city locations. Key activities  AAODL operates an accredited collection that contains over 1,000 prepared items and a significant amount of unprepared materials sourced from local sites.  The organisation is currently collaborating with a number of palaeontologists and academics to advance research projects related to AAODL's discoveries.  AAODL has a focussed team preparing fossilised remains that are likely to result in the scientific description of further new species of Australian dinosaurs. Science Facilitating / publishing research and access to the collection. Tourism Facility tours/admission, immersive preparation & dino dig experiences. Education School excursions, Uni field trips, travelling and on-site courses. Community Membership, journals, access to facilities for events.

© 2012 Australian Age of Dinosaurs Ltd | Creating a world class natural history museum for all Australians | 2012 11 Our customers and stakeholders What we are doing AAODL clearly understands its customers and stakeholders and is focussed on engaging with them in a way that adds value and provides tangible returns for the support that they provide. Science Academia, collectors / enthusiasts and other museums. Tourism Short stay travellers, grey nomads and international visitors. Education Primary and secondary schools and universities. Community Members, volunteers, corporate benefactors, local community groups.  Outback Queensland is an established part of the itineraries for grey nomads and is growing in popularity with short stay and international visitors.  A critical ingredient in maintaining and accelerating this growth is the development of world class attractions and unique visitor experiences.  While it is developing its facilities, AAODL has focussed on providing hands-on, immersive experiences for all types of visitors.  Studies has shown that children are fascinated with dinosaurs and including them as content in learning experiences deepens the level of student engagement and helps enhance study skills.  Primary and secondary schools already visit AAODL and as facilities develop it hopes to engage with universities also.  The community values places and facilities that draw attention to the region and allow them to showcase broader elements of what the community has to offer.  AAODL's discoveries attract significant attention and provide profile and recognition to those community and government bodies who have supported its development. Our engagement & value add  Just like the Kangaroo and Platypus are unique species to Australia, the rapidly growing AAODL collection is potentially a resource for the discovery of similarly unique ancient species.  Collectors and enthusiasts (or Dinophiles as they are known) are also excited to learn about and purchase replicas of the new species that AAODL is discovering.

© 2012 Australian Age of Dinosaurs Ltd | Creating a world class natural history museum for all Australians | 2012 12 Building the future – Stage 3 Museum concept Notes: These plans are conceptual only and may not reflect the final facility design or layout. Detailed planning will be undertaken to ensure that the final facility has a form and function consistent with a world class natural history museum. What we are doing

© 2012 Australian Age of Dinosaurs Ltd | Creating a world class natural history museum for all Australians | 2012 Section 3 Why it makes sense 01. Who we are 02. What we are doing 03. Why it makes sense 04. How you can help

© 2012 Australian Age of Dinosaurs Ltd | Creating a world class natural history museum for all Australians | 2012 14 Plans aligned to emulate other international benchmarks Why it makes sense In developing its plans AAODL has examined best practice international benchmarks and attempted to address the critical factors common across all highly successful museum operations. AAODL plans relative to Museum critical success factors  High quality resource / theme – AAODL has a high quality dinosaur fossil resource, albeit in its initial stages of development.  Visitor participation – a key factor in the design of all AAODL visitor experiences.  Memorable presence and exhibits / operationally efficient design – key objective of the Stage 3 facility design.  Kept fresh / renewed regularly – currently benefit from regular flow and strong pipeline of new / unique dinosaur discoveries.  Research and education alliances – strong relationship with Queensland Museum, international researchers and collaborations with Australian Universities.  Proximity to traveller / school markets – a key challenge for AAODL but can be viable by optimising access to existing outback visitors and will access broader markets via online initiatives and travelling displays / activities.  Volunteer / member support base – current membership roll of over 1,000 supporters and plan to continue to convert visitors into members / volunteers.  Clustered / linked with other attractions – cross promote with Lark Quarry, Matilda Centre and attractions in Longreach, Richmond, Hughenden and Eromanga.  Engaged with regional communities – work closely with and receive strong support from local council and community groups. Plan to expand relationships by using facilities for events and community gatherings.  Diverse revenue base (public & private) – key focus of financial plans is to develop multiple revenue streams across tourism, education, science and community / philanthropic support. Royal Tyrell Museum Remote location, strong scientific credibility  Located in the Canadian Badlands with the nearest town having a population of 8,000, it attracts over 400,000 visitors p.a.  One of the world’s largest dinosaurs displays.  Built in 1970’s to bolster local economy after collapse of coal mining industry.  Key driver of local economy. Chicago Field Museum Strong fundraising & corporate collaboration  Started with an endowment from retail magnate Marshall Fields.  Operates with limited government support due to well developed fundraising focus and alignment with commercial entities.  Purchased complete T-rex skeleton with support from corporate sponsors. Fukui Prefectural Dinosaur Museum Modern, high quality display infrastructure  A large, modern facility recognised as one of the world's great dinosaur museums.  State of the art displays and dioramas that use robotics to bring the dinosaurs to life.  Large, beamless display area. Other international benchmarks Zigong China, Munchehagen Germany  Zigong has benefitted from a rich resource with over 30 different genus of dinosaur discovered.  Munchehagen demonstrates how a large open site can be utilised to deliver an immersive dinosaur experience that has broad appeal.

© 2012 Australian Age of Dinosaurs Ltd | Creating a world class natural history museum for all Australians | 2012 15 Creating an outback tourism region with critical mass Lark Quarry Trackways Waltzing Matilda Centre Winton Int’l Coal Centre Blackwater Cosmos Centre Charleville Kronosaurus Korner Richmond Aust. Stockmans Hall of Fame Qantas Founders Museum Aust. Workers Heritage Centre Outback @ Isa / Riversleigh Nat’l Park Flinders Discovery Centre Hughenden Aust Age of Dinosaurs Queensland Dinosaur Trail Other major attractions AAODL is part of a developing network of quality attractions that for capture and preserve Australia’s cultural heritage. With investment the region will become a destination of national & international significance. Overview Outback Queensland is developing a critical mass of quality natural history and cultural museums and attractions Distribution of Outback Visitor Numbers Observations  The outback region of Australia in many ways epitomises the spirit of the Australian character.  People look to it for what makes us unique and take great pride in its stories of struggle and development and the rich and unique historical story it tells and represents.  The dinosaur part of this story is significant as it confirms that the uniqueness of our flora and fauna extends back millions of years.  Today people either purposefully travel to the region to see and experience this first hand or accidentally stumble across it on their way from one place to another.  As investment continues to improve the quality of the museums and attractions that encapsulate these experiences, the region has the potential to lift its profile and become a destination of national and international significance. 46 76 Mt Isa 95 54 66 Murweh 77 Emerald 134 Charters Towers 82 ~30 ~60 No. of Visitors p.a. ‘000 Why it makes sense

© 2012 Australian Age of Dinosaurs Ltd | Creating a world class natural history museum for all Australians | 2012 16 Social, cultural, educational and other community benefits Societal Impact  Societal impacts include increases in local, regional and international tourism, changes in community leisure activities, youth / indigenous employment, establishment of community partnerships, volunteer schemes, engagement with local clubs & societies and changes in infrastructure such as roads & transport.  In societal terms AAODL plans to make its facility an iconic focal point for the local community. A place where the community gathers to celebrate local events and drive initiatives to improve the quality of life. Youth and indigenous employment are already features of AAODL’s current operations and an area that the organisation plans to continue to focus on. Environmental Impact  Potential environmental impacts outside of the footprint of the facility on the local environment include changes in behaviours due to increased awareness of the uniqueness of our flora and fauna.  A key objective of the stage 3 design is to create a facility that has low environmental impact and as a result is efficient and economic to operate. Design features that utilise natural light & ventilation to minimise power consumption are a high priority. Economic Impact  Increasing visitor numbers provides the economic justification for investment in both public and private infrastructure to service their needs. Our projections suggest incremental expenditure of $5m p.a. and employment for approximately 60 people will flow from the full achievement of our stage 3 plans.  Finally AAODL's discoveries are scientifically very significant. The species being discovered have been lost to science for millions of years and without this project will remain undiscovered. The AAODL project will generate a broad range of positive personal, societal, environmental and economic impacts that provide considerable justification and support for the planned development expenditure. Model for Museum / Science Centre Impact1 Sources: 1. Adapted from Garnett R (2002). The Impact of Science Centers / Museums on Their Surrounding Communities.. Public Funding Staff & Volunteers Corporate / Individual Donations INPUTS OUTPUTS IMPACTS Museum / Science Centre Vision Mission Strategic Plan Corporate Culture Exhibits Exhibitions Educational Programs Scientific Discoveries Publications Replicas / Merchandise Website / Media Personal Impact Societal Impact Environmental Impact Economic Impact Overview  It is generally accepted that museums and science centres drive a broad range of community and broader societal impacts that are significant and form part of the justification for their support. Personal Impact  These benefits include personal impacts such as the enjoyment of the experience, learning and knowledge gained and the change in their attitudes to science, history and potentially their career choices and personal interest.  At this level AAODL’s focus on immersive, hands-on experiences (as opposed to just exhibits) is part of a strategy to connect with visitors at a level that ignites their passion for natural history and engenders a sense of pride in the uniqueness and special features of our past and present natural flora and fauna.  Economic impacts extend to goods, services and employment of the facility itself &the incremental expenditure of visitors, staff and suppliers in the local economy. Why it makes sense

© 2012 Australian Age of Dinosaurs Ltd | Creating a world class natural history museum for all Australians | 2012 Section 4 How you can help 01. Who we are 02. What we are doing 03. Why it makes sense 04. How you can help

© 2012 Australian Age of Dinosaurs Ltd | Creating a world class natural history museum for all Australians | 2012 18 How you can help How you can help Our vision is to create a world class natural history museum. We are passionate and committed and look to work with live minded individuals to make this vision a reality. Science Collaborate with us to expand our collective knowledge of this period in our history Tourism Visit us (in person or on the web) and enjoy / take an interest in what we are discovering about Australia's unique natural history Education Include us in your learning experiences and consider working with us to leverage this unique resource Community Support us and work with us to showcase what is unique about this part of our national heritage David Elliott AAODL Chairman  For more information contact

© 2012 Australian Age of Dinosaurs Ltd | Creating a world class natural history museum for all Australians | 2012 Appendices A. Summary of Business Plan

© 2012 Australian Age of Dinosaurs Ltd | Creating a world class natural history museum for all Australians | 2012 20 Plan summary Vision - A world class natural history museum for all Australians Strategic Focus SCIENCE TOURISM EDUCATION COMMUNITY Catch Cry Discover, innovate, publish and learn Entertain, educate and enjoy Enlighten, develop minds and give back Enrich, expand and develop opportunities for all Key Activities  Establish collection  Document new Australian species of Dinosaurs  Cement scientific credibility  Establish world class facilities  Deliver quality experience  Package & sell to local and international markets.  School tours & travelling exhibits / programs  University field station, course delivery  Engagement with local community groups  Gaining philanthropic support, development of donor base Key Objectives Sales & Marketing  Discover new dinosaurs that contribute to scientific knowledge and enhance AAODL's credibility and profile, locally, nationally and internationally.  Create and deliver memorable experiences that attract, entertain and educate a broad range of visitors on our rich natural history.  Ignite the interest of young Australians in their natural history via engaging experiences and broad delivery of educative content in multiple media.  Make a positive and lasting contribution to all aspects of our local and regional communities. Facility Development  Provide facilities for the research, documentation, processing and storage of AAODL scientific discoveries.  Develop a world class, internationally significant facility that provides an immersive experience, rich in entertainment, education and enjoyment to each & every visitor.  Develop a facility with spaces, resources and technology to educate and ignite the passion of Australians young and old to find out more about their unique natural history.  Develop a functional facility that is not only a source of pride but also a key community resource for bringing people together and celebrating our unique Australian culture and spirit. People & Operations  Attract and engage the right resources to bring unique and high quality scientific discoveries to market quickly and efficiently.  Assemble a team of passionate people to raise the profile of the organisation and deliver an entertaining, educative and enjoyable experience to all visitors.  Develop alliances, relationships and people with the scientific credibility and capability to educate Australians about their unique natural history.  Engage with and gain the support of the community and government for the operational development of the AAODL organisation. Measures of Success  Publications / mentions of AAODL species in scientific journals.  Online sales of replicas / models.  Speed of fossil processing.  Recognition of AAODL in scientific community.  Growth in visitor numbers.  Awareness of AAODL in key regional markets.  Successful launch of Stages 2 & 3.  Visitor feedback / satisfaction scores.  Student visitation numbers.  Alliances and relationships with key educational institutions / bodies.  University field trip numbers.  Education Courses delivered (on-site and online.  Membership numbers.  Government funding received.  Fundraising functions conducted.  Community use of facilities.  Impact on regional and state economy. Appendices

© 2012 Australian Age of Dinosaurs Ltd | Creating a world class natural history museum for all Australians | 2012 21 Sales & Marketing Plan Vision - A world class natural history museum for all Australians Strategic Focus SCIENCE TOURISM EDUCATION COMMUNITY Objective  Discover new dinosaurs that contribute to scientific knowledge and enhance AAODL's credibility and profile  Create and deliver memorable experiences that attract, entertain and educate a broad range of visitors on our rich natural history.  Ignite the interest of young Australians in their natural history via engaging experiences and broad delivery of educative content in multiple media.  Make a positive and lasting contribution to all aspects of our local and regional communities. Key Sales & Marketing Initiatives  Produce digital models and high quality replicas of key AAODL dinosaur species.  Actively market and promote focusing on internet channels, specialist blogs and dinophile publications.  Advance press opportunity and the publication process in relation to new species / discoveries under development.  Develop own / inclusion in commissionable packages for the short stay market.  Develop relationships with local caravan parks via lectures / support  Expand brochure and media penetration in regional markets.  Attend and support regional participation in travel shows.  Develop web booking capability for all key products.  Database of excursion co- ordinators and science teachers in regional schools.  Establish relationships with coach companies active in this segment.  Develop tour program and supporting materials / teacher kits – send to database contacts.  Allocate staff time to sales calls and business development.  Get Natural History (Dinosaur) topics firmly embedded into school curriculum.  Reinforce membership conversion skills with all customer facing staff.  Regular email newsletter.  Identify fundraising support resource in at least one key capital city market.  Develop structured corporate donor packages. Short Term Wins  High quality replicas available for sale.  New dinosaur publication.  Brochures / materials in all regional VIC, car clubs, other travel agents.  Caravan park programs for current peak season.  Initial focus on making contact with all schools within a 4 hour drive of Winton.  Fundraising resource in place. Measures of Success  Publications / mentions of AAODL species.  Online sales of replicas / models.  Growth in visitor numbers.  Awareness of AAODL in key regional markets.  Successful stage 2 launch  Contacts in database.  Student visitation numbers.  Membership numbers.  Government funding received.  Fundraising functions conducted. Appendices

© 2012 Australian Age of Dinosaurs Ltd | Creating a world class natural history museum for all Australians | 2012 22 Facility Development Plan Vision - A world class natural history museum for all Australians Strategic Focus SCIENCE TOURISM EDUCATION COMMUNITY Objective  Provide facilities for the research, documentation, processing and storage of AAODL scientific discoveries.  A world class, internationally significant facility that provides an immersive experience, rich in entertainment, education and enjoyment to each & every visitor.  A facility with spaces, resources and technology to educate and ignite the passion of Australians young and old to find out more about their unique natural history.  A functional facility that is not only a source of pride but also a key community resource for bringing people together and celebrating our unique Australian culture and spirit. Key facility development Initiatives  Connect with researchers and members of the scientific community to determine their current & future requirements.  Benchmark international best practice and capture learnings.  Ensure that the design maintains the current levels of broad based, hands on participation in the discovery & processing tasks.  Leverage relationships with international institutions to conduct a facility benchmarking tour to identify best practice and gain first hand advice from experienced museum operators.  Commence research into innovative indoor and outdoor display techniques and technologies.  Commence discussions with potential university collaboration partners to determine requirements and ability to support facility development.  Commence research into cost effective online and multi-media education delivery platforms and technologies.  Work with local civic and community group leaders to determine requirements and ability to support facility development.  Engagement at all levels of government to ensure buy-in and alignment with key policy objectives. Short Term Wins  Scientific facility requirements identified and documented.  Facility benchmarking tour conducted.  University partner agreement in place.  Strong input and support from community and government. Measures of Success  Capability of the new facility to speed up fossil processing activities.  Speed in bringing new discoveries to scientific community.  Replica production capability.  Growth in visitor numbers.  Level of positive visitor feedback / repeat visitation.  Awareness of AAODL's facility in global tourism markets.  Successful stage 3 launch  Student visitation numbers.  University field trip numbers.  Education Courses delivered (on- site and online)  Community support of and use of the AAODL Stage 3 facilities.  Government support for the facility. Appendices

© 2012 Australian Age of Dinosaurs Ltd | Creating a world class natural history museum for all Australians | 2012 23 People & Operations Plan Vision - A world class natural history museum for all Australians Strategic Focus SCIENCE TOURISM EDUCATION COMMUNITY Objective  Attract and engage the right resources to bring unique and high quality scientific discoveries to market quickly and efficiently.  Assemble a team of passionate people to raise the profile of the organisation and deliver an entertaining, educative and enjoyable experience to all visitors.  Leverage our scientific resources to educate and ignite the passion of Australians young and old to find out more about their unique natural history.  Engage with and gain the support of the community and government for the operational development of the AAODL organisation. Key People and Operations Initiatives  Prepare and scientifically classify at least two new dinosaurs / scientific discoveries each year.  Actively seek out further paleontological resources to support the discovery process.  Review fossil preparation techniques for possible productivity improvements.  Enhance and expand the tour program / range of experiences to correspond with the launch of the Stage 2 Reception Centre.  Develop / seek out appropriate customer service / tourism marketing training programs for key staff members.  Identify resource with tertiary qualifications to develop School Student tour materials that are academically robust and school science curriculum compliant.  Convert recent dinosaur discovery into case study for senior student review program.  Train staff in delivery of educational program to school groups.  Allocate staff time to working with community groups to increase AAODL profile and collaborate on mutually beneficial projects.  Identify resources to support the operation of the AAODL society and associated fundraising activities. Short Term Wins  Scientific classification / release of Wade.  Bio-dynamics paper on Banjo.  New tour programs ready for Stage 2 launch.  School tour program properly certified.  Increase in community engagement activities. Measures of Success  High profile discoveries / releases.  Profile / recognition of AAODL species and researchers in the scientific community.  Customer feedback / satisfaction survey scores.  Student visitation numbers.  Fundraising events conducted.  Extent of support from local community.  Funds raised by Society. Appendices

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