computer and animation

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Information about computer and animation
Education

Published on January 23, 2009

Author: maarzzb

Source: authorstream.com

GHANSHYAMDAS SARAF GIRLS COLLEGE : GHANSHYAMDAS SARAF GIRLS COLLEGE RAJASTHANI SAMMELAN’S ACKNOWLEDGEMENT : ACKNOWLEDGEMENT I would like to express my gratitude to all those who gave me the possibility to complete this thesis. I want to thank the Department of GHANSHYAMDAS SARAF GIRLS COLLEGE for giving us permission to commence this thesis in the first instance. I have furthermore to thank the COMPUTER PROF.TRUPTI SHAH who gave and confirmed this permission and encouraged us to go ahead with our thesis. I am bound to the Honorable co-members of my group for their stimulating support, suggestions and encouragement which helped me in all the time of research and for writing of this thesis. I am deeply indebted to all my former colleagues for looking closely at the final version of the thesis for English style and grammar, correcting both and offering suggestions for improvement. And finally, I would like to thank every one of you for giving me a chance to present this project to your honorable personalities. COMPUTER AND ANIMATION : COMPUTER AND ANIMATION ANIMATION : ANIMATION GROUP MEMBERS : GROUP MEMBERS MARIUM (05) SABIHA DIVYA KINJAL ARCHANA ADITI KOMAL WELCOME TO COMPUTING WORLD! : WELCOME TO COMPUTING WORLD! WELCOME TO THE WONDERFUL WORLD OF COMPUTING! INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER : INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER We are living in an information age dependent upon digital information. Digital information is electronic information, the result of computer processing. Every type of job relies upon getting information, using it, managing it, and relaying information to others. Computers enable the efficient processing and storage of information. Do not think of a computer merely as the machine with the keyboard and the mouse, although that might be true for some types of computers. Embedded computers may be inside your household appliances, the VCR, the automobile, planes, trains, power plants, water purification plants, calculators, and even inside a few toys. These embedded computers are very small. They affect our lives each day. Why, even modern traffic lights operate with computers. They are all around us. Think of additional ways in which computers affect our lives each day. MEANING OF COMPUTER : MEANING OF COMPUTER A computer is a machine that manipulates data according to a list of instructions. For general public, the meaning of "computer" is "tool of representation and communication". "Computer" is an extension of "pencil and paper" and "telephone". To position "computer" as "computing machine" is almost equivalent to say that one should not use it. In fact, those computers brought into schools as "computing machines" are covered with dust in silent computer-rooms. Since "computer" is "tool of representation and communication", it cannot be stand-alone, that is, disconnected to communication-network. Stand-alone computers are similar to telephones disconnected to telephone-circuits. WHAT IS COMPUTER? : WHAT IS COMPUTER? A programmable machine. The two principal characteristics of a computer are: It responds to a specific set of instructions in a well-defined manner. It can execute a prerecorded list of instructions (a program). Modern computers are electronic and digital. The actual machinery -- wires, transistors, and circuits -- is called hardware; the instructions and data are called software. All general-purpose computers require the following hardware components: memory : Enables a computer to store, at least temporarily, data and programs. mass storage device : Allows a computer to permanently retain large amounts of data. Common mass storage devices include disk drives and tape drives. input device : Usually a keyboard and mouse, the input device is the conduit through which data and instructions enter a computer. output device : A display screen, printer, or other device that lets you see what the computer has accomplished. central processing unit (CPU): The heart of the computer, this is the component that actually executes instructions. FEATURES OF COMPUTER : FEATURES OF COMPUTER Storage: A computer can store maximum data in a proper way. Accuracy: the answer produced by computer is very accurate. No tiredness: Computer is not suffering from lack of concentration and tiredness. Speed of Computer: Computer can process the instructions with a very great speed and will display the accurate answer. Versatility: A computer can do any type of jobs i.e. related to science, engineering or any complicated or simple job. ADVANTAGES OF COMPUTERS : ADVANTAGES OF COMPUTERS Education Field: A computer is very useful in all the education fields. Business: A computer is very useful in doing day to day business work. Entertainment: With the help of computer, a person will be able to make animated movie, add special effects for the purpose of entertainment. Research: Computer is a device used for research work. DISADVANTAGES OF COMPUTER : DISADVANTAGES OF COMPUTER Totally based on Power: Computer is an electronic device which requires power. Unemployment: Computer generates unemployment. Required instructions for all steps: All the instructions has to be specified, only then it will display the answer. Doesn’t take its own decision: A computer cannot think and hence, cannot take its own decisions. OUR VIEW OF COMPUTERS : OUR VIEW OF COMPUTERS SWEET AND SIMPLE VIEW: A COMPUTER IS A USEFUL-CUM-USELESS THING ANIMATION : ANIMATION Animation is usually created by collaboration of many people working on just one part of this animation process. Some people will specialize in the animation, some in cleaning up the animation, some in painting the backgrounds or drawing the layouts, and some in just planning the scene so that all the elements come together correctly. COOL ANIMATION OF AN ALIEN SONG – I WILL SURVIVE : COOL ANIMATION OF AN ALIEN SONG – I WILL SURVIVE WHAT IS ANIMATION? : WHAT IS ANIMATION? Animation is the rapid display of a sequence of images of 2-D or 3-D artwork or model positions in order to create an illusion of movement. It is an optical illusion of motion due to the phenomenon of persistence of vision, and can be created and demonstrated in a number of ways. The most common method of presenting animation is as a motion picture or video program, although several other forms of presenting animation also exist. Animation can sometimes refer to a way of activating a community, i.e. 'animating' the users. This means actions which encourages users to interact with a given service and is connected to moderation. TYPES OF ANIMATION : TYPES OF ANIMATION Frames and Motion: Virtually all visual animation media uses frames, which is a series of still images shown very rapidly to simulate motion or change. Anything you see on a computer, television, or movie screen is based on frames. Making frame by frame animations in Flash at a frame rate of 24 fps (frames per second) will keep people happy as they will accept those frames as a single movie. Anything slower than that rate and your animation would get choppy or jumpy breaking the illusion of the movie. Frames and Records: The whole concept of frames makes three things possible: storage, transmission and display. You cannot really store, transmit and display a man walking across a room, but you can store a picture or many pictures, store, transmit and then eventually display them almost anywhere. Programmed Frames: Using a computer helps you calculating things on the fly, so you don't really need a long list of descriptions for your frames. You may cut it down to a description of the first frame and some rules on how to build the subsequent frames. So the computer is not merely creating an image from a description, its creating the description first, then creating the image based on the description, and finally displaying the image. ANIMATING WITH CODEFRAME BY FRAME ANIMATION : ANIMATING WITH CODEFRAME BY FRAME ANIMATION Almost all coded animation is contained within some sort of loop. If you consider frame by frame animation and visualize it into a flowchart you will end up with something like this. ANIMATING WITH CODERENDERING AND THEN DISPLAYING FRAMES : ANIMATING WITH CODERENDERING AND THEN DISPLAYING FRAMES If you get into shapes or symbols then it would be a different story. Flash does not create and store a new bitmap image for each frame, even in a frame by frame animation movie. For each frame Flash stores the position, size, color and so on of an object on the stage. The flowchart for this sort of animation would be as follows: ANIMATING WITH CODESCRIPTED ANIMATION : ANIMATING WITH CODESCRIPTED ANIMATION Finally if you consider dynamic or coded animation the flowchart would look something like this: CONCLUSIONANIMATING WITH CODE : CONCLUSIONANIMATING WITH CODE In the last flowchart (Scripted Animation) there is no concept of frame 1, 2 etc, etc. Action scripted animation generally can run, and usually does occur all in just one frame. Here is where you can see the loop coming into play. It sounds very daunting but it really isn't if you study it carefully. First you set up an initial state by placing movie clips onto the stage or describe your animation or scene in action script only. Next you apply rules which results in a new state. Which rules and what sort of animation you want is entirely your decision! Whether you want users to interact with the animation or adding different events is also all up to you. By understanding some of the basic concepts in animation you should be well on your way to your own scripted animations. STEPS TO CREATE ANIMATIONThe Ruff : STEPS TO CREATE ANIMATIONThe Ruff THE RUFF       This first stage shows the background layout, the props and characters in relation to each other. From here, we can see changes to be made to the animation and we can identify the areas of the frame that are going to require special attention. In this case, our hero is in a hurry to get a torch and run down some stairs and into a dark tunnel. One special need of this scene is showing how the light from the torch will effect the way the background and the character are lit throughout. Another special requirement is when our hero enters through a doorway and exits through a tunnel, he should only show from behind a wall. To solve the problem of revealing a character (or hiding him), we are going to use mattes... STEPS TO CREATE ANIMATIONUsing Mattes : STEPS TO CREATE ANIMATIONUsing Mattes USING MATTES       A matte is a portion of the frame. It can be any shape or size. The matte is used to "cut" an image, or make a separate copy. Mattes can be laid back on top to replace those portions of the image so as to create the illusion of depth. In our case, the hero should look as if he runs in from behind a wall. The wall will actually be painted as part of the background image. If we made a copy of the wall area of the background, we can place that wall matte on top of the hero when he is supposed to appear behind it. This introduces the idea of using new layers to compose more complex illusions within the frame. By "cutting a matte" of the wall up at the top of the stairs and one for the tunnel on the very far right, we can have them placed over the character and the torch when they are supposed to appear behind them. When our hero runs down the stairs, however, the character layer should appear in front of that wall, so I will remove the wall matte after he enters scene. Now, we will tackle the next problem: how to show the light of the torch moving throughout the scene... STEPS TO CREATE ANIMATIONSpecial Effects : STEPS TO CREATE ANIMATIONSpecial Effects SPECIAL EFFECTS (EFX)       In this scene, the torch sits in place on the wall until it is snatched by our bounding hero. Then, the torch is carried down the stairs and into the tunnel. The background image includes the stairs, walls and the light from outside, but it cannot include the light from the torch. The light from the torch, like the fire on the torch, will have to be animated. We give the appearance of cast torchlight moving within the background by the use of new lighting effects layers. In new layers we can create the extra light cast by the torch. For this scene, I created four images of just the yellow torchlight as it would look as if it were cast by the torch in the four general areas the torch is in: 1) the top of the stairs, mounted to the wall, 2) about half way down the stairs, 3) at the bottom of the stairs, and 4) inside the tunnel. I can fade these four layers up and down in succession to give the illusion that the torchlight is moving. Contd: : Contd: I can also make the light flicker by fading the layers up and down a little throughout. After making this pass, I realized that one matte (the tunnel matte) is visible to us when the torchlight effects layer is on. Look at the end of the scene, just before he exits into the tunnel. The matte of that wall is over the character, torch and fire, however, it should not appear to be over the torchlight effect. It looks ugly. Now, if we place the torchlight layer over the matte, it will be over the character. Since we can't have the character covered over by the torchlight, we have a catch-22. But, I came up with a simple solution: I leave the tunnel matte off through the scene until the very end, when the torch (and the character) enters the tunnel. At that point, I turn on the matte while fading down the third torchlight layer drastically. It's not a perfect solution, but it looks better. Another solution would have been to create another layer of just the yellow torchlight cast on just that tunnel matte. Then, we would have to match the torchlight fade of two mattes when we shoot. STEPS TO CREATE ANIMATIONCleanup : STEPS TO CREATE ANIMATIONCleanup CLEANUP (CU)       Now that the biggest and most obvious problems of the scene have been solved, we can go back to the background image and paint it. This is where we can pay attention to the details and really paint a good looking scene. This means using good sense of color, texture, and lighting (but we will remember to omit the torchlight). And, after the background looks the way we want it, we will have to remember to "recut the mattes" from the new background image. I have also cleaned up the character animation and the torch animation as well. And I've added new color layers (one for each frame of character outline) and placed them under the character outline. By adding new layers instead of painting the outline layer to add the color of the character, I am able to go back and change the color without changing the outline. STEPS TO CREATE ANIMATIONFinal Scene : STEPS TO CREATE ANIMATIONFinal Scene FINAL SCENE       To finish up this scene, I'm going to touch up the lighting effects of the torchlight so that it shows the more of the wall texture is casts on. Next, I'm going to add tones, or shadows on the character's color layers, to show the effect of the torchlight on our hero's body as he runs through the scene. I've also painted the torch fire and cut a matte of the torch when our hero holds it in front of him (the rest of the time, the torch layer is under the character layer). Calling this final is really just saying, "I'm done working on it.". Because, we can always find more to do to the scene to help the illusion. We can retouch the background or the effects. We can add a new layer for the contact shadow: the shadow cast from the character onto the floor and walls of the scene. We could add a costume for our hero. We can add new characters or props. We could go on and on. The more steps you add to an animated film, the more you (and the audience) get out of it. STEPS TO A SIMPLE COMPUTER ANIMATION : STEPS TO A SIMPLE COMPUTER ANIMATION Creating animation sequences: Object definition Path specification Key-frames In-betweening Displaying the sequences Raster animation Color-table animation A LOVE STORY… : A LOVE STORY… Slide 31: Oh! I am so sorry Oh!! Slide 32: By the way, I am Eliz And I am Karin, nice to meet you Slide 33: Will you show me the path to library? I am lost.. Sure.. Why not?? Slide 34: Well, here’s the library.. Bye.. Thanks… bye.. Slide 35: Karin is so nice… I think I like him.. Slide 36: She is so sweet I think I like her.. NEXT DAY… : NEXT DAY… Slide 42: HIEE.. So we meet again.. I want to tell you something… Oh!! Even I want to tell you something… Uh.... You say first… No, no… you say…then I will say.. Slide 43: Well…uh.. Umm.. I… You.. I… YOU… I LOVE YOU… HEYYY!!!... That’s nice.. I LOVE YOU TOOO… THE END… : THE END… LIST OF MOVIES IN WHICH ANIMATION IS USED : LIST OF MOVIES IN WHICH ANIMATION IS USED FINDING NEMO ICEAGE WALT.E. TAARE ZAMEEN PAR LOVE STORY 2050 SHREK KUNG FU PANDA TOM AND JERRY FLINTSTONES HARRY POTTER THODA PYAAR, THODA MAGIC JURASSIC PARK THE INCREDIBLE DOREMON SHINCHAN FINDING NEMO… is filled to the gills with animation…. : FINDING NEMO… is filled to the gills with animation…. Finding Nemo is a 2003 computer-animated American family film. It was written by Andrew Stanton, directed by Stanton and Lee Unkrich and produced by Pixar Animation Studios and Walt Disney Pictures. It tells the story of the overly protective clownfish Marlin (Albert Brooks), who along with a regal tang called Dory (Ellen DeGeneres), searches for his son Nemo (Alexander Gould). Along the way he learns to takes risks and that his son is capable of taking care of himself. The film received overwhelmingly positive reviews and won the Academy Award for Best Animated Feature. It was a financial blockbuster as it grossed over $864 million worldwide.[1] It is the best-selling DVD of all time, with over 40 million copies sold as of 2006.[2] In 2008, the American Film Institute named it the 10th greatest American Animated film ever made during their 10 Top 10. [3] This film was rated G by the MPAA. IMPACT OF ANIMATIONIN FINDING NEMO : IMPACT OF ANIMATIONIN FINDING NEMO The thing that really gets me about Finding Nemo is the way that the fish were rendered. Pixar, almost in an undisputed stance, is on the edge of animation. The mere fact that this thing looks so perfect - like it was filmed in the ocean- is amazing. But I keep thinking about the way these fish looked and the way this look was used to further the story. Film critic god Gene Siskel once spoke of non-human characters relating to an audience. He said that it was in the eyes. The key to the souls in characters that aren't supposed to have souls. (Depending on one's religious faith, I suppose.) The expression of the eyes in this film are almost worth a point-specific viewing. I was initially worried about the choice of actors for the voices of the main character's in the film. They turned out to be appropriate choices - Brooks juicing up the nervousness, DeGeneres playing goofy sentiments, Dafoe talking like Robert Shaw pontificating about the U.S.S. Indianapolis- but the emotions going on in the eyes said everything. The way they lit up when they were happy, the way they shook in fear, the way they sagged when they were upset. The look met the tone perfectly. This shows that Pixar not only knows how to use a computer; they know how to make art. To me, this is the real marvel of Finding Nemo: Using technology to enhance the experience of watching character development instead of mere spectacle. And did I mention this film is pretty funny? Dory communicating with the whale is a riot and the sea gulls have this level of goofiness unmatched in animal caricatures since Gary Larson retired. It's enough to keep the audience smiling until something unsettling happens again THE INCREDIBLES : THE INCREDIBLES Mr. Incredible (A.K.A. Bob Parr), and his wife Helen (A.K.A. Elastigirl), are the world's greatest famous crime-fighting superheroes in Metro Ville. Always saving lives and battling evil on a daily basis. But fifteen years later, they have been forced to adopt civilian identities and retreat to the suburbs where they have no choice but to retire of being a superhero and force to live a "normal life" with their three children Violet, Dash and Jack-Jack (who were secretly born with superpowers). Itching to get back into action, Bob gets his chance when a mysterious communication summons him to a remote island for a top secret assignment. He soon discovers that it will take a super family effort to rescue the world from total destruction. THE INCREDIBLES ANIMATOR – VICTOR NAVONE : THE INCREDIBLES ANIMATOR – VICTOR NAVONE IMPACT OF ANIMATION IN THE INCREDIBLES : IMPACT OF ANIMATION IN THE INCREDIBLES This review of The Incredibles is unquestionably biased by our love of animation. We have lamented the recent decline in the offerings from Disney and reveled in the child-like optimism of the Pixar films. There's no other studio that comes close to capturing the innocence of the child's imagination. Totally guileless and endearing without being cloying or saccharine. "The Incredibles" is a wild romp through comic book lore with a sweet touch that will surely keep audiences coming back again and again. We thoroughly encourage everyone to go see this movie or buy the home video. One other thing we couldn't help but notice is the incredible marketing push that Disney and Pixar have put behind "The Incredibles." Not content with the simple, traditional advertising blitz that Disney used to mount for its animated features, Pixar has been actively promoting the film with co-marketing programs with Yahoo!/SBC DSL Services, Safeway Food Stores house brand products with "Incredibles" on the label, and a host of toys from Hasbro and Think way, games for Sony's Play station and the Microsoft X-Box, as well as the PC. If it wasn't for the election year ads and the sheer genius of this movie, we would be well and truly sick of seeing Mr. Incredible by now. TOM AND JERRY : TOM AND JERRY Tom and Jerry is a successful and long-running series of theatrical short subjects created by William Hanna and Joseph Barbara for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer that centered on a never-ending rivalry between a housecat (Tom) and a brown mouse (Jerry) whose chases and battles often involved comic violence. Hanna and Barbara ultimately wrote and directed one hundred and fourteen Tom and Jerry cartoons at the MGM cartoon studio in Hollywood, California between 1940 and 1957, when the animation unit was closed down. The original series is notable for having won the Academy Awards for Best Short Subject (Cartoons) seven times, tying it with Walt Disney's Silly Symphonies as the most-awarded theatrical animated series. Beginning in 1960, in addition to the originals MGM had new shorts produced by Rembrandt Films, led by Gene Deitch in Eastern Europe. Production of Tom and Jerry shorts returned to Hollywood under Chuck Jones' Sib-Tower 12 Productions in 1963; this series lasted until 1967, making it a total of 161 shorts. The cat and mouse stars later resurfaced in television cartoons produced by Hanna-Barbara and Filmation Studios during the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s, and a feature film, Tom and Jerry: The Movie, in 1993. Today, Warner Bros. (via its Turner Entertainment division) owns the rights to Tom and Jerry, and produces the series Tom and Jerry Tales for The CW's Saturday morning "Kids WB" lineup, as well as a string of Tom and Jerry direct-to-video films. IMPACT OF ANIMATION IN TOM AND JERRY : IMPACT OF ANIMATION IN TOM AND JERRY Tom and Jerry has used lots of animation in its making. The animated characters really makes a huge effort to grab the attention of all people. It was first created in the year 1965, it is still reviewed today in the same type of animation. There are no special effects given to the characters of this cartoon. The ability of Tom to shout, i.e. the animation effects given to the cat in the movie is something which has not changed in all the past years of the making, but still has the impact to grab the eyeballs of the viewers and make them laugh. The animation given to the mouse i.e. Jerry suites the character perfectly. Hannah-Barbara has done a perfect job of animation which continues even today without any extreme changes and still is able to survive in the rough competitions against other animated movies. SHREK : SHREK Shrek is a 2001 computer-animated American comedy film, directed by Andrew Adamson and Vicky Jenson, and starring the voices of Mike Myers, Eddie Murphy, Cameron Diaz, and John Lithgow. Based on William Steig's 1990 fairy tale picture book Shrek!, the film was produced by DreamWorks Animation. Shrek was the first film to win an Academy Award for Best Animated Feature, a category introduced in 2001. It was released on DVD and VHS on November 7, 2001. The film stars Myers as a large, strong, solitude-loving, intimidating Scottish ogre named Shrek (from the German word "schreck" meaning "terror" or Yiddish word ????, meaning "fear"), Diaz as the beautiful but very down-to-earth and feisty Princess Fiona, Murphy as a talkative donkey named Donkey, and Lithgow as the villainous Lord Farquaad. It was critically acclaimed as an animated film worthy of adult interest, with many adult-oriented jokes and themes but a simple enough plot and humor to appeal to children. It made notable use of pop music—the soundtrack includes music by Smash Mouth, Eels, Joan Jett, The Proclaimers, Jason Wade, The Baha Men, and Rufus Wainwright. IMPACT OF ANIMATION IN SHREK : IMPACT OF ANIMATION IN SHREK "What's significant about `Shrek,' " said Ken Bielenberg, the film's visual effects supervisor, "is not the individual things but the number — a level of complexity in the movie that hasn't been done before. And the first computer-animated human in a starring role." Last month, "Shrek" became the first American animated feature accepted into competition at the Cannes International Film Festival since Disney's "Peter Pan" in 1953. Inevitably, as technology gallops relentlessly along, these accomplishments will be superseded. And perhaps soon. Word has it that "Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within," a computer-generated feature to be released in July, has made impressive strides toward photo-realism, the completely naturalistic look that is the grail of many Hollywood computer animators. ICE AGE : ICE AGE Ice Age is a feature-length computer-animated film created by Blue Sky Studios and released by 20th Century Fox in 2002. It was directed by Carlos Saldanha and Chris Wedge from a story by Michael J. Wilson. Its sequels are called Ice Age: The Meltdown (2006) and Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs (2009). Ice Age was rated PG for mild peril by the MPAA. IMPACT OF ANIMATION IN ICE AGE : IMPACT OF ANIMATION IN ICE AGE "Ice Age" utilizes the latest technology in computer animation and has an almost "clay-motion" quality to it that, while visually dazzling, softens the harsh environment and the characters, completely fittingly of the theme of the film. By treating the human element as a primitive species and playing up the inter-species social order among the animals as reminiscent to ours, "Ice Age" performs a role-reversal. The animals are given a wide-range of complex personalities and mannerisms, including facial expressions and body language. The presence of the still-evolving humans is reduced to a minor factor in nature. Director Chris Wedge boosts the effect by giving the humans nonverbal parts (other than unintelligible syllables) and giving them a very nondescript appearance. The animation, actors and script play up how truly humorously preposterous the concept is. "Ice Age" is a terrific display of animation technology and what true animation artists can do to create visually appealing and believable setting while making voices really work for the characters. TAARE ZAMEEN PAR : TAARE ZAMEEN PAR Taare Zameen Par (Hindi: ???? ????? ??, Urdu: ???? ???? ??, translation: Stars on Earth) is a 2007 award-winning film directed by Aamir Khan and produced by Aamir Khan Productions. The film was initially conceived of and developed by the husband and wife team, Amole Gupte (writer and creative director) and Deepa Bhatia (concept, research, and editing) [2] and features music by the trio, Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy with lyrics by Prasoon Joshi. CG animation is by Visual Computing Labs, Tata Elxsi Ltd., 2D animation is by Vaibhav Kumaresh’s Vaibhav studios, [3][4]and title animation is by Dhimant Vyas.[5] Taare Zameen Par tells the story of eight year old Ishaan (Darsheel Safary) who suffers greatly until a teacher (Aamir Khan) identifies him as dyslexic. Both commercially and critically acclaimed,[6] Taare Zameen Par won the 2008 Filmfare Best Movie Award as well as a number of other Filmfare and Star Screen Awards. It was declared tax free by the Government of Delhi.[7] The Walt Disney Company has bought the home video rights for distribution of an international edition DVD for future release in North America, the United Kingdom, and Australia. [8] This is "the first time an international studio has bought the video rights of an Indian film."[9] THE MAKERS OF CLAY ANIMATION IN TZP : THE MAKERS OF CLAY ANIMATION IN TZP IMPACT OF ANIMATION IN TZPCLAY ANIMATION : IMPACT OF ANIMATION IN TZPCLAY ANIMATION Aamir Khan's directorial debut Taare Zameen Par was also Bollywood's first attempt at using claymation, clay-animation or animation created using clay. Animation Film Designer Dhimant Vyas who worked on the title sequence of Taare Zameen Par, gave way to his imagination even as he identified with Ishaan's character. Giving shape to clay and giving them an almost life like state is Vyas's forte and that's exactly why Aamir Khan took notice of claymation. Dhimant, a graduate from the National Institute of Design, heaves a sigh of relief as Bollywood is finally opening its doors to the world of animation, even as India continues to be a front-runner for outsourcing for major animation studios in Hollywood. "Its nice that Bollywood is opening up to animation,” says Dhimant. GARFIELD : GARFIELD Garfield: The Movie is a 2004 live-action movie based on the Jim Davis comic strip Garfield. In this movie, Garfield the cat was created with computer-generated imagery, though all other animals were real. The movie was directed by Peter Hewitt, produced by Davis Entertainment for 20th Century Fox, and stars Breckin Meyer as Jon Arbuckle, Jennifer Love Hewitt as Dr. Liz Wilson, and features Bill Murray as the voice of Garfield. The movie was released in the United States on June 11, 2004. Reviews of the movie were generally very negative, although Murray's voice work received some positive notices. IMPACT OF ANIMATION IN GARFIELD : IMPACT OF ANIMATION IN GARFIELD Garfield is a movie in which animation has been used but not so very correctly.. The expressions and the actions, the movement of the eyes, the special effects and the actual sense of animation is not used properly in the whole film. The film’s animation is quite slow, making the audience to grasp the statements properly. This type of animation is called as slow motion animation and the special effects given are known as half done half finish SFX which makes the movie more suitable for the children of 2 to 7 years. As the target of the film was to attract the attention of the kids, it was a huge success and the animation used in it goes hand in hand with its peculiar formation. JURASSIC PARK : JURASSIC PARK Jurassic Park is a 1993 science fiction film directed by Steven Spielberg and based on the novel of the same name by Michael Crichton. The film centers on the fictional island of Isla Nublar, where scientists have created an amusement park of cloned dinosaurs. John Hammond (Richard Attenborough) invites a group of scientists, played by Sam Neill, Jeff Goldblum and Laura Dern, to inspect the park prior to its public opening. Sabotage sets the dinosaurs loose, and the technicians and visitors attempt to escape the island. Jurassic Park is regarded as a landmark in the use of computer-generated imagery, and received positive reviews from critics, who praised the effects, though reactions to other elements of the picture, such as character development, were mixed. During its release, the film grossed more than $914 million, becoming the most successful film released up until that time, and it is currently the tenth-highest-grossing feature film (taking inflation into account, it is the 17th-highest-grossing film in North America). Jurassic Park spawned a franchise of films and other media, including the sequels The Lost World: Jurassic Park (1997) and Jurassic Park III (2001). Jurassic Park IV is currently in development. IMPACT OF ANIMATION IN JURASIC PARK : IMPACT OF ANIMATION IN JURASIC PARK 1993's JURASSIC PARK not only broke box-office records around the world, but also marked a significant time in the evolution of visual effects. Previously, 3D computer generated imagery (CGI) was used sparingly in such films as THE ABYSS and TERMINATOR 2, but the artists and engineers at Industrial Light & Magic pushed the envelope for Spielberg's dinosaur epic, creating full-motion CGI dinosaurs for the 1993 blockbuster. HARRY POTTER AND THE PRISONER OF AZKABAN : HARRY POTTER AND THE PRISONER OF AZKABAN Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban is the third novel in the Harry Potter series written by J. K. Rowling. The book was published on 8 July 1999. The novel won both the 1999 Costa Book Awards and the Bram Stoker Award, and was short-listed for other awards, placing it among the most-honored works of fantasy in recent history.[1] A film based on the book was released on 31 May 2004, in the United Kingdom and June 4, 2004 in the U.S. and many other countries. IMPACT OF ANIMATION ON HARRY POTTER AND THE PRISONER OF AZKABAN : IMPACT OF ANIMATION ON HARRY POTTER AND THE PRISONER OF AZKABAN It’s the film’s emotional little elf slave Dobby that really steals the show. Created by ILM’s visual effects supervisor Bill George and animation supervisor Dave Andrews, the knee-high CG character had to look and act believable. “That character was tailor made for somebody like Dave Andrews to supervise. He gets into those strange sort of characters,” explained Jim Mitchell. Andrews reported that he approached Dobby very much like an actor, drawing inspiration from Huckleberry Finn and the film Waking Ned Devine. He, along with Dobby lead animator Steve Rawlins, fully animated the first five shots and showed them to director Chris Columbus. Those sequences then served as a guide for the 15 animators brought in to work on Dobby. KUNG FU PANDA : KUNG FU PANDA Kung Fu Panda is a 2008 animated film about a bungling panda who aspires to be a kung fu warrior. Kung Fu Panda is directed by John Stevenson and Mark Osborne and produced by Melissa Cobb. Although the concept of a kung fu panda has been around since at least 1993,[3] the idea for the film was conceived by Michael Lachance,[4] a DreamWorks Animation executive. Work on the film did not begin until 2004 with the film premiering at the 61st Cannes Film Festival in May 2008 and seeing general distribution in the summer. The film was produced by DreamWorks Animation's studio in Glendale, California, distributed by Paramount Pictures, and stars the voices of Jack Black, Jackie Chan, Dustin Hoffman, Angelina Jolie, Lucy Liu, Seth Rogen, David Cross, and Ian McShane. Dreamworks is currently working on a sequel to Kung Fu Panda.[5] IMPACT OF ANIMATION IN KUNG FU PANDA : IMPACT OF ANIMATION IN KUNG FU PANDA When it comes to bringing stories and characters to life, DreamWorks Animation earns a black belt. In Kung Fu Panda, the talents of DreamWorks artists meet the traditions of martial arts – creating a visually advanced film that kicks the entire entertainment experience up a notch. The animation used in it makes the character lively, and it perfectly matches the real martial art fighter. THE FLINTSTONES : THE FLINTSTONES The Flintstones is an animated American television sitcom that ran from 1960 to 1966 on ABC. Produced by Hanna-Barbera Productions (H-B), The Flintstones is about a working class Stone Age man's life with his family and his next door neighbor and best friend. The first prime time animated series geared for adults, the show originally aired from 1960 to 1966, on the ABC network. It was also ABC's first series to be televised in color. While the show was originally co-produced and syndicated by Screen Gems, Warner Bros. Television later acquired the rights, through parent Time Warner's purchase of Turner Broadcasting System and its properties, including H-B. Screen Gems / Columbia Pictures Television syndicated repeats of the program until 1981, when The Program Exchange picked up syndication on Columbia's behalf. Syndication later moved in the mid-1990s to Turner Program Services, shortly after Turner's acquisition of H-B, and its acquisition of The Flintstones from Columbia. IMPACT OF ANIMATION IN FLINTSTONES : IMPACT OF ANIMATION IN FLINTSTONES The Flintstones was a comic strip which was converted into animation movie by Hanna Berbara. The animation effect given to its characters are according to the suitability of the children. Flintstones animation is a 2D animation and has succeeded in winning the hearts of many viewers throughout the world. LOVE STORY 2050 : LOVE STORY 2050 Love Story 2050 is a futuristic/sci-fi Bollywood film starring producer Pammi Baweja and director Harry Baweja's son Harman Baweja and Priyanka Chopra. Some parts of the movie were filmed in Adelaide, Australia. Initially the film was supposed to release on December 21, 2007 but got postponed to July 4, 2008 due to extensive post production work. The premiere of the movie was held on July 2, 2008 at London. [3] [4] [5] The movie was released on July 4, 2008. IMPACT OF ANIMATION ON LOVE STORY 2050 : IMPACT OF ANIMATION ON LOVE STORY 2050 Transformation of Mumbai into a super-futuristic metropolis, modelled on Shanghai, robot, teddy bears and an energy-blasting fight scene are some of the visual treats awaiting viewers when the film by director Harry Bajewa goes on the marquees on July 4 Even as India is emerging as the destination of choice for Hollywood studios to outsource their animation and special effects jobs, domestic film studios have been treading cautiously and are only now warming up to pumping big monies into the digital sphere TARZAN : TARZAN Tarzan is a 1999 animated feature film produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation and released by Walt Disney Pictures on June 18, 1999. The thirty-seventh film in the Disney animated features canon, it is based on the story Tarzan of the Apes by Edgar Rice Burroughs, and is the only major motion picture version of the story Tarzan property to be animated. It was also the last "bona fide" hit before the Disney slump of the early 2000s making $171,091,819 in domestic gross and $448,191,819 worldwide, outgrossing its predecessors Mulan and Hercules. To date, it is the last film based on the fictional character Tarzan to have had a theatrical release, and also currently holds the record for being the most expensive Disney animated film, with a budget of $150 million. It was also the first Disney animated feature to open at #1 since Pocahontas. It is the last movie that belongs to the Disney Renaissance. EVERYBODY DANCE NOW… : EVERYBODY DANCE NOW… CRAZY WORMS VIDEO : CRAZY WORMS VIDEO

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